Current American Dietetic Association News and Events

Current American Dietetic Association News and Events, American Dietetic Association News Articles.
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Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Exercise-based cardiac rehab added to stroke recovery improved strength, cardiac endurance
In a small study, stroke survivors who completed a three-month cardiac rehabilitation program focused on aerobic exercise significantly improved their physical endurance and strength. Six months after the program more, 83.3% of participants reported that they continued exercising at least once a week. (2021-01-27)

Smoking directly linked to a higher risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage
The relationship between smoking and risk of a serious type of bleeding stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) appeared to be linear, with risk of SAH increasing significantly among people considered heavy smokers. People with genetic variants that predisposed them to smoking behaviors have an increased risk of SAH by more than 60%. (2021-01-14)

Statins may protect the heart from chemotherapy treatment of early breast cancer
Women who take statins, the common cholesterol-lowering medication, during chemotherapy with anthracyclines for early-stage breast cancer are half as likely to require emergency department visits or hospitalization for heart failure in the 5 years after chemotherapy. (2021-01-06)

Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone
People who smoked traditional cigarettes in addition to using e-cigarettes experienced health effects as harmful as those who smoked cigarettes exclusively; those effects are associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease and death. In a large data analysis of more than 7,100 U.S. adults, researchers examined the association of cigarette and e-cigarette use with inflammation and oxidative stress as biomarkers predicting cardiovascular disease. (2021-01-04)

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease. The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease. The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy. (2020-12-17)

Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems in the US
Significant racial disparities exist in heart-related complications among pregnant and postpartum women in the United States. Despite improvements in recent years, Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems. Clinicians treating pregnant women should be aware of the heart risks associated with pregnancy and should closely monitor women who are at increased risk. (2020-12-16)

Science leaders issue clarion call for evidence-based policy
Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, US science leaders and others have expressed frustration with the lack of an informed and coherent federal response, a sentiment that echoes objections to the handling of other pressing issues, such as climate change. Writing in BioScience, past presidents of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) have issued an appeal for the reinvigoration of sound policy and governance through the careful consideration of sound science. (2020-12-08)

LGB adults may be less likely to take statins to prevent heart disease
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease than non-LGB adults. Yet, LGB adults who have diabetes or high cholesterol are less likely than non-LGB adults to use statins, which help prevent cardiovascular events such as heart attacks. There is an urgent need for prevention programs aimed at reaching at-risk LGB adults to increase knowledge about the benefits of statins. (2020-12-02)

Meningococcus B vaccine prevents disease with 79 per cent effectiveness in under-18s
Meningococcus group B, the most prevalent strain of meningococcal infection, is prevented with 79 per cent effectiveness in children and young adults inoculated with the 4CMenB vaccine, also known as Bexsero, according to a new collaborative study from researchers in Portugal and the UK and led by the University of Bristol which evaluated the vaccine's performance in a real-world setting. The findings are published today [1 December] in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-12-01)

New medication helps heart health in people with chronic kidney disease, Type 2 diabetes
Results of a large, international clinical trial on the novel medication finerenone indicate it reduced the rate of death, heart attack, stroke and hospitalization for heart failure among patients with chronic kidney disease and Type 2 diabetes. Finerenone helped patients with chronic conditions improve their heart health, regardless of if they had a history of cardiovascular disease. (2020-11-17)

Newer blood thinner plus aspirin reduced stroke risk by 27% in patients with heart plaque
Patients who suffered a 'warning stroke' were less likely to have another stroke or die within 30 days if treated with a combination of aspirin and a newer blood thinner, ticagrelor. Researchers say that for patients with minor stroke treated within 24 hours of symptom onset, clinicians should consider the combination of ticagrelor plus aspirin to prevent a subsequent stroke. (2020-11-17)

Healthy sleep habits help lower risk of heart failure
Healthy sleep habits are associated with a lower risk of heart failure. Adults with the healthiest sleep patterns (morning risers, sleeping 7-8 hours a day and no frequent insomnia, snoring or excessive daytime sleepiness) experienced a 42% reduction in the risk of heart failure compared to those with unhealthy sleep patterns. (2020-11-16)

