Current Air Quality News and Events

Current Air Quality News and Events, Air Quality News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
More than just CO2: It's time to tackle short-lived climate-forcing pollutants
Climate change mitigation is about more than just CO2. So-called 'short-lived climate-forcing pollutants' such as soot, methane, and tropospheric ozone all have harmful effects. Climate policy should be guided by a clearer understanding of their differentiated impacts. (2021-01-27)

Air purifiers may do more harm than good in confined spaces with airborne viruses
The positions of air inlets and outlets in confined spaces, such as elevators, greatly affect airborne virus transmission. In Physics of Fluids, researchers show air purifiers may actually increase the spread. They use ultraviolet radiation to kill viruses and other microbes, but they also circulate air, sucking it in and exhausting cleaned air. This adds to overall circulation. (2021-01-26)

Study finds water quality improvements in Maryland's Choptank River
The Chesapeake Bay has a long history of nutrient pollution resulting in degraded water quality. However, scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are reporting some improvements in the Choptank River on Maryland's Eastern Shore, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay that is often used as a model for progress in restoring the estuary. (2021-01-26)

Satellite data reveals bonds between emissions, pollution and economy
Burning fossil fuels has long powered world economies while contributing to air pollution and the buildup of greenhouse gases. A new analysis of nearly two decades of satellite data shows that economic development, fossil-fuel combustion and air quality are closely linked on the continental and national scales, but can be decoupled at the national level, according to Penn State scientists. (2021-01-26)

Reactive halogen from domestic coal burning aggravates winter air pollution
During the winter in the North China Plain, scientists found high concentrations of reactive halogen gases (BrCl, HOBr, Cl2) in the atmosphere which was associated with widespread coal burning in rural areas. Halogen atoms released from BrCl and Cl2 under sunlight significantly increased the oxidative capacity, and has the potential to boost the productions of secondary aerosols - the major components of winter haze in northern China - and the toxic form of mercury. (2021-01-25)

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2021-01-25)

The downward trend: Nature's decline risks our quality of life
Scientists conducted a sweeping review of nature's contributions to humans in order to present a clear breakdown of global trends since 1970. Not surprisingly, the results are grim (2021-01-21)

Stanford: forecasting coastal water quality
Using water samples and environmental data gathered over 48 hours or less, Stanford engineers develop a new predictive technique for forecasting coastal water quality, a critical step in protecting public health and the ocean economy. (2021-01-21)

Butterfly wing clap explains mystery of flight
The fluttery flight of butterflies has so far been somewhat of a mystery to researchers, given their unusually large and broad wings relative to their body size. Now researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied the aerodynamics of butterflies in a wind tunnel. The results suggest that butterflies use a highly effective clap technique, therefore making use of their unique wings. This helps them rapidly take off when escaping predators. (2021-01-20)

Purely organic hole transporter
Durable, high-performing perovskite solar cells also require durable, high-performing charge-transporting layers. Scientists have developed the first organic hole transporter that does not need a dopant to attain high charge mobility and stability. According to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this novel hole-transporting layer outperforms reference materials and protects the perovskite organic cell from air humidity. (2021-01-18)

NUS engineers create 'smart' aerogel that turns air into drinking water
Researchers from NUS Engineering have developed a new aerogel that autonomously absorbs water from the atmosphere and then releases it effortlessly without any external power source. This invention is a promising solution for sustainable, freshwater production. (2021-01-18)

A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, news research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground. (2021-01-14)

How will we achieve carbon-neutral flight in future?
Carbon-neutral aviation is possible, but in future, aircraft are likely to continue to be powered by fossil fuels. The CO2 they emit must be systematically stored underground. This is the most economical of various approaches that ETH researchers have compared in detail. (2021-01-13)

Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice free by 2055. (2021-01-13)

Early COVID-19 lockdowns had less impact on urban air quality than first believed
The first COVID-19 lockdowns led to significant changes in urban air pollution levels around the world, but the changes were smaller than expected - a new study reveals. (2021-01-13)

Eastern and central China become brighter due to clean air action
A new study finds that the air pollution control actions can lead to not only considerable environmental and health improvements, but also increases in solar photovoltaic energy production. (2021-01-13)

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (2021-01-12)

Significant number of patients with sudden loss of consciousness need pre-hospital critical care
Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) in partnership with the University of Surrey has shown the benefits of dispatching HEMS to patients with a sudden, unexplained LOC of medical origin and a high prevalence of acute neurological pathology. (2021-01-07)

It's getting hot in here: Warming world will fry power plant production in coming years
During the year's hottest months, many people rely on electricity-generated cooling systems to remain comfortable. But the power plants that keep air conditioners pushing out cold air could soon be in a vicious cycle in a warming world-not able to keep up with growing demands on hotter days and driving up greenhouse gas emissions to dangerous levels. (2021-01-06)

The Lancet Planetary Health: Meeting India's air quality targets across south Asia may prevent 7% of pregnancy losses, modelling study estimates
Poor air quality is associated with a considerable proportion of pregnancy loss in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal. (2021-01-06)

Sweat, bleach and gym air quality
One sweaty, huffing, exercising person emits as many chemicals from their body as up to five sedentary people, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study. And notably, those human emissions, including amino acids from sweat or acetone from breath, chemically combine with bleach cleaners to form new airborne chemicals with unknown impacts to indoor air quality. (2021-01-05)

