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Current Amino Acid News and Events, Amino Acid News Articles.
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Treatment of Parkinson's disease: Separating hope from hype
This review emphasized the development of various non-pharmaceutical therapeutic approaches and mainly highlighted the cutting-edge treatments for PD including gene- and stem cell-based therapies, targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors, and brain stimulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). (2018-12-26)

Regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism by galanin-like peptide (GALP)
Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is composed of 60 amino acid residues and its sequence is highly homologous across species. GALP is produced in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and has diverse physiological effects such as the regulation of feeding, energy metabolism, and reproductive behavior. In this review article, the researchers summarize their recent research focusing on the mechanism whereby GALP regulates feeding and energy metabolism. (2018-12-24)

How dietary fiber and gut bacteria protect the cardiovascular system
The fatty acid propionate helps defend against the effects of high blood pressure, including atherosclerosis and heart tissue remodeling, a study on mice has found. Gut bacteria produce the substance -- which calms the immune cells that drive up blood pressure -- from natural dietary fiber. (2018-12-21)

Prospect. & struct. insight, binding plant-deriv. molecule of leea indica; inhibitor bace-1
Unveiled the lupeol as a potent BACE1 inhibitor from a manually curated dataset of Leea indica molecules, which may provide a new dimension of designing novel BACE1 inhibitors for AD therapy. (2018-12-19)

Preventing concrete bridges from falling apart
A new study published in EPJ B examines the adverse effects of the adsorption of natural gas constituents found in our environment -- and mixtures of several such gases -- into one of the materials that make up concrete: cement hydrate. The author found that the preservation of concrete infrastructure from the corrosive effects would require effective pre-treatment. (2018-12-19)

Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone
A newly discovered protein could help detect, target, and collect lanthanides, rare-earth metals used in smartphones, from the environment. (2018-12-19)

Scientists program proteins to pair exactly
Proteins designed in the lab can now zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks. This technique provides scientists a precise, programmable way to control how protein machines interact. (2018-12-19)

A new way to use CRISPR
CRISPR allows scientists to precisely target and edit DNA within living cells, which could help them correct anomalies that cause inherited diseases. A UD Team has now developed a method to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to set off a cascade of activities in cells, a phenomenon known as conditional gene regulation. (2018-12-18)

Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a relative of HIV-1
Researchers used NMR to detail how the matrix domain of the Avian Sarcoma Virus Gag protein binds to certain phospholipids. These phospholipids are vital for Gag protein binding to the plasma membrane of a cell, as the virus replicates and takes its first step toward virus formation and budding. ASV is widely used as a model to study mechanisms of HIV infection and replication. (2018-12-18)

Folate deficiency creates hitherto unknown problems in connection with cell division
Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with DNA replication than researchers had hitherto assumed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in a new study. Once a person lacks folate, the damage caused by this cannot be reversed. The researchers therefore encourage people to be more aware of the level of folate in the blood. (2018-12-14)

Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants
According to a recent study published in the journal Science Advances, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere. (2018-12-14)

Ebola-fighting protein discovered in human cells
Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection. 'What we envision is a small molecule drug that mimics this human protein and could be used in response to an Ebola virus outbreak.' (2018-12-13)

What's behind smelly wine
Aging often improves the flavor of wine, but sometimes the beverage emerges from storage with an unpleasant smell. One of the prime culprits is hydrogen sulfide, which can give the affected wine an aroma of sewage or rotten eggs. In a report in ACS' >Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers have now identified some potential sources of this stinky compound. (2018-12-12)

Light-induced modification of a carboxylic acid with an aminocyclopropenone
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in The Journal of Organic Chemistry that carboxylic acids, functional groups contained in biomolecules, drugs, and materials can be readily modified by light-induced organic reactions using an aminocyclopropenone. This discovery opens up new pathways for carboxylic acid modification with potential applications including determination of drug target proteins, elucidation of protein function, and synthesis of functionalized polymer materials. (2018-12-12)

