Current American Society News and Events

Current American Society News and Events, American Society News Articles.
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A new type of university is emerging to meet the challenges of today
A new type of university is emerging, one that steps beyond the American research university model and is nimble and responsive, takes responsibility for what happens outside its walls and can scale up to meet the demands and challenges of modern society. Arizona State University President Michael Crow says they are part of the ''fifth wave'' of universities. (2021-02-09)

Addressing breastfeeding disparities for African American mothers
An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the US, a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time. (2021-02-08)

Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (2021-01-19)

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha. (2020-12-17)

Science leaders issue clarion call for evidence-based policy
Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, US science leaders and others have expressed frustration with the lack of an informed and coherent federal response, a sentiment that echoes objections to the handling of other pressing issues, such as climate change. Writing in BioScience, past presidents of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) have issued an appeal for the reinvigoration of sound policy and governance through the careful consideration of sound science. (2020-12-08)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

New study finds largest population increase among US adult electronic cigarette users is in younger adults that have never smoked combustible cigarettes
A new study from the American Cancer Society assessed trends between 2014 and 2018 in the prevalence of e-cigarette use and population count of e-cigarette users, according to combustible cigarette smoking histories, in younger (18-29 years), middle-aged (30-49 years), and older (?50 years.) U.S. adults. (2020-10-05)

Significant decline in prescription opioid abuse seen among Americans at last
Almost 20 years into the opioid epidemic, there finally is evidence of significant and continual decreases in the abuse of these risky pain medications, according to an analysis of national data being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Researchers zero in on genetic connection to postpartum hemorrhage
Researchers have identified genetic mutations that appear to protect women from severe bleeding after childbirth, a leading cause of maternal death. A preliminary study of the findings is being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Face masks unlikely to cause over-exposure to CO2, even in patients with lung disease
New research findings contradict statements linking wearing face masks to carbon dioxide poisoning by trapping CO2. During the COVID-19 pandemic the wearing of face masks has become a highly political issue with some individuals falsely claiming that wearing face masks may be putting people's health at risk. The study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society shows otherwise. (2020-10-02)

How does this blue flower tea change color? (video)
Maybe you've seen a beautiful, color-changing tea on social media. Chances are, it's butterfly pea flower tea. This week, we're investigating what allows it to shift from one vibrant color to the next, and Sam and George play around to see how many different colors they can get. (2020-09-28)

Hypercoagulability in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
In this AJR article, 82 patients with COVID-19 who underwent abdominal ultrasound or CT were retrospectively compared with 82 patients without COVID-19 for thromboembolism and solid-organ infarction. Nine (11%) patients with COVID-19 had thromboembolic findings, with medium to large arterial thrombi in five. One patient without COVID-19 had known portal vein thrombus on CT. Thromboembolic findings occurred more frequently in patients with than without COVID-19 (p = 0.02). (2020-09-24)

American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2020-08-27)

Black individuals at higher risk for contracting COVID-19, according to new research
Results of an analysis published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19. The average age of all participants in the study was 46. However, those infected were on average 52 years old, compared to those who tested negative, who were 45 years old on average. (2020-07-09)

Goodbye Northwestern Crow, hello Mexican Duck
The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's Checklist of North and Middle American Birds, published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species, including the addition of the Mexican Duck and the removal of the Northwestern Crow. The official authority on the names and classification of the region's birds, the checklist is consulted by birdwatchers and professional scientists alike and has been published since 1886. (2020-06-30)

Countries with early adoption of face masks showed modest COVID-19 infection rates
Regions with an early interest in face masks had milder COVID-19 epidemics, according to a new letter-to-the-editor published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-06-24)

Societies issue guide to safely resume cardiovascular procedures, diagnostic tests
The American College of Cardiology together with other North American cardiovascular societies has issued a framework for ethically and safely reintroducing invasive cardiovascular procedures and diagnostic tests after the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The document was published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-05-04)

Framework on how to safely resume essential cardiovascular diagnostic and treatment care during the COVID-19 pandemic, from the AHA and 14 North American cardiovascular societies
The American Heart Association, together with 14 cardiovascular societies in North America, today issued joint guidance, 'Safe Reintroduction of Cardiovascular Services during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Guidance from North American Society Leadership,' to outline a systematic, phased approach to safely reintroducing cardiovascular procedures for diagnosis and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-04)

Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE. (2020-04-30)

Clinicians treating COVID-19 say don't rush to try novel therapies
Intensivists caution against the use of premature novel therapies in lieu of traditional critical care principles in patients with COVID-19 in a recent correspondence letter in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. (2020-04-27)

Coronavirus Vaccine: Where are we and what's next? (video)
You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle. What exactly is being tested? How much longer will these tests take? And when can we expect a vaccine against the novel coronavirus? We chat with Benjamin Neuman, Ph.D., one of the world's experts on coronavirus, and Daniel Wrapp, one of the scientists who mapped the structure of the protein that the coronavirus uses to infect your cells, to help us answer these questions: https://youtu.be/gDY8pH6OWBc. (2020-04-03)

