Current Alternative Medicine News and Events | Page 3

Current Alternative Medicine News and Events, Alternative Medicine News Articles.
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Quorn protein builds muscle better than milk protein
A study from the University of Exeter has found that mycoprotein, the protein-rich food source that is unique to Quorn products, stimulates post-exercise muscle building to a greater extent than milk protein. (2019-07-03)

New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)

Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?
A JAMA Internal Medicine commentary by three Regenstrief Institute research scientists calls for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue. (2019-06-24)

Study challenges 'no pain no gain' requirement for patients with clogged leg arteries
Patients with peripheral arterial disease should be given the option of pain-free exercise, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-06-20)

Psoriasis patients turn to alternative medicine when traditional treatments fail
A recent survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found patients with psoriasis frequently use complementary or alternative therapies to treat their symptoms when traditional treatments fail. (2019-06-20)

Timed release of turmeric stops cancer cell growth
A WSU research team has developed a drug delivery system using curcumin, the main ingredient in the spice turmeric, that successfully inhibits bone cancer cells while promoting growth of healthy bone cells. (2019-06-20)

Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial
A world-first study at James Cook University in Australia has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles. (2019-06-18)

Common conditions keep many patients out of knee cartilage research studies
Issues like age or existing arthritis may preclude patients from participating in clinical studies for new therapies that could benefit them (2019-06-13)

The FASEB Journal: Alternative molecular mechanisms observed in cancer cells
Current anti-cancer drugs can be quite effective but too often, tumors are not fought off completely and end up returning. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal provides the first evidence that some cancer cells evade therapy by switching over to alternative molecular mechanisms that are not affected by existing anti-cancer treatments. (2019-05-30)

New study reveals an unexpected survival mechanism of a subset of cancer cells
A research group led by Claus M. Azzalin at iMM has discovered that a human enzyme named FANCM is absolutely required for the survival of ALT tumor cells. The results were now published in the open access journal Nature Communications. Future strategies targeting the activity of this molecule in ALT tumor cells can constitute the basis of a novel therapeutic protocol for the treatment of these tumors. (2019-05-28)

Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives
Producing cement takes a big toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process. However, the demand for cement continues to rise. A team of geoscientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a way to produce more environmentally friendly and sustainable alternatives. In the journal ''Construction and Building Materials'' they describe how industrial residues can be used to produce high-quality, climate-friendly materials. (2019-05-20)

Tobacco and e-cig promotions spark teens' use of nicotine products, Stanford study finds
Owning items that promote e-cigarettes and other alternative tobacco products doubles the likelihood that a young person will try these products, a new study led by the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. The finding illustrates the influence of such marketing on teenagers. (2019-05-17)

Alternative treatment for epileptic seizures in children identified
A new study published in The Lancet, involving researchers from the University of Liverpool and Alder Hey Children's Hospital Trust, has identified a 'user friendly' treatment for the most common life-threatening neurological emergency in children. (2019-05-07)

Research on Reddit identifies opioid addiction self-treatment risks
Using advanced machine-learning techniques, Georgia Tech researchers have examined nearly 1.5 million Reddit posts to identify risks associated with several of the most common alternative -- and unproven -- 'treatments' for opioid addiction. (2019-05-02)

Solar panel demand causing spike in worldwide silver prices
Rising demand for solar panels is having a major effect on the worldwide price of silver, which could lead to solar panel production costs becoming far higher in the future, new research from the University of Kent has demonstrated. (2019-04-17)

One-third of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine
A stunning one-third of people with a cancer diagnosis use complementary and alternative medicines such as meditation, yoga, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and supplements. (2019-04-11)

Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach
Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). (2019-04-09)

China's acceptance of non-animal testing methods for the regulation of cosmetics
The Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS) applauds China's National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) for their acceptance of certain non-animal (alternative) test methods for the regulation of cosmetics. (2019-04-03)

Same properties, lower cost
Japanese scientists have developed a technique to transform a copper-based substance into a material that mimics properties of precious and pricey metals, such as gold and silver. (2019-04-01)

London cyclists warned evening commute has the dirtiest air, so pick a clean route home
Cyclists in London should take a different route back home during evening peak-time hours to avoid breathing in harmful black carbon from vehicles. (2019-04-01)

New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to reveal dark matter of the transcriptome
A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA. Because variations in how RNA is spliced play crucial roles in many diseases, this new analytical tool will provide greater capabilities for discovering disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, even from RNA-sequencing data sets with modest coverage. (2019-03-25)

Transformation of VA to 'whole health' model featured in JACM special issue
As medical delivery organizations seek to meet the Triple Aim, address social determinants of health, and move from volume to value, a leading-edge effort is the 'whole health' model in the US Veterans Administration (VA). (2019-03-20)

A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products
The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils. (2019-03-18)

