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Current Aircraft News and Events, Aircraft News Articles.
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Commercial airliners monitoring CO2 emissions from cities worldwide
Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from cities is important in order to support climate mitigation activities in response to the Paris Agreement. An international research team examined carbon dioxide (CO2) data collected over 34 global cities by Japan's commercial airliners. Their study revealed a relationship between urban atmospheric CO2 signals and emissions from cities for the first time. The relationship suggests that global observations by commercial airlines could provide an opportunity for urban CO2 emissions monitoring. (2020-05-15)

How the chemical industry can meet the climate goals
ETH researchers analysed various possibilities for reducing the net CO2 emissions of the chemical industry to zero. Their conclusion? The chemical industry can in fact have a carbon-neutral future. (2020-04-06)

Bristol scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C
Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory. The work, which is reported in Nature Communications, is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency. (2020-03-04)

Small altitude changes could cut the climate impact of aircraft
Contrails -- the white, fluffy streaks in the sky that form behind planes -- can harm the environment. Now, scientists report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that small flight path adjustments could reduce the climate impact of these emissions. (2020-02-12)

Small altitude changes could cut climate impact of aircraft by up to 59%
Altering the altitudes of less than 2% of flights could reduce contrail-linked climate change by 59%, says a new Imperial study. (2020-02-12)

Bumblebees carry heavy loads in economy mode
Bumblebees are the big lifters of the insect world, able to fly back to the hive with almost their own bodyweight in nectar on board. A study published Feb. 5 in Science Advances shows how they do it -- and that bees can show more flexibility in behavior than you might expect from a bumbling insect. (2020-02-05)

Researchers develop new bio-inspired wing design for small drones
Taking a cue from birds and insects, Brown University researchers have come up with a new wing design for small drones that helps them fly more efficiently and makes them more robust to atmospheric turbulence. (2020-01-29)

New understanding of condensation could lead to better power plant condenser, de-icing materials
For decades, it's been understood that water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup - like the droplets of water that form in power plant condensers to reduce pressure. New research shows that the necessity of water repellency is unclear and that the slipperiness between the droplets and solid surface appears to be more critical to the clearing of condensation. This development has implications for the costs associated with power generation and technologies like de-icing surfaces for power lines and aircraft. (2020-01-23)

Iodine may slow ozone layer recovery
Air pollution and iodine from the ocean contribute to damage of Earth's ozone layer. (2020-01-13)

UW scientist to lead upcoming NASA field study of East Coast snowstorms
To better understand large, disruptive snowstorms, a University of Washington atmospheric scientist will lead a NASA field campaign studying major East Coast snowstorms beginning Jan. 15. She will present the field campaign this week at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. (2019-12-10)

National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?
National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected. During the 178th ASA Meeting, Kurt Fristrup will present the findings and how human responses to noise might be studied. (2019-12-04)

New electrodes could increase efficiency of electric vehicles and aircraft
The rise in popularity of electric vehicles and aircraft presents the possibility of moving away from fossil fuels toward a more sustainable future. While significant technological advancements have dramatically increased the efficiency of these vehicles, there are still several issues standing in the way of widespread adoption. (2019-11-22)

Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions
From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that -- in the colder months, at least -- some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the researchers say. (2019-11-21)

FSU researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft
The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft. But the life of those materials is limited by how they handle heat. A team of FAMU-FSU College of Engineering researchers from Florida State University's High-Performance Materials Institute is developing a design for a heat shield that better protects those extremely fast machines. (2019-11-14)

Aircraft pilots usually cannot spot an encroaching drone, study shows
Skilled pilots approaching a runway usually can't see small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) encroaching on their airspace, and they virtually never detect motionless drones, researchers at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Oklahoma State University have reported. (2019-10-30)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Olga merge with a cold front
Tropical Depression 17 strengthened briefly into a tropical storm on the same day it formed, Oct. 25. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the clouds associated with its remnants merging with a cold front over the southern U.S. (2019-10-28)

Research tests speed of drones in responding to medical emergency scenarios
Could drones be used someday to deliver life-saving medications or interventions in the case of a child's emergency, a drug overdose or in response to a mass casualty scene? According to new research presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition, it's an idea worth exploring. (2019-10-25)

Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings
The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use. (2019-10-21)

NASA sees Karen regain tropical storm status
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Caribbean Sea and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Karen's cloud tops. Data showed powerful thunderstorms re-developed in around the storm's center as it strengthened back into a tropical storm. (2019-09-24)

Researchers develop unified sensor to better control effects of shock waves
Researchers with Yokohama National University in Japan have developed a unified shock sensor to quickly and accurately dispel harmful shock waves. They published their results on July 4 in the Journal of Computational Physics. (2019-09-19)

NASA satellite provides a view of a large hurricane Humberto
NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Humberto when it was off the coast of the Carolinas and slowly moving north. The satellite image revealed that Humberto is a very large storm. (2019-09-17)

NASA finds Humberto strengthening off the Florida Coast
NASA's Aqua Satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Humberto as it was strengthening off the Florida coast on Sept. 15, 2019. Humberto became a hurricane late in the day. (2019-09-16)