The value of diagnostic testing for SARS-CoV-2: When, whom, what and how often to test?
New research published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, addresses the potential uses of two main types of tests SARS-CoV-2, nucleic acid amplification tests for viral RNA and antibody detection tests. (2020-03-28)

Some COVID-19 patients still have coronavirus after symptoms disappear
In a new study, researchers found that half of the patients they treated for mild COVID-19 infection still had coronavirus for up to eight days after symptoms disappeared. The research letter was published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-03-27)

Journal of the American Geriatrics society highlights 'ABCDs' of COVID-19 for older adults
The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) this week rushed to publication a special article describing critical points for combatting the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic for older adults and those in long-term care. (2020-03-27)

'Whiskey webs' are the new 'coffee ring effect'
Spilled coffee forms a ring as the liquid evaporates, depositing solids along the edge of the puddle. This 'coffee ring effect' has fascinated scientists for decades, but now a team says they have uncovered the mechanism behind an even more striking, web-like pattern that forms when drops of American whiskey dry up. The results, reported in ACS Nano, suggest that these distinctive 'whiskey webs' could someday be used to identify counterfeit spirits. (2020-03-25)

Wuhan study shows lying face down improves breathing in severe COVID-19
In a new study of patients with severe COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) hospitalized on ventilators, researchers found that lying face down was better for the lungs. The research letter was published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-03-24)

Can soap really 'kill' the coronavirus? (video)
Constantly being told to wash your hands? Us too. So we're diving into the chemistry behind why soap is so effective against viruses like the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. (2020-03-23)

How loneliness affects end-of-life experiences
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of Americans over age 50 years who died between 2004 and 2014, individuals who were characterized as lonely based on survey results were burdened by more symptoms and received more intense end-of-life care compared with non-lonely people. (2020-03-04)

Study finds disparity in critical care deaths between non-minority and minority hospitals
While deaths steadily declined over a decade in intensive care units at hospitals with few minority patients, in ICUs with large numbers of minority patients, there was less improvement, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-01-17)

Why did we give sailors and soldiers shark repellent that ... didn't work? (video)
People have been developing different forms of shark repellent for decades -- the military even issued a chemical shark repellent called 'Shark Chaser' to pilots, sailors, and astronauts(!) from the end of World War II through the start of the Vietnam War. Thing is... it didn't really work. Learn why they bothered passing it out -- or even created it in the first place: https://youtu.be/4u54c7cRAog. (2020-01-13)

Recent screening rose among people under 50 after release of new colorectal guidelines
Recent colorectal cancer screening rates more than doubled among people ages 45 to 49 in the months after the release of updated American Cancer Society guidelines recommending screening in that age group. (2019-12-18)

Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science. As 2019 draws to a close, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the year's biggest stories in chemistry, top research trends and important developments in a special issue. In addition, the magazine makes some bold predictions for chemistry in 2020. (2019-12-18)

Scientist breaks down chemistry in iconic cartoons: SpongeBob SquarePants and Popeye
Are bananas actually that slippery? Could spinach give you superhuman strength? And what the heck is Toon Acid? This week, watch some cartoons alongside our writer and host, Sam Jones, and learn whether their chemistry checks out. (2019-12-16)

Electrochemistry amps up in pharma
Sparked by several high-profile reports, electrochemistry -- using electricity to perform chemical reactions like oxidation and reduction -- is gaining popularity in the pharmaceutical field. Some researchers have embraced the technology as a tool to synthesize compounds that are difficult or impossible to make using traditional chemical reagents, and to do so in a safer, more environmentally friendly way, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-11-06)

Following hospitalization for heart failure, home care lessens re-admission risk
A team of researchers studied the association between hospital readmission risk and receiving home health care after leaving skilled nursing facilities. To do so, they examined the records of Medicare patients, aged 65 and older, who had returned home from skilled nursing facilities following hospitalization for heart failure. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2019-11-04)

One in four oncologists fails to mention cost when discussing genomic testing
Nearly one in four oncologists discussing genomic testing with their patients rarely or never discusses the costs of testing, according to a new study led by American Cancer Society investigators. (2019-11-01)

Reversed halo signs manifest in septic pulmonary embolism due to IV drug use
According to an article published ahead-of-print in the January 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), reversed halo signs were frequently observed on the chest CT scans of patients with IV substance use disorder-related septic pulmonary embolism. (2019-11-01)

One in three pain patients suffer side effects after ketamine infusion therapy
As the opioid epidemic continues to devastate the United States, ketamine use has grown as a pain management alternative, yet more than one in three patients may experience side effects such as hallucinations and visual disturbances, suggests new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-21)

American Journal of Roentgenology finds no consensus on handling outside imaging studies
According to an ahead-of-print article published in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), there is 'no consensus' among academic radiologists regarding how to handle second-opinion consultations on outside studies. Developing best practices could help radiologists 'gain more clarity from a malpractice mitigation standpoint and have greater leverage with payers for appropriate reimbursement for their professional expertise.' (2019-10-04)

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