Current Amino Acids News and Events

Current Amino Acids News and Events, Amino Acids News Articles.
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Research shows people with high omega-3 index less likely to die from COVID-19
Researchers with the Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) and collaborators at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and in Orange County, CA, have published the first direct evidence that higher omega-3 blood levels may reduce risk for death from COVID-19 infection. The report was published in the journal Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids on January 20, 2021. (2021-01-26)

A new mechanism protects against cancer cell migration and neuron hyperexcitability
G3BP proteins inhibit the metabolic driver MTOR - a signaling protein that plays a central role in tumor diseases and developmental disorders of the brain. This is reported in this week´s issue of the renowned journal Cell. The study was led by scientists from the University of Innsbruck and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in collaboration with the Medical University of Innsbruck and a Europe-wide research network. (2021-01-25)

Protein anchors as a newly discovered key molecule in cancer spread and epilepsy
Certain anchor proteins inhibit a key metabolic driver that plays an important role in cancer and developmental brain disorders. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the University of Innsbruck, together with a Europe-wide research network, discovered this molecular mechanism, which could open up new opportunities for personalized therapies for cancer and neuronal diseases. They published their results in the journal Cell. (2021-01-25)

The liver processes coconut oil differently than rapeseed oil
Coconut oil has increasingly found its way into German kitchens in recent years, although its alleged health benefits are controversial. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now been able to show how it is metabolized in the liver. Their findings could also have implications for the treatment of certain diarrheal diseases. The results are published in the journal Molecular Metabolism. (2021-01-25)

Anti-freeze for cell membranes
Mosses and flowering plants took different genetic routes to evolve a similar defense mechanism. (2021-01-25)

New perspectives challenge the idea that saturated fats cause heart disease
Why do saturated fats increase blood cholesterol, and why should this be dangerous? After all, saturated fats occur naturally in a wide variety of foods, including breast milk. (2021-01-22)

Vegan diet significantly remodels metabolism in young children
University of Helsinki researchers report a comprehensive pilot study on the metabolic effects of full vegan diet on young children. The study found vegan children to have remarkably altered metabolism and lower vitamin A and D status compared to children with no special diet. (2021-01-21)

Researchers develop a new approach to detect pancreatic cancer
A protein found commonly in human blood might help with the detection of hard-to-diagnose pancreatic tumours. Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Alfried Krupp Hospital in Essen and the University of Witten/Herdecke have developed approach using the protein's structure and its function as a proxy for this. In a first study in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, the team shows how its method can also be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumours. (2021-01-20)

Hope for a vaccination against Staphylococcus areus infections?
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) ranks among the globally most important causes of infections in humans and is considered a dreaded hospital pathogen. Active and passive immunisation against multi-resistant strains is seen as a potentially valuable alternative to antibiotic therapy. However, all vaccine candidates so far have been clinically unsuccessful. With an epitope-based immunisation, scientists at Cologne University Hospital and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now described a new vaccination strategy against S. aureus in the Nature Partner Journal NPJ VACCINES. (2021-01-20)

Inflamed environment is C. diff paradise
A new study shows that the inflammation caused by Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) infection gives the pathogen a two-fold advantage: by both creating an inhospitable environment for competing bacteria and providing nutrients that enable C. diff to thrive. (2021-01-19)

Fatty acid may help combat multiple sclerosis
The abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system can be triggered by the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue, according to a new Yale study. The finding suggests that dietary change might help treat some people with the autoimmune disease. (2021-01-19)

Researchers discover mechanism behind most severe cases of a common blood disorder
G6PD deficiency affects about 400M people worldwide and can pose serious health risks. Now, researchers think they've found the cause of the most severe cases, which could finally lead to treatments. (2021-01-19)

Sensei RNA: Iron fist in a velvet glove
Scientific pursuit has the habit of offering chance discoveries if we think about things differently. Here is a story behind one serendipitous discovery from the lab of Arati Ramesh at NCBS, Bangalore. (2021-01-18)

Moffitt researchers discover biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis
In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis. (2021-01-14)

Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds. (2021-01-14)

Algorithms designed to study language predict virus 'escape' mutations for SARS-CoV-2 and others
By bridging the conceptual divide between human language and viral evolution, researchers have developed a powerful new tool for predicting the mutations that allow viruses to 'escape' human immunity or vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block damaged or defective genes. Their study was published in the international academic journal Physical Review Letters (2021-01-14)

Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation. (2021-01-14)

Scientists modeled protein behavior of archaeal viruses to crack protein folding mystery
Scientists from the Pacific Quantum Center of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) figured out how the AFV3-109 protein with slipknot structure folds and unfolds depending on temperature. The protein is typical for the viruses of the oldest single-celled organisms that can survive in the extreme conditions of underwater volcanic sources - archaea. The research outcome appears in PLOS ONE. (2021-01-13)

Comprehensive characterization of vascular structure in plants
With funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, two teams of plant researchers and bioinformatics researchers under the leadership of Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have succeeded for the first time in identifying the functions of the different cell types in the leaf vasculature of plants. They present their fundamental findings in the current edition of the journal ''The Plant Cell''. (2021-01-12)