Preparation, characterization of major degradation products of Pralatrexate injection
The major degradation products of pralatrexate drug product formed under hydrolytic and light stress conditions were identified, synthesized and characterized using advanced spectroscopic techniques such as NMR, HR-MS and IR. (2018-12-12)

UMN researchers give new insight to muscular dystrophy patients
New research by University of Minnesota scientists has revealed the three dimensional structure of the DUX4 protein, which is responsible for the disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Unlike the majority of genetic diseases, FSHD is not caused by a protein that is missing or not functioning properly. Rather it is caused when a functioning, normal, protein shows up in a place where it doesn't belong (in muscles). (2018-12-12)

Yale chemists find a new tool for understanding enzymes -- Google
In a new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, chemistry professor Victor Batista and his colleagues used the Google algorithm PageRank to identify key amino acids in the regulation of a bacterial enzyme essential for most microorganisms. (2018-12-11)

Using machine learning to design peptides
Northwestern, teaming up with Cornell University and the University of California, San Diego, developed a way of finding optimal peptide sequences: using a machine-learning algorithm as a collaborator. The algorithm analyzes experimental data and offers suggestions on the next best sequence to try, creating a back-and-forth selection process that reduces time needed to find the optimal peptide. The results, published in Nature Communications, could provide a new framework for experiments across materials science and chemistry. (2018-12-10)

Proteins for making tough rubber
Inspired by nature, Chinese scientists have produced a synthetic analogue to vulcanized natural rubber. Their material is just as tough and durable as the original. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, they reveal the secret to their success: short protein chains attached to the side-chains of the polymer backbone ensure stable physical cross-linkage and give the material a ''self-reinforcing'' effect under strain. In contrast to conventional rubbers, it is much easier to recycle. (2018-12-10)

News about a plant hormone
The plant hormone jasmonic acid also performs a function that was previously unknown. It ensures that the leaf pores close when leaves are injured. For the plant, this could be an emergency signal. (2018-12-07)

MIT engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug
MIT engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells. (2018-12-07)

AMNOG as a learning system: New study on ingenol mebutate in AK shows added benefit
Following a negative G-BA decision due to a lack of data in 2013, the drug manufacturer now presented a suitable, albeit very short study. (2018-12-06)

Pot withdrawal eased for dependent users
A new drug can help people diagnosed with cannabis use disorder reduce withdrawal symptoms and marijuana use, a new Yale-led study published Dec. 6 in the journal Lancet Psychiatry shows. (2018-12-06)

A versatile method for the protection of carbonyl compounds by camphorsulfonic acid
In this paper, camphor sulfonic acid-catalysed protection of various carbonyl compounds is developed. This method is simple, environmentally friendly and yields products in high yields. (2018-12-05)

Type 2 diabetes: A therapeutic avenue is emerging
Restoring the action of insulin is one of the keys to fighting type 2 diabetes. Researchers from Inserm led by Dominique Langin at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases (Inserm/Université de Toulouse) are developing a therapeutic strategy that uses the properties of an enzyme (hormone-sensitive lipase) which, when stimulating fatty-acid synthesis in the fat cells, has a beneficial effect on insulin action. This research has been published in Nature Metabolism. (2018-12-05)

New Parkinson's disease drug target revealed through study of fatty acids
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has provided insights into the role of fatty acids and suggests that inhibiting a specific enzyme can protect against neurotoxicity. (2018-12-04)

Not in the DNA: Epigenetics discovered in single-celled archaea
Researchers have reported the first experimental evidence of epigenetics in the single-celled organisms known as archaea. The simplicity of archaea -- combined with the fact that their cells resemble eukaryotes' in some important ways -- may allow researchers to investigate epigenetic questions in humans much faster and more easily than was possible before, the authors say. (2018-12-03)

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers. (2018-12-02)

Sweet lysine degradation
The researchers from the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at the University of Konstanz have gained fundamental new insights into the degradation of the amino acid lysine -- carcinogenic oncometabolites as intermediate products (2018-11-29)