Preventing heart disease should be a priority for people with Type 2 diabetes
Even when risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are optimally controlled, adults with Type 2 diabetes still have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to the general population, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation. (2020-11-16)

STRENGTH trial finds new fish oil medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events
A medication derived from fish oil, containing the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, was evaluated in a large, international study of more than 13,000 people who had existing heart disease or who were at high risk of heart disease due to other medical conditions. The medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events compared to a corn oil-based placebo in the STRENGTH trial. (2020-11-15)

Intravenous iron reduced rehospitalization risk in people with heart failure
Iron deficiency is present in about 50% of people with chronic heart failure. Patients with heart failure who also have iron-deficiency are more likely to have poor outcomes. Intravenous iron replacement with ferric carboxymaltose reduced the risk of heart failure hospitalizations in patients with iron deficiency after an episode of acute heart failure. (2020-11-13)

Women veterans with PTSD have higher rate of heart disease
Women veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were 44% more likely to develop ischemic heart disease including heart attacks, compared to those without PTSD. The increased risk was most prominent in younger women (below the age of 40). (2020-11-09)

High blood pressure complications in US pregnancies have nearly doubled
Researchers found high blood pressure complicated about 80,000 pregnancies in 2018, nearly twice as many as in 2007. Women living in rural areas continue to be approximately 20% more likely to have high blood pressure before pregnancy than women living in urban communities. (2020-11-09)

U.S.-born Black women at higher risk of preeclampsia than Black immigrants
Black women born in the United States have a higher risk of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy, a condition known as preeclampsia, compared to Black women who immigrated to the country. In this study of Black women in Boston, those who were not born in the U.S. had a 27% lower risk of preeclampsia, compared to Black women born in America. The risk increased for Black immigrants after they lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years. (2020-11-09)

Healthy habits are key to maintaining health even while taking multiple prescriptions
A healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking contribute to maintaining overall health regardless of how many medications a person takes. Although a patient might be taking multiple prescriptions for various conditions to maintain their health, a healthy lifestyle is an important factor for decreasing the risk of death from any cause. (2020-11-09)

Calories by the clock? Squeezing most of your calories in early doesn't impact weight loss
Time-restricted eating, which restricts eating to specific hours of the day, did not impact weight among overweight adults with prediabetes or diabetes. Adults in the 12-week study ate the same healthy, pre-prepared foods, however, one group ate the bulk of their calories before 1 p.m. each day, versus the other group that ate 50% of their calories after 5 p.m. (2020-11-09)

Flu vaccine rate less than 25% in young adults with heart disease, despite increased risk
In 2018, only about 25% of adults between the ages of 18 and 34 with any cardiovascular disease received a flu shot, and in those with a history of a heart attack, only about 20% were vaccinated. Study authors hope their results will increase awareness among cardiologists, primary care physicians and the public about the protective benefits of flu vaccination. (2020-11-09)

People who eat chili pepper may live longer?
Consumption of chili pepper may reduce the relative risk of cardiovascular disease mortality by 26%, according to an analysis of diet and mortality data from four large, international studies. Chili pepper consumption was associated with a 25% reduction in death from any cause and 23% fewer cancer deaths, compared to people who never or only rarely consumed chili pepper. (2020-11-09)

Higher fitness levels linked to lower AFib risk in male, African American veterans
Higher fitness levels reduced the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm, known as atrial fibrillation or AFib, by 30% to 50% in a study of male, African American veterans. Although only male, African American veterans were included in the study, researchers note the results suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing AFib among all adults. (2020-11-09)

Many transgender people who receive hormone therapy have unaddressed heart disease risks
Many transgender people who receive gender-affirming hormone therapy have heart disease and stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, even during young adulthood. Of those known to have CVD risk factors, many were not previously treated to lower their heart disease risk. (2020-11-09)

Machine learning helps predict survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Machine learning predictions about the survival rate of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were more accurate when neighborhood-level factors were added to the data analysis. Future research can use this newly developed model to identify neighborhood-level intervention methods to decrease death rates from an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (2020-11-09)

Acute exposure to higher ozone levels linked to higher risk of cardiac arrest
Analysis of data from 187,000 patients found that higher ozone levels were associated with a higher risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. These findings may have important public health implications for recommendations on ozone regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2020-11-09)