New research explores value-based medicine, integrative health, and whole systems research
Two decades ago, the popular movement for integrative health practices prompted researchers to advance 'whole systems research' (WSR). (2019-03-18)

Advances in naturopathy research reported in new special issue of JACM
Naturopathy, or 'naturopathic medicine' as the profession is branded in the United States, is a rapidly growing profession and scientifically advancing form of practice that can have a positive impact on a wide variety of chronic and complex conditions. (2019-02-20)

Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation
Choosing the 'right' brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. Jonathan Brumberg of the University of Kansas will present on this subject and demonstrate a variety of brain-computer interfaces Feb. 17 at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-15)

New machine learning method could spare some women from unnecessary breast surgery
Dartmouth researchers have developed and evaluated a machine learning approach of using patient core needle biopsy data to identify the risk that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) breast lesions may upgrade to cancer. This knowledge can potentially help clinicians and low-risk patients decide whether active surveillance and hormonal therapy is a reasonable management approach. Using the method could spare patients with benign lesions from invasive surgeries while maintaining high sensitivity for predicting malignant lesions. (2019-02-12)

RUDN biochemists found a way to stop the immortality of cancer cells with oligonucleotides
RUDN biochemists found a way to reduce the activity of telomerase (the enzyme of cell immortality) 10 times. (2019-02-11)

A hidden route for fatty acids can make cancers resistant to therapy
Researchers from the lab of Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology now demonstrate that certain tumor cells use an alternative -- previously unexplored -- pathway to produce fatty acids. This finding can explain the resistance of particular cancer types to fatty acid metabolism inhibition. (2019-02-06)

A match made in neural heaven: How a neuron grows an axon
While the neural architecture responsible for the transmission of electrical impulses has been known for more than a century, the basic biology behind how a neuron acquires its one and only axon -- a fundamental component of how neurons communicate -- remains a mystery. In a new paper, a researcher at the University of California, Riverside, and his colleagues describe the genetic switches that ignite axon formation. Their work focuses on two molecular components. (2019-02-04)

Green alternative to PET could be even greener
One of the most successful plastics is polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the material we use to make bottles and fibers for clothing. However, PET is made from petroleum-based building blocks. An alternative to PET can be made from bio-based furan molecules, but to polymerize these furans you need toxic catalysts and high temperatures. Now, polymer chemists from the University of Groningen, led by Prof. Katja Loos, have described an enzyme-based polymerization method. (2019-01-30)

Mechanism explains breast cancer cell plasticity
Researchers have discovered that breast cancer stem cells can shift between cell surface molecules CD44s and CD44v via alternative splicing and consequently alter their ability to survive. (2019-01-28)

Gene changes may predict breast cancer relapse, study suggests
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have identified genetic changes that may predict the likelihood of breast cancer relapse in women taking a common type of hormone therapy. (2019-01-21)

Study of traditional medicine finds high use in Sub-Saharan Africa despite modern medicine
Researchers who have undertaken the first systematic review of into the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM) in Sub-Saharan Africa found its use is significant and not just because of a lack of resources or access to 'conventional medicine'. (2018-12-18)

High risk alternative tobacco products disproportionately sold in low-income communities
Retailers in minority and low-income communities are more likely to sell and advertise the most inexpensive and risky alternative tobacco products. Potentially less risky, non-combusted products such as smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes are more accessible in higher income and predominantly White neighborhoods. (2018-12-03)

Vapers can avoid relapsing to smoking, even after the odd cigarette
New research finds vapers can avoid relapsing back into smoking, even after the odd cigarette. While vapers may occasionally have the odd smoking lapse, they don't see it as 'game over' for their quit attempt and it doesn't have to lead to a full relapse. The findings suggest that vaping encourages not just smoking cessation, but long-term relapse prevention. (2018-11-28)

No clear evidence that diverting patients from emergency departments curbs overcrowding
There's no clear evidence that diverting patients, who are not seriously ill, away from emergency departments, in a bid to curb overcrowding, is either safe or effective, reveals research published online in Emergency Medicine Journal. (2018-11-27)

Steroid synthesis discovery could rewrite the textbooks
Steroids are essential molecules for life in all complex organisms such as animals and plants. Researchers from the VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology, the University of Technology Sydney Climate Change Cluster and the University of Queensland have now discovered a new central enzyme in the steroid biosynthesis pathway in some modern organisms. This might not only lead to an evolutionary 'rethink' but also opens new ways to control toxic algae in aquaculture. (2018-11-26)

Songbirds set long-distance migration record
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the 10-gram weight category -- with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometers or longer to reach their destination. (2018-11-15)

UMN researchers discover important connection between cells in the liver
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have made a discovery which could lead to a new way of thinking about how disease pathogenesis in the liver is regulated, which is important for understanding the condition nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is incredibly common and growing. It is apparent that about 30 percent of Americans and are at risk to advance to more severe conditions such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, cardiovascular disease, or even liver cancer. (2018-11-15)

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