Soil compound fights chronic wasting disease
A major compound in soil organic matter degrades chronic wasting disease prions and decreases infectivity in mice, according to a study published Nov. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Judd Aiken of the University of Alberta, and colleagues. (2018-11-29)

Scientists direct bacteria with expanded genetic code to evolve extreme heat tolerance
Scripps Research scientists have shown that synthetic bacteria with expanded genetic codes can evolve proteins in the laboratory with enhanced properties using mechanisms that might not be possible with nature's 20 amino acid building blocks. Exposing bacteria with an artificially expanded genetic code to temperatures at which they cannot normally grow, the researchers found that some of the bacteria evolved new heat-resistant proteins that remain stable at temperatures where they would typically inactivate. (2018-11-28)

Camphorsulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction of indoles with enones
Michael addition reaction is one of the most important and widely used reactions for making carbon-carbon or carbon-hetero bonds in organic synthesis. The reaction involves a facile attack of nucleophile to enone in a conjugated manner across a carbon-carbon double bond. The researchers herein report an expeditious camphor sulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction for the synthesis of different 3-substituted indole derivatives at room temperature. (2018-11-28)

Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts
Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts -- especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies -- testing methods are needed to reliably authenticate the nuts' country of origin. Researchers now report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that NMR analysis could fill the bill. (2018-11-28)

91 percent response rate for venetoclax against newly diagnosed AML in older adults
Clinical trial results published in the journal Nature Medicine and being presented this weekend at the American Society for Hematology Annual Meeting show 91 percent response rate to the combination of venetoclax with azacitidine in older adults newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Of 33 patients given combination venetoclax and azacitidine, 20 experienced a complete response (aka complete remission) and eight experienced a complete response but with continued low blood counts. (2018-11-28)

How changing labs revealed a chemical reaction key to cataract formation
Researchers working to understand the biochemistry of cataracts have made a surprising finding: A protein that was long believed to be inert actually has an important chemical function that protects the lens of the eye from cataract formation. (2018-11-27)

Gut microbiota-derived D-serine protects against acute kidney injury
Gut microbiota-derived metabolites play important roles in health and disease. In this study, we show the pathophysiological role of D-serine in association with the gut microbiota in humans and mice with acute kidney injury. The results demonstrate the renoprotective effects of D-serine derived from the gut microbiota, shed light on the interactions between the gut microbiota and the kidney, and highlight D-serine as a potential new therapeutic target and biomarker for acute kidney injury. (2018-11-26)

Mere sunlight can be used to eradicate pollutants in water
Advances in environmental technology: You don't need complex filters and laser systems to destroy persistent pollutants in water. Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new process that works using mere sunlight. The process is so simple that it can even be conducted outdoors under the most basic conditions. The chemists present their research in the journal Chemistry -- a European Journal. (2018-11-26)

Effort clarifies major branch of insect tree of life
The insects known as Hemiptera are not a particularly glamorous bunch. This group includes stink bugs, bed bugs, litter bugs, scale insects and aphids. Their closest relatives are thrips, bark lice and parasitic lice. But these insects together make up one of the twiggiest branches of the tree of life. A new study uses molecular data to tease out their family relationships and evolutionary history. (2018-11-26)

Citrate-based biomaterial fuels bone healing with less rejection
A material based on a natural product of bones and citrus fruit, called citrate, provides the extra energy that stem cells need to form new bone tissue, according to a team of Penn State bioengineers. Their new understanding of the mechanism that allows citrate to aid in bone regeneration will help the researchers develop slow-release, biodegradable, citrate-releasing scaffolds to act as bone-growth templates to speed up healing in the body. (2018-11-26)

Leukemia epigenetics in focus
Some severe forms of leukemia develop because proteins on the epigenetic level lose their regulative function. Now, in a broad international collaboration, UK researchers have identified molecules that can effectively inhibit the dysregulated proteins. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers report the discovery, design, and testing of potential drugs on the cellular level. The findings set the stage for new biological experiments and cancer treatment approaches in the future. (2018-11-22)

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