Innovative battery chemistry revolutionizes zinc-air battery
The zinc-air battery is an attractive energy storage technology of the future. Based on an innovative, non-alkaline, aqueous electrolyte, an international research team led by scientist Dr. Wei Sun of MEET Battery Research Center at the University of Muenster has developed a new battery chemistry for the zinc-air battery which overcomes the previous technical obstacles. (2021-01-04)

New proposal for how aerosols drive increased atmospheric convection in thunderstorm clouds
High in the clouds, atmospheric aerosols, including anthropogenic air pollutants, increase updraft speeds in storm clouds by making the surrounding air more humid, a new study finds. (2020-12-31)

New report reveals human, economic toll of air pollution in India
Air pollution has devastating consequences for India, accounting for 1.67 million deaths in 2019 and economic losses of $36.8 billion (US), according to a new report by an international group of scientists led by researchers from Boston College's Global Observatory on Pollution and Health, the Indian Council of Medical Research, and the Public Health Foundation of India. (2020-12-22)

What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic? Cumulative benefits during this period would amount to thousands of avoided cases of illness and death in children and adults, as well as associated economic benefits between $32 to $77 billion. (2020-12-21)

New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks. (2020-12-21)

Potentially damaging surface ozone levels rose in lockdown
Less traffic on the roads during the first lockdown led to a reduction in air pollution but may have caused potentially damaging surface ozone levels to rise, a new study has revealed. (2020-12-18)

Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Since 2014, the University of Utah has maintained research-grade suites of air quality instruments installed on light rail trains that move throughout the Salt Lake Valley every day. These mobile sensors, researchers estimate in a new study, cover the same area as 30 stationary sensors, providing the Salt Lake Valley with a highly cost-effective way to monitor its greenhouse emissions and fill in gaps in emissions estimates. (2020-12-17)

Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the 'skin' that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering. (2020-12-17)

Wildfire smoke carry microbes that can cause infectious diseases
Wildfire smoke contains microbes, infectious agents that might cause diseases. In a perspective piece published in Science, researchers at UC Davis Health and the University of Idaho proposed a multidisciplinary approach to study the health impacts of microbes carried by wildfire smokes. (2020-12-17)

Mystery solved: new study shows link between hot and dry weather and air quality in Korea
Although air quality in Korea has been declining over the past few decades, the reasons behind the steady rise in ground-level ozone concentrations are a mystery. In a recent study, scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, investigated the relationship between synoptic weather patterns and ozone levels, revealing another worrisome link between air pollution and climate change. (2020-12-15)

COVID-19: indoor air in hospitals and nursing homes require more attention
A variety of measures are necessary to prevent the spread of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in hospitals and nursing homes. It is particularly important to develop an appropriate strategy to protect healthcare workers from airborne transmission. More attention is required in respect to indoor air in such facilities and to further training of the staff. (2020-12-14)

LED lights found to kill coronavirus: Global first in fight against COVID-19
Researchers from Tel Aviv University have proven that the coronavirus can be killed efficiently, quickly, and cheaply using ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). They believe that the UV-LED technology will soon be available for private and commercial use. (2020-12-14)

Shedding light on the dark side of biomass burning pollution
Especially toxic, oxidized aerosol from biomass burning contains a large amount of carcinogens and mutagens. It also cause oxidative stress when inhaled as well as a wide range of diseases such as heart attacks, strokes, and asthma. A study, led by the FORTH foundation in Greece and EPFL in Switzerland, identifies new processes in the forming of these aerosols and suggests their levels are largely underestimated. (2020-12-14)

Immediate detection of airborne viruses with a disposable kit!
The KIST-GIST collaborative research team developed an integrated sampling/monitoring platform that uses a disposable kit to easily collect and detect airborne viruses on-site. The disposable virus sampling/monitoring kit developed by the team is similar to the pregnancy test kit, and enables completion of both sampling and diagnosing on airborne viruses within 50 minutes on-site (10 to 30 minutes of sampling and 20 minutes of diagnosis) without requiring a separate cleaning or separation process. (2020-12-10)

Fans may relieve breathlessness associated with advanced cancers
Blowing air from a fan into the face of patients with advanced cancer experiencing breathlessness, and other nonpharmacologic interventions, may offer symptom relief, according to new research directed by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. (2020-12-10)

Quality suffers for audit offices that emphasize non-audit services, study shows
Regulators have expressed concerns that audit firms' emphasis on non-audit services (NAS) such as consulting could distract from an audit, and quality does suffer in certain cases, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-12-10)

Pollution from cooking remains in atmosphere for longer - study
Particulate emissions from cooking stay in the atmosphere for longer than previously thought, making a prolonged contribution to poor air quality and human health, according to a new study. (2020-12-08)

AGU panel explores environmental impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, as observed from space
COVID-19 has changed the way we live and work, as various health and safety restrictions keep more of us at home more often. The resulting changes to our behavior are already impacting the environment around us in myriad ways, according to comparisons of remote sensing data before and during the pandemic collected by NASA, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and ESA (European Space Agency) Earth-observing satellites and others. (2020-12-08)

Colorado mountains bouncing back from 'acid rain' impacts
Niwot Ridge in the Rocky Mountains is slowly recovering from increased acidity caused by vehicle emissions in Colorado's Front Range, suggesting that alpine regions across the Mountain West may be recovering. This is good news for the wildlife and wildflowers of Rocky Mountain National Park and for water sources that supply the Front Range and the Mountain West. (2020-12-08)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.