NASA's IMERG estimates hurricane Dorian's rain
In the early hours of Tuesday, September 3, Hurricane Dorian had been stationary over the island of Grand Bahama for 18 hours, most of the time as a category 5 hurricane. Storm-total rain accumulation over parts of Grand Bahama and Abaco Islands have exceeded 24 inches according to NASA satellite-based estimates. (2019-09-03)

Researchers develop technique to de-ice surfaces in seconds
Airplane wings, wind turbines and indoor heating systems all struggle under the weight and chill of ice. De-icing techniques are energy-intensive, however, and often require large masses of ice to melt completely in order to work. Researchers from the University of Illinois and Kyushu University have developed a new technique that requires only a thin layer of ice at the interface of a surface to melt, allowing it to slide off under the force of gravity. (2019-09-03)

2019 Airline Water Study by CUNY's Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center
A 2019 Airline Water Study released today by DietDetective.com and the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center at the City University of New York reveals that the quality of drinking water varies by airline, and many airlines have possibly provided passengers with unhealthy water. (2019-08-29)

UBC-developed sensor provides next-generation ice detection
A new sensor, that can detect ice accumulation in real-time, might be a game-changer when it comes to airline safety and efficiency. (2019-08-08)

Airborne lidar system poised to improve accuracy of climate change models
Researchers have developed a laser-based system that can be used for airborne measurement of important atmospheric gases with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. The ability to collect this data will help scientists better understand how these atmospheric gases affect the climate and could help improve climate change predictions. (2019-07-22)

GPM satellite provides a 3D look at Tropical Storm Barry
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a couple of views of Tropical Storm Barry that showed its cloud heights and rainfall rates. (2019-07-11)

'Eyes' for the autopilot
Automatic landings have long been standard procedure for commercial aircraft. While major airports have the infrastructure necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the aircraft, this is usually not the case at smaller airports. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and TU Braunschweig have now demonstrated a completely automatic landing with vision assisted navigation that functions properly without the need for ground-based systems. (2019-07-04)

Climate impact of clouds made from airplane contrails may triple by 2050
In the right conditions, airplane contrails can linger in the sky as contrail cirrus -- ice clouds that can trap heat inside the atmosphere. Their climate impact has been largely neglected in schemes to offset aviation emissions, even though contrail cirrus have contributed more to warming than all CO2 emitted by aircraft since the start of aviation. A new Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics study found that the climate impact of contrail cirrus will triple by 2050. (2019-06-27)

The making of 'warm ice'
The Center for Convergence Property Measurement, Frontier in Extreme Physics Team at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) succeeded in creating room-temperature ice and controlling its growth behaviors by dynamically compressing water up to pressures above 10,000 atmospheres. (2019-06-25)

US military consumes more hydrocarbons than most countries -- massive hidden impact on climate
Research by social scientists from Durham University and Lancaster University shows the US military is one of the largest climate polluters in history, consuming more liquid fuels and emitting more CO2e (carbon-dioxide equivalent) than most countries. (2019-06-19)

Intercultural communication crucial for engineering education
In an increasingly connected world it helps to engage with other cultures without prejudice or assumption. This is true in engineering as it is in any other field, but UTokyo researchers reveal shortcomings in how intercultural communication is taught to potential engineers. (2019-06-06)

Aluminum is the new steel: NUST MISIS scientists made it stronger than ever before
Aluminum is one of the most promising materials for aeronautics and automobile industry. Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' found a simple and efficient way of strengthening aluminum-based composite materials. Doping aluminum melt with nickel and lanthanum, scientists managed to create a material combining benefits of both composite materials and standard alloys: flexibility, strength, lightness. The article on the research is published in Materials Letters. (2019-05-24)

Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways
In a unique, innovative experiment, researchers under the leadership of the University of Bern have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. It was also shown that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines. (2019-05-16)

Study suggests crash location of MH370 near 25°S, north of underwater search area
A new analysis of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 found that the most probable crash site in the Indian Ocean is near 25°S, north of the area where most of the underwater search missions were performed. (2019-05-08)

SwRI develops system to legally test GPS spoofing vulnerabilities in automated vehicles
Southwest Research Institute has developed a cyber security system to test for vulnerabilities in automated vehicles and other technologies that use GPS receivers for positioning, navigation and timing. (2019-04-30)

A Jetsons future? Assessing the role of flying cars in sustainable mobility
In the 1960s animated sitcom 'The Jetsons,' George Jetson commutes to work in his family-size flying car, which miraculously transforms into a briefcase at the end of the trip. (2019-04-09)

High-tech material in a salt crust
MAX phases unite the positive properties of ceramics and metals. A method developed by scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich now makes it possible to produce this material class on an industrial scale: a salt crust protects the raw material from oxidation at a temperature of more than 1,000 degrees Celsius -- and can then simply be washed off with water. The method, which was recently published in Nature Materials, can also be applied to other high-performance materials. (2019-04-03)

How to ice-proof the next generation of aircraft
To prevent ice formation on aircraft during flight, current systems utilize the heat generated by burning fuel, but these high-temperature, fuel-dependent systems cannot be used on the proposed all-electric, temperature-sensitive materials of next-generation aircraft. As some scientists search for new anti-icing methods, some have taken a different approach. They've published evidence in Physics of Fluids showing that equipment important in controlling landing and takeoff can double-up as icing control. It depends on plasma actuators. (2019-04-01)

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