Current Amblyopia News and Events

Current Amblyopia News and Events, Amblyopia News Articles.
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New study finds antidepressant drug effective in treating "lazy eye" in adults
In a new study, published in Current Biology, researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine reveal how subanesthetic ketamine, which is used for pain management and as an antidepressant in humans, is effective in treating adult amblyopia, a brain disorder commonly known as ''lazy eye.'' (2020-09-30)

School-based vision screening programs found 1 in 10 kids had vision problems
A school-based vision screening program in kindergarten, shown to be effective at identifying untreated vision problems in 1 in 10 students, could be useful to implement widely in diverse communities, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191085. (2020-07-20)

Early visual experience drives precise alignment of cortical networks for binocular vision
Researchers identify three distinct cortical representations that develop independent of visual experience but undergo experience-dependent reshaping, an essential part of cortical network alignment and maturation. (2020-05-18)

Study probing visual memory, amblyopia unveils many-layered mystery
Scientists pinpionted the role of a receptor in the plasticity underlying the degradation of vision in the common childhood condition amblyopia, but expected that receptor would play a bigger role in layer 4 of the visual cortex. (2019-12-13)

Bright lights outdoors may help treat lazy eye in children
Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is a loss of vision that affects two to five percent of children across the world and originates from a deficit in visual cortical circuitry. Against current models, SUNY Optometry researchers demonstrate that amblyopia affects the ON visual pathway more than the OFF, a finding that could have implications for new amblyopia treatments targeted at strengthening a weak ON visual pathway. (2019-06-17)

Study suggests lazy eye associated with children's sense of self-perception
This observational study looked at whether the condition known as 'lazy eye' (amblyopia) was associated with an altered sense of self-perception in children (ages 3 to 7) and whether any differences in self-perception were associated with deficiencies in vision and fine motor skills like coordination. Researchers report that among 60 children with lazy eye, the condition was associated with lower measures of self-perception for peer acceptance and physical competence compared with 20 healthy children. (2019-02-14)

Findings on eye-signal blending re-examines Nobel-winning research
Knowing precisely where the signals meet and the brain processes them is vital to treating amblyopia, or reduced vision in one eye because the brain and eye aren't working together properly. (2019-01-17)

A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement, researchers say
Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. How the brain does this is a mystery. (2018-12-27)

Does having 'lazy eye' affect a child's self-esteem?
Academic performance, interactions with peers, and athletic ability are factors connected to self-esteem in school children. This study of children in the third to eighth grades looked at whether the condition 'lazy eye' or amblyopia, where one eye has reduced vision due to misalignment or blur, was associated with lower self-perception by children of their competence, appearance, conduct and self-worth.  (2018-11-15)

Summer birth and computer games linked to heightened short-sight risk in childhood
Summer birth and hours spent playing computer games are linked to a heightened risk of developing short or near sightedness (myopia) in childhood, indicates a twin study, published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2018-11-06)

Abnormal vision in childhood can affect brain functions
A research team has discovered that abnormal vision in childhood can affect the development of higher-level brain areas responsible for things such as attention. (2018-10-12)

CHOP researchers develop easy-to-implement predictive screening tool for retinopathy
A multi-hospital collaboration led by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found a simple method of determining which premature infants should be screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). (2018-07-12)

Certain eye conditions in children may affect performance on timed, standardized tests
Children with eye conditions commonly referred to as lazy eye and crossed eyes were slower at marking answers on multiple-choice answer forms typically used in timed, standardized tests. (2018-06-14)

Normal eye dominance is not necessary for restoring visual acuity in amblyopia
Research published today, led by Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UofL Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, may lead to changes in how amblyopia is treated, particularly in adults. The research shows that eye dominance and visual acuity are controlled by different areas of the brain, and that one can be corrected without correcting the other. (2018-06-07)

Augmented-reality technology could help treat 'lazy eye'
When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or 'lazy eye.' New research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce this visual discrepancy as they go about everyday activities. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2017-12-05)

Virtual reality users must learn to use what they see
A UW-Madison study found that when most people put on a virtual reality headset, they still treat what they see like it's happening on any run-of-the-mill TV screen. (2017-12-04)

Recommendations vary for vision screening in young children
The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends vision screening at least once in all children 3 to 5 years of age to detect amblyopia (also known as 'lazy eye') or its risk factors (a B recommendation); and concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of vision screening in children younger than 3 years (an I statement). The report appears in the Sept. 5 issue of JAMA. (2017-09-05)

Training can improve athletes' stereo vision
Stereo vision allows individuals to perceive depth differences in their surroundings. Important to pedestrians and drivers, for example, depth perception plays a key role in many sporting activities. (2017-07-05)

Dressmakers found to have needle-sharp 3-D vision
Haute couture can be credited for enhancing more than catwalks and red carpets. New research from the University of California, Berkeley suggests that the 3D or 'stereoscopic' vision of dressmakers is as sharp as their needles. (2017-06-14)

How the visual cortex changes from birth to old age
A study of post-mortem brain tissue reveals the human primary visual cortex (V1) develops gradually throughout life. The research, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, may help to explain why the structure of this part of the brain matures in the first years after birth while vision continues to change throughout the lifespan. (2017-05-29)

Vision keeps maturing until mid-life
The visual cortex, the human brain's vision-processing centre that was previously thought to mature and stabilize in the first few years of life, actually continues to develop until sometime in the late 30s or early 40s, a McMaster neuroscientist and her colleagues have found. (2017-05-29)

