Current Americans News and Events

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First multi-whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans
In African Americans, the genetic risk landscape for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is very different from that of people with European ancestry, according to results of the first whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans. The authors say that future clinical research on IBD needs to take ancestry into account. (2021-02-19)

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills
Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average. (2021-02-18)

New recommendations aim to eliminate racial bias in myeloma trials
Recommendations designed to address the under-representation of African Americans in clinical trials for multiple myeloma (MM), a blood cancer that is twice as deadly in this demographic as in whites. (2021-02-18)

New report calls for universal coverage of long-term care for older adults in U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic's heavy toll on older Americans highlights the need to strengthen the nation's safety net for people in need of long-term services and supports, according to a new report published by Milbank Quarterly. The report proposes a system of universal coverage to support the long-term care of all older Americans. (2021-02-18)

Survey: Most Americans say they'll continue health precautions after COVID-19
A new national survey of more than 2,000 Americans by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds most plan to continue many of the pandemic precautions in the name of public health, even when the pandemic is over. (2021-02-08)

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Addressing power differences may spur advantaged racial groups to act for racial equality
When different groups of people come into contact, what's the key to motivating advantaged racial groups to join historically disadvantaged racial minority groups to strive for racial equality and social justice? It's a complex conundrum studied for years by social scientists like Linda Tropp, professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2021-02-02)

Majority skeptical healthcare costs will fall anytime soon as Biden begins presidency
In his inaugural address, President Biden vowed that 'help is on the way' to a nation grappling with a pandemic that has already claimed over 420,000 lives and counting. However, despite the promise of a better future, a new survey from West Health and Gallup finds Americans remain largely skeptical that issues as varied as managing the COVID-19 crisis, lowering healthcare costs, improving the economy, fixing immigration and addressing climate change, will improve anytime soon. (2021-01-28)

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer
The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer - the cancer that killed beloved 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman at only 43. (2021-01-21)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

Study: Black Americans, women, conservatives more hesitant to trust COVID-19 vaccine
A survey of approximately 5,000 Americans suggests that 31.1 percent of the US public does not intend to get the COVID-19 vaccine once it becomes available to them - and the likelihood of vaccine refusal is highest among Black Americans, women and conservatives. (2021-01-06)

Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
Many Americans have lost their jobs or are working less because of the shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic. A survey that has been tracking a representative sample of Americans over the course of the pandemic finds that the financial struggles of many families are growing worse. (2020-12-17)

UC Study: Suicide watch more important now than ever
The study, conducted at UC's Center for Prevention Science, found that between 2015 to 2018, there was a 16% increase in suicide ideation, an 18.6% increase in suicide planning, and an 11.6% increase in suicide attempts. Additionally, significant increases in each behavior were found in African Americans, younger adults, sexual minorities, and individuals who reported past-year drug use. Among these higher-risk groups, the largest increases in suicidal behaviors were African Americans. (2020-12-16)

New research points to effective ways to increase support for addressing ec
Researchers have found that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue and to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality. (2020-12-14)

People who purchased firearms during pandemic more likely to be suicidal
People who purchase a firearm during the pandemic are more likely to be suicidal than other firearm owners, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-11-17)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Suffering in silence: two-thirds of older adults say they won't treat their depression
A new nationwide poll, the GeneSight Mental Health Monitor, shows that nearly two-thirds (61%) of Americans age 65 or older who have concerns about having depression will not seek treatment. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 (33%) seniors who are concerned they might be suffering from depression believe they can ''snap out'' of it on their own. (2020-11-16)

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided. Potentially preventable hospitalizations are costly and can negatively impact the health and well-being of individuals, particularly if they are older. (2020-11-10)

Attending an HBCU may protect Black students from later health problems
African Americans who attend Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs) may be at lower risk for health problems later in adulthood compared to African Americans who attend predominantly white institutions, a new study suggests. (2020-11-09)

Health care use drops during pandemic; switch to telemedicine creates disparities
One of the first studies to quantify the cuts in elective medical care experienced in March and April found that the number of mammograms and colonoscopies dropped by more than 65% during the period. Lower rates of telemedicine use were observed among patients who reside in lower-income or predominately non-white zip codes. (2020-11-05)

Mobile phones help Americans encounter more diverse news
Researchers at the Annenberg School for Communication analyzed the news consumption of tens of thousands of Americans over a five-year period on desktop computers, tablets, and mobile phones. They found that contrary to conventional wisdom, mobile devices expose Americans to a much greater variety of news, diversifying the stories that people encounter and their expanse of information sources. (2020-11-02)