The odd structure of ORF8: Mapping the coronavirus protein linked to disease severity
A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells. The structural map - which is now published in the journal PNAS, but has been open-access for the scientific community since August - has laid the groundwork for new antiviral treatments and enabled further investigations into how the newly emerged virus ravages the human body. (2021-01-12)

New small antibodies show promising effects against COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed, in collaboration with researchers in Germany and the US, new small antibodies, also known as nanobodies, which prevent the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus from entering human cells. The research study, published in Science, shows that a combined nanobody had a particularly good effect - even if the virus mutated. According to the researchers, the nanobodies have the potential to be developed into a treatment for COVID-19. (2021-01-12)

Study identifies immune response biomarkers, novel pathways in four marine mollusc species
A new study involving the University of Maine assessed immune responses in four economically important marine mollusc species -- the blue mussel, soft-shell clam, Eastern oyster, and Atlantic jackknife clam -- and identified new biomarkers relating to changes in protein function involved in novel regulatory mechanisms of important metabolic and immunological pathways. (2021-01-12)

Johns Hopkins scientist develops method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts. (2021-01-12)

How the circadian clock regulates liver genes in time and space
EPFL scientists have carried out the first comprehensive study of how genes in the liver perform their metabolic functions in both space and time of day. Monitoring almost 5000 genes at the level of the individual cell across a 24-hour period, the researchers have modelled how the circadian clock and liver functions crosstalk throughout the day in sync with the feeding-fasting cycle. (2021-01-11)

Confined growth of ZIF-8 in organosilica nanoparticles to regulate mRNA translation
mRNA based technology is a hot topic particularly in light of the recent clinical trials of mRNA vaccines against COVID-19 pandemic. However, the hard-to-transfect nature in antigen presenting cells (APCs) has been a long-standing challenge for mRNA expression to proteins. Scientists in Australia developed dendritic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (DMONs) with ZIF-8 grown partially inside the mesopores. The resultant DMONs-ZIF-8 showed enhanced mRNA delivery efficiency and safety profile than commercial products and DMONs modified with a toxic polymer. (2021-01-09)

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories
Factor-pooling by ribosomes caught on video using state-of-art high-speed atomic force microscopy technology. (2021-01-08)

Antibiotic resistance from random DNA sequences
An important and still unanswered question is how new genes that cause antibiotic resistance arise. In a new study, Swedish and American researchers have shown how new genes that produce resistance can arise from completely random DNA sequences. The results have been published in the journal PLOS Genetics. (2021-01-08)

Possible explanation for more efficient maize growth
Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have investigated the transport of compounds in maize. They focused on the mechanism used to transport the products of photosynthesis for further distribution in the plant through its phloem loading pathways. In the current edition of the journal ''The Plant Cell'', they describe how this mechanism has potentially created a special evolutionary advantage for maize. (2021-01-08)

Sweat, bleach and gym air quality
One sweaty, huffing, exercising person emits as many chemicals from their body as up to five sedentary people, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study. And notably, those human emissions, including amino acids from sweat or acetone from breath, chemically combine with bleach cleaners to form new airborne chemicals with unknown impacts to indoor air quality. (2021-01-05)

In kefir, microbial teamwork makes the dream work
While scientists know that microorganisms often live in communities and depend on their fellow community members for survival, mechanistic knowledge of this phenomenon has been quite limited. Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory combined a variety of state-of-the-art methods to better understand the microbial communities. This revealed that cooperation allows the microbes to do something they can't do alone. (2021-01-04)

Supercapacitors challenge batteries
A team working with Roland Fischer, Professor of Inorganic and Metal-Organic Chemistry at the Technical University Munich (TUM) has developed a highly efficient supercapacitor. The basis of the energy storage device is a novel, powerful and also sustainable graphene hybrid material that has comparable performance data to currently utilized batteries. (2021-01-04)

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents. They are analogs of pesticides which are toxic and carcinogenic to humans, but the modifications allowed turning them into a powerful weapon against bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. (2020-12-29)

High-speed atomic force microscopy takes on intrinsically disordered proteins
Kanazawa University's pioneering high-speed atomic force microscope technology has now shed light on the structure and dynamics of some of life's most ubiquitous and inscrutable molecules - intrinsically disordered proteins. The study is reported in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-12-28)

How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells. (2020-12-22)

Enhanced scorpion venom molecules can be used to treat Chagas disease
Brazilian researchers tested the antichagasic properties of VmCT1, obtained from the venom of Vaejovis mexicanus, a scorpion harmless to humans, and synthesized novel analogs to redesign the native molecule (2020-12-21)

How cancers hurt themselves to hurt immune cells more
A study of melanoma cells explains a puzzling response they exhibit to ward off T cell attacks. (2020-12-20)

New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste. The study along with the new discovery has been published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (2020-12-17)

Fish oil supplements don't raise bad cholesterol
The Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) has published a new research paper in conjunction with The Cooper Institute on the omega-3s EPA and DHA in fish oil and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). (2020-12-17)

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