Current Aids News and Events | Page 2

Current Aids News and Events, Aids News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Multiple dosing of long-acting rilpivirine in a model of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis
A long-acting antiretroviral agent such as rilpivirine could further improve pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), already shown to be safe and effective at preventing AIDS in high risk populations, as it could overcome problems with poor medication adherence. (2019-07-25)

Risk of neural tube defects higher for babies of women on HIV therapy with dolutegrav
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug dolutegravir since conception have a slightly higher risk of neural tube defects, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs. (2019-07-22)

Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life
A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not. (2019-07-15)

Persistent HIV DNA in spinal fluid may be associated with cognitive challenges
HIV DNA remained in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants with well-managed HIV (virologic suppression in the plasma), confirming that the central nervous system (CNS) is a major reservoir for latent HIV. Individuals who harbored HIV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid were more likely than other study participants to experience cognitive deficits on neurocognitive testing. (2019-07-15)

Lower than expected risk of bone density decline with Truvada PrEP
Researchers have shown that among users of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent against AIDS that includes tenofovir (Truvada), those with daily use -- very high adherence -- had only about a 1% average decrease in bone mineral density in the spine and a 0.5% decline in the hip. (2019-07-15)

VINO's O2Amp Oxy-Iso glasses ineffective at curing colour-blindness
In their new study, they find that the O2Amp 'Oxy-Iso' glasses, marketed by the US company VINO Optics, neither improve the color vision of people with color-blindness nor correct their color-blindness. (2019-06-17)

Cancer survival rates in the young show inconsistent progress
A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that dramatic increases in cancer survival in adolescents and young adults are undermined by continuing disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The patterns here suggest that most of the recent survival increases in this age group were driven by improvements in treatments for HIV/AIDS and related cancers. (2019-06-12)

Does being seen really make cyclists safer on the road?
Researchers from UBC Okanagan have determined motorists tended to give cyclists wearing high-visibility vests more room on the road, compared to cyclists without high-visibility clothing. The vests, with arrows directing traffic away from pedestrians and cyclists, have shown to reduce the number of traffic accidents involving these groups. (2019-05-28)

Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. Based on their findings, the researchers are urging HIV clinics to expand their mental health services on site. (2019-05-21)

Index that tracks impact of pharmaceuticals worldwide to relaunch, focus on more diseases
The Global Health Impact Index, developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York to rank pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health, is launching a new, more-robust model that addresses even more diseases worldwide. (2019-05-06)

Immediate HIV treatment initiation: Increased but not yet universal in NYC
A new study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases found that immediate treatment initiation for HIV infection has improved since local and federal guidelines began to recommend universal treatment for all persons diagnosed with HIV, regardless of their disease stage. (2019-05-06)

Low use of hearing aids among older Hispanic/Latino adults in US
This study examined how common hearing aids were and the factors associated with their use among a group of nearly 1,900 adults (average age 60) of Hispanic/Latino backgrounds with hearing loss. The results reveal low use of hearing aids, with only 87 adults (4.6 percent) reporting use. (2019-04-18)

C-Path, CDISC develop therapeutic area standard to foster meaningful research for HIV
The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) and CDISC are pleased to announce the release of a global Therapeutic Area Standard that specifies how to structure commonly collected data and outcome measurements in clinical trials for HIV. The standard, released in the form of User Guide for data managers, statisticians, programmers and study managers, covers the areas of prevention, vaccines and treatment and is freely available on the CDISC website. (2019-04-16)

HIV/tuberculosis co-infection: Tunneling towards better diagnosis
1.2 million people in the world are co-infected by the bacteria which causes tuberculosis and AIDS. This combination is deadly: it makes patient diagnosis and treatment difficult, and increases the pathogenicity of these two infectious agents. A team led by researchers at the CNRS and Inserm have revealed that in the presence of tuberculosis, HIV-1 moves from one cell to the next via nanotubes which form between macrophages, drastically increasing the percentage of infected cells. (2019-03-26)

Study: AIDS-immunocompromised populations see more antibiotic-resistant infections
Populations with a high prevalence of AIDS-immunocompromised people are more likely to see the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, according to a study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in PLOS One. (2019-03-26)

Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior
Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new Journal of Zoology study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants. (2019-03-20)

What is the real link between bacterial vaginosis and HIV risk in women?
An international team of researchers presents a comprehensive and renewed focus on the common, yet poorly understood condition of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and how the microbial make-up of the vagina can affect a woman's risk of acquiring HIV and AIDS. (2019-03-15)

Administration budget proposal undermined by concurrent cuts
The White House budget proposal for 2020 recommends increases to the domestic HIV programs at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration and Indian Health Services that will be essential to keeping the administration's promise of ending our nation's HIV epidemic in the next decade. (2019-03-12)

Kids with cochlear implants since infancy more likely to speak, not sign
Researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago present further evidence that deaf children who received cochlear implants (implanted electronic hearing device) before 12 months of age learn to more rapidly understand spoken language and are more likely to develop spoken language as their exclusive form of communication. (2019-03-05)