Everyone has different 'bad spots' in their vision
The ability to distinguish objects in peripheral vision varies significantly between individuals, finds new research from UCL, Paris Descartes University and Dartmouth College, USA. For example, some people are better at spotting things above their center of vision while others are better at spotting things off to the right. (2017-04-10)

UofL researcher receives grant to study methods to restore depth perception
Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, has received the Disney Award for Amblyopia Research in the amount of $100,000 from Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB). McGee will use the award to investigate approaches for improving recovery from amblyopia, or 'lazy eye.' (2016-11-14)

iPad game effective in treating common eye condition in children
A special type of iPad game was effective in treating children with amblyopia (lazy eye) and was more effective than the standard treatment of patching, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology. (2016-11-10)

Waterloo vision scientists discover potential treatment for adults with lazy eye
A new treatment for adults with lazy eye, a condition previously thought to be treatable only in childhood, is one step closer as a result of research from the University of Waterloo in Canada and Sun Yat-sen University in China. (2016-02-22)

Physical activity may leave the brain more open to change
Learning, memory, and brain repair depend on the ability of our neurons to change with experience. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Dec. 7 have evidence from a small study in people that exercise may enhance this essential plasticity of the adult brain. (2015-12-07)

Amblyopia, not strabismus, identified as key contributor to slow reading in school-age children
Children with amblyopia, commonly known as 'lazy eye,' may have impaired ocular motor function. This can result in difficulties in activities for which sequential eye movements are important, such as reading. A new study conducted at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest determined that children with amblyopia read more slowly than children with normal vision or with strabismus alone. Their findings are published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. (2015-11-23)

Programmable electronic glasses provide children effective, digital lazy eye treatment
Programmable digital glasses for lazy eye work as well as eye patching, a study shows, improving vision by about two lines on the reading chart after three months. It is the first new effective lazy eye treatment in 50 years. (2015-11-14)

3-D map of the brain
The animal brain is so complex, it would take a supercomputer and vast amounts of data to create a detailed 3-D model of the billions of neurons that power it. But computer scientists and a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Utah have developed software that maps out a monkey's brain and more easily creates a 3-D model, providing a more complete picture of how the brain is wired. (2015-10-22)

Watching movies helped improve vision in children with amblyopia
The concept of binocular dysfunction, in which the brain suppresses the image from the weaker eye in favor of the stronger eye, has motivated new approaches to amblyopia treatment. In a new report published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, researchers describe how the use of dichoptic therapy, which presents different images to each eye separately, combined with popular children's movies, has produced improved visual acuity in young children. (2015-10-15)

'Lazy eye' may bully the brain into altering its wiring
As the brain develops its preference for the dominant eye's input, it alters its connections to the weaker eye, according to a study Bas Rokers and colleagues published this week in a special edition of the journal Vision Research. (2015-08-25)

Researchers pinpoint where the brain unites our eyes' double vision
Using prisms and an advanced brain scanner, the University of Wisconsin's Bas Rokers and collaborators at Utrecht University in the Netherlands have found the point in the human brain -- very early in image processing in the visual cortex -- in which the transformation to a cyclopean view of the world takes place. (2015-07-23)

Vision screening in preschool-aged children: Benefit and harm still unclear
No new screening studies were identified in an update search. The only new treatment study provided no evidence for a benefit of an earlier start of treatment. (2015-06-30)

Good eyes but poor vision: An indistinct world for 1 in 20
Amblyopia is caused not by organic damage to the eyes but by the brain incorrectly fitting together the images the eyes provide. As a result, the ability to see an object in sharp fo-cus is severely limited. This occurs in more than one in 20 of the German population, as Heike M. Elflein et al. show in a recent original article in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. (2015-06-05)

Genes may influence leadership in the workplace, research finds
A Kansas State University researcher has found that the dopamine transporter gene DAT1 can have both positive and negative effects on leadership in the workplace. (2015-05-19)

UCI neurobiologists restore youthful vigor to adult brains
They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. The same can be said of the adult brain. Its connections are hard to change, while in children, novel experiences rapidly mold new connections during critical periods of brain development. (2015-05-18)

Researchers develop new computer-based vision screening test for young children
Many eye disorders in young children are asymptomatic and may remain undetected without testing. Since effective treatments are available for many of those conditions, early identification and intervention are critical to prevent potentially permanent vision problems. A new report published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus describes the effectiveness of a new computer-based vision-screening test, the Jaeb Visual Acuity Screener, which is suitable for use in schools and pediatrician's offices. (2015-04-28)

Rise in spring allergens linked to increased dry eye cases
New ophthalmology research from the University of Miami shows that dry eye strikes most often in spring, just as airborne allergens are surging. The study marks the first time that researchers have discovered a direct correlation between seasonal allergens and dry eye, with both pollen and dry eye cases reaching a yearly peak in the month of April. (2015-04-23)

Pac-Man instead of patch: Using video games to improve lazy eye, depth perception
Scientists have created video games that add an important element of fun to the repetitive training needed to improve vision in people -- including adults -- with a lazy eye and poor depth perception. (2014-11-19)

Visualizing plastic changes to the brain
Tinnitus, migraine, depression, Alzheimer's: all these are examples of diseases with neurological causes, the treatment and study of which is more and more frequently being carried out by means of magnetic stimulation of the brain. However, the method's precise mechanisms of action have not, as yet, been fully understood. The work group headed by Dr. Dirk Jancke from the Institut für Neuroinformatik was the first to succeed in illustrating the neuronal effects of this treatment method with high-res images. (2014-09-04)

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