For Black LGBQ+ Americans, intersectional experiences can hurt -- or help, YSPH study finds
Using a new method for quantifying intersectional experiences, a new Yale School of Public Health study finds that Black LGBQ+ Americans tend to feel better about themselves after encountering events that affirm their identity. (2020-10-30)

Two million lost health coverage, thousands died prematurely in Trump's first 3 years
A new Harvard study finds that even before COVID-19, more than 2 million individuals lost health coverage during the first three years of the Trump Administration. This contraction of coverage since 2016 caused as many as 25,180 excess deaths, even before the pandemic. If the Supreme Court overturns the Affordable Care Act, the researchers estimate that nearly 20 million Americans would lose coverage, resulting in up to 68,000 excess deaths. (2020-10-29)

Americans agree: improving our public health system is an urgent priority
As COVID-19 infections escalate, Americans across the political divide demonstrate pronounced support for public health. According to a recently-commissioned survey by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to address our nation's commitment to science, a strong bipartisan majority of Americans place an urgent or high priority on improving our nation's public health system (78%) (2020-10-29)

Study documents racial differences in US hospice use and end-of-life care preferences
In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services. (2020-10-28)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

New national poll: young Americans favor reforms
The time has come for reform on how the United States deals with the electoral process, the environment and social justice, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion that takes an in-depth look at the views of Americans age 18 to 39. (2020-10-21)

Study reveals why some blame Asian Americans for COVID-19
A blend of racial prejudice, poor coping and partisan media viewing were found in Americans who stigmatized people of Asian descent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. But it was prejudice against Asian Americans that was most strongly linked to beliefs that Asians were responsible for the pandemic and most at risk for spreading it, results showed. (2020-10-20)

Efficacy, politics influence public trust in COVID-19 vaccine
If an initial COVID-19 vaccine is about as effective as a flu shot, uptake by the American public may fall far short of the 70% level needed to achieve herd immunity, new Cornell research suggests. (2020-10-20)

Non-obese Vietnamese Americans are 60% more likely to have diabetes
A new study has found that Vietnamese-American adults who were not obese were 60% more likely to have diabetes than non-obese, non-Hispanic, White Americans, after accounting for age, sex, sociodemographic factors, smoking history and exercise level. (2020-10-16)

Lack of diversity among cardiovascular health-care professionals continues
Despite working for more than two decades to address underrepresentation of women in cardiology, disparities among cardiovascular professionals continue to exist. Profound inequities also exist for individuals underrepresented in medicine, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans, who constitute 32 percent of the U.S. population but only eight percent of practicing cardiologists (2020-10-13)

Majority of Americans trust Biden to lead US healthcare system amid COVID-19 pandemic
Ability to manage the pandemic and reducing healthcare costs are equally important to Americans in determining their vote for president. (2020-10-08)

Survey shows broad bipartisan support for a stronger focus on science
A recent survey commissioned by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to assess America's commitment to science shows overwhelming support for science across political parties. A strong majority of Americans agree that ''the COVID-19 pandemic is a disruptive event and requires urgent refocusing of America's commitment to science.'' (2020-10-08)

Poll: Americans' views of systemic racism divided by race
In the wake of outrage across the nation and racial justice protests spurred by the deaths and injuries of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other Black Americans, more than half of Americans believe policing in the country is not fair, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-23)

From carbon taxes to tax breaks, emission reduction policies have widespread support
As the general election nears amid a historic season of hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves, a new survey finds that majorities of Americans are supportive of climate change mitigation measures. This suggests that policymakers can introduce legislation that would enjoy public approval--including a green stimulus package to help deal with the economic downturn associated with COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

USC/Princeton study finds middle-aged americans report more pain than the elderly
Middle-aged Americans report more pain than the elderly. Pain is more prevalent among the two-thirds of U.S. adults without a four-year college degree. (2020-09-21)

Interim data from early US COVID-19 hotspot show mortality and seriousness of disease were not associated with race/ethnicity
A study of interim data from two hospitals in an early US COVID-19 hotspot, to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September), shows that race and ethnicity were not significantly associated with higher in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, and that rates of moderate, severe, and critical forms of COVID-19 were similar between racial and ethnic groups. (2020-09-17)

Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds
Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus. (2020-09-10)

Amid fire and flood, Americans are looking for action
A new survey reveals how Americans feel about adaptation and prevention policies to combat wildfires and floods in the face of climate change. (2020-09-08)

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