Latest anti-retroviral drug regimens provide 'Lazarus Effect' for HIV patients
Frailty related to HIV infection 'is rapidly becoming a specter of the past' and today it 'is possible to control HIV infection in all patients,' according to a perspective article authored by a clinical team at the University of Arizona College of Medicine -- Tucson. (2019-02-27)

Tools to help seriously ill patients near death make decisions about their care aren't commonly used in routine practice
Many seriously ill people in the United States -- and around the world -- are not dying as they would like. Yet, a new study led by Dartmouth Institute Ph.D. student Catherine Saunders found that although there are dozens of tools available to help people make difficult decisions near the end of their lives, they are of varying quality and very few are actually available for patients and families to use in hospitals. (2019-02-20)

Research identifies pathway connecting some ARV drugs with liver disease
Research out of the University of Kentucky has identified a potential pathway by which certain ARV drugs -- commonly given to patients with HIV -- give rise to liver disease. (2019-01-31)

Exploring the connection between hearing loss and cognitive decline
A new study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital adds to a growing body of evidence that hearing loss is associated with higher risk of cognitive decline. (2019-01-29)

Decision-making tool fails to ease anxiety for families of life-support patients
Using a computer-based decision guide to plan treatment for a loved one on life support can help families feel less conflicted, but did not ease symptoms of depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress, according to new research led by Duke Health. (2019-01-28)

Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism. A new test provides researchers with a better understanding of the source of this difficulty. (2019-01-25)

Older people who use hearing aids still report hearing challenges
A high proportion of older people with hearing aids, especially those with lower incomes, report having trouble hearing and difficulty accessing hearing care services, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-01-07)

Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS. (2019-01-04)

The opioid crisis: What we should learn from the AIDS epidemic
There are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic. Decades of HIV research have demonstrated that the existence of an effective biomedical treatment is rarely, in and of itself, sufficient to combat an epidemic, suggesting that both a social as well as a biomedical response to the opioid crisis are necessary in order to be effective. (2019-01-03)

Certain moral values may lead to more prejudice, discrimination
People who value following purity rules over caring for others are more likely to view gay and transgender people as less human, which leads to more prejudice and support for discriminatory public policies, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association. (2018-12-20)

3D printing offers helping hand to patients with arthritis
3D printing can cut the cost of adaptive aids that help people with hand arthritis. Current products are quite expensive, and more so to create customized versions, but 3D printing drops the cost by an average of 94 percent for 20 different handheld devices. (2018-12-12)

Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. (2018-12-12)

New research highlights why HIV-infected patients suffer higher rates of cancer
AIDS patients suffer higher rates of cancer because they have fewer T-cells in their bodies to fight disease. But new research examines why HIV-infected patients have higher rates of cancer--among the leading causes of death among that population--than the general population. (2018-12-05)

Ending the HIV epidemic: Where does Europe stand?
From diagnosis of HIV to successful viral suppression: in a rapid communication published in Eurosurveillance today, ECDC and co-authors from Public Health England and The National AIDS Trust summarise the progress towards HIV elimination in 52 countries in Europe and Central Asia. The main issues: diagnosing those who are unaware of their HIV infection and treating them. (2018-11-29)

New HIV diagnoses at high levels in the European Region but progress in EU
With nearly 160,000 new HIV diagnoses, 2017 marked another year of alarming numbers of HIV diagnoses in the WHO European Region. Encouragingly, the overall increasing trend is not as steep as before. The eastern part of the Region recorded over 130,000 new HIV diagnoses, the highest number ever. In contrast, the EU/EEA countries reported a decline in rates, mainly driven by a 20 percent decrease since 2015 among men who have sex with men. (2018-11-28)

Mobile health has power to transform HIV/AIDS nursing
The abundance of personal smartphones in southern African countries got University of Washington professor Sarah Gimbel thinking: What if these phones were used by front-line health workers -- namely nurses -- to collect and analyze data on patients living with HIV or AIDS to improve their care? (2018-11-21)

Long-term study shows that HIV-2 is deadlier than previously thought
A study published in The Lancet HIV shows that HIV-2 is more pathogenic than previously demonstrated. The new findings indicate that early treatment should be applied to all patients with HIV, not only to those with HIV-1. (2018-11-07)

Managing the complexities and risks of HIV and tuberculosis coinfection
A new study identified a significant association between HIV infection and complexities of treating patients with tuberculosis coinfection. (2018-10-18)

USC analysis solves puzzle of poor cancer prognosis in young Americans
For decades, some researchers believed cancer survival rates were dismally low among adolescents and young adults in the United States. A reexamination of long-term data by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program shows that 15- to 39-year-olds had the best survival of any age group for many years, and maintained that lead until pediatric cancer survival caught up. (2018-10-15)

HIV-positive infants are at high risk for acquiring congenital cytomegalovirus infection
Infants born to HIV-positive mothers had high rates of congenital cytomegalovirus, or CMV. Infants who also were infected before birth by the virus that causes AIDS were especially prone to CMV infection. (2018-10-15)

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss
Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics. According to Dr. Piers Dawes and Dr. Asri Maharani, cognitive decline -- which affects memory and thinking skills -- is slowed after patient's hearing and sight are improved. (2018-10-11)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.