Extra precautions during CPR due to the pandemic do not have a negative impact on survival
A U.S. medical center compared outcomes of patients in 2019 and 2020 who had in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to determine if safety precautions due to the pandemic affect patient survival. Researchers analyzed results of COVID-19 patients who had experienced in-hospital CPR and compared them to patients without COVID-19 who had experienced in-hospital CPR and found no significant difference in patient outcomes between the groups. (2020-11-09)

Lung scans for stroke patients could provide earlier COVID-19 detection
Examination of the lungs via computed tomography angiogram (CTA) scans helped researchers screen for and detect COVID-19 earlier than traditional nasal swab tests in acute stroke patients. Using CTA scan results in combination with COVID-19 symptom questionnaires, researchers were able to detect COVID-19 with 83% accuracy. (2020-10-29)

Smokers, especially those who begin young, are three times more likely to die prematurely
A large, national study found that smokers faced nearly three times the risk of dying prematurely from heart disease or stroke. Risk was higher among smokers who began before age 15 compared to those who began at older ages, and the risk was highest of all for those who began smoking before age 10. Those who quit smoking by or well before age 40 can reduce their risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease by 90%. (2020-10-28)

Weight-reduction surgery for severely obese adults may prevent second heart attack, death
Adults with severe obesity (BMI >35) and a prior heart attack who undergo weight-reduction surgery may lower their risk of a second heart attack, major cardiovascular event, heart failure and death. The effect weight-reduction surgery had on the patients' weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and A1C (a Type 2 diabetes marker) seems to play a role in decreasing the risk of heart attack and death. (2020-10-26)

Insights into the genetic architecture of penicillin allergy
In a study presented at the ASHG 2020 Annual Meeting, researchers found that thehistocompatibility complex gene HLA-B in penicillin allergy. (2020-10-26)

Report finds COVID-19 rate among dentists is less than one percent
Fewer than one percent of dentists nationwide were found to be COVID-19 positive, according to a first-of-its-kind report in the US based on data collected in June 2020. (2020-10-15)

Low risk of COVID-19 infection found among people with congenital heart disease
Results of a retrospective analysis suggest that people born with a heart defect who developed COVID-19 symptoms had a low risk of moderate or severe COVID-19 infection, according to a new article published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association. (2020-10-14)

'I'll sleep when I'm dead': The sleep-deprived masculinity stereotype
In the United States, the average American sleeps less than the minimum seven hours of sleep per night recommended by the Center for Disease Control, and nearly half of Americans report negative consequences from insufficient sleep. This problem appears to be especially prevalent in men, who report getting significantly less sleep, on average, than women. (2020-09-29)

Stroke alarm clock may streamline and accelerate time-sensitive acute stroke care
An interactive, digital alarm clock may speed emergency stroke care, starting at hospital arrival and through each step of the time-sensitive treatment process. The alarm clock is a low-cost strategy for streamlining stroke care and could translate to fewer deaths and less disability from stroke. (2020-09-24)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

Smoking linked to bleeding in the brain in large, long-term study of twins
Researchers in Finland found a link between smoking and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a type of bleeding stroke, in a study of more than 16,000 pairs of twins over 42 years. The study found that bleeding in the brain can be explained to a greater degree by environmental risk factors, such as smoking, than by genetic influence. (2020-09-17)

Heart transplants from severely obese donors show comparable outcomes for patients
An analysis of more than 26,000 heart transplant patients found that recipients of hearts from donors with severe obesity had similar post-transplant outcomes to recipients with non-obese donors. Nearly 40% of US adults are obese, and the prevalence of severe obesity has doubled over the past 15 years. (2020-09-16)

Shorter rest periods yield same results when measuring blood pressure
Current guidelines recommending five minutes of rest before a patient can receive a blood pressure screening may not be necessary for patients without high blood pressure. Average differences in blood pressure measurements obtained after zero or two minutes of rest were not significantly different (<+2 mm Hg) than readings obtained after five minutes of rest in people with systolic blood pressure <140 mm Hg. These findings illustrate the possibility for improvement in blood pressure screening efficiency, especially in busy health care settings. (2020-09-10)

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