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Current Amino Acids News and Events, Amino Acids News Articles.
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Origami of the cell
A UCSB cell biologist shows that blocking a critical enzyme helps to mitigate diseases associated with protein folding and lipid stress. (2017-01-30)
Engineered intrinsically disordered proteins provide biomedical insights
Biomedical researchers have engineered the first examples of biomimetic structures composed from a mysterious class of proteins that lack any sort of internal structure. (2017-01-30)
Plant regulatory proteins 'tagged' with sugar
New work reveals that the process of synthesizing many important master proteins in plants involves extensive modification, or 'tagging' by sugars after the protein is assembled. (2017-01-30)
Diverse natural fatty acids follow 'Golden Mean'
Bioinformatics scientists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have discovered that the number of theoretically possible fatty acids with the same chain length but different structures can be determined with the aid of the famous Fibonacci sequence. (2017-01-27)
Sequencing poisonous mushrooms to potentially create medicine
A team of Michigan State University scientists has genetically sequenced two species of poisonous mushrooms, discovering that they can theoretically produce billions of compounds through one molecular assembly line. (2017-01-24)
New research on wine fermentation could lead to better bouquet
The taste of wine arises from a symphony of compounds that are assembled as yeast ferment the must from grapes. (2017-01-23)
Research helps explain how B cell metabolism is controlled
New research from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) addresses the lack of knowledge about how B cell metabolism adapts to each of their various environments -- development in the bone marrow, proliferation and hypermutation in the lymph nodes and spleen and circulation in the blood. (2017-01-23)
Insects and umami receptors
Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food. (2017-01-23)
Snap, digest, respire
Scientists show how the Venus flytrap uses its prey's nitrogen compounds to extract energy. (2017-01-20)
Seeking structure with metagenome sequences
In the Jan. 20, 2017 issue of Science, a team led by University of Washington's David Baker in collaboration with DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers reports that structural models have been generated for 12 percent of the protein families that had previously had no structural information available. (2017-01-19)
Study discusses model for understanding nutrition and brain development
For nearly a decade, researchers at the University of Illinois have studied the piglet as a translational model to understand which aspects of early brain development are affected by nutrition interventions. (2017-01-19)
'Collateral' lethality may offer new therapeutic approach for cancers of the pancreas, stomach and colon
Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. (2017-01-18)
Microbiologists make big leap in developing 'green' electronics
Microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have discovered a new type of natural wire produced by bacteria that could greatly accelerate the researchers' goal of developing sustainable 'green' conducting materials for the electronics industry. (2017-01-17)
Genetic mechanisms underlying phenotype convergence of pandas revealed
A research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, used comparative genomics to reveal the molecular mechanisms of convergent evolution in both pandas. (2017-01-17)
Protein isolated from baker's yeast shows potential against leukemia cells
An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. (2017-01-17)
New study refutes how fruit flies developed their tolerance for alcohol
Scientists from the University of Chicago, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the University of Wisconsin-Madison conducted experiments investigating whether a molecular change in an enzyme gave the Drosophila melanogaster fruit fly species its superior ability to metabolize alcohol. (2017-01-16)
CO2, the philosopher's stone to obtain valuable pharmaceuticals
Starting from readily available materials and CO2, ICIQ researchers prepare useful building blocks named 'cyclic carbonates' that can be converted into valuable pharmaceuticals like TamifluĀ®. (2017-01-13)
Simple fats and amino acids to explain how life began
Life is a process that originated 3.5 billion years ago. (2017-01-12)
Important bio-chemical produced on a large scale by E. coli
E. coli cells have now been engineered into producing large quantities of serine, which is used in detergents, tube feeding formula, and as building blocks for many important chemicals. (2017-01-11)
Looking for life in all the right places -- with the right tool
Researchers have invented a range of instruments from giant telescopes to rovers to search for life in outer space, but so far, these efforts have yielded no definitive evidence that it exists beyond Earth. (2017-01-11)
Manipulating signals in bacteria could reduce illnesses
The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated. (2017-01-11)
Study characterizes key molecular tool in DNA repair enzymes
Oxidative damage to a cell's DNA is constant and destructive and a complex suite of enzymes have evolved to repair and maintain it. (2017-01-06)
Investigators identify optimal conditions for growth of Legionella bacteria
The bacteria that cause Legionnaire's disease grow well in warm tap water installations with ample dissolved organic matter -- conditions that support the growth of biofilms. (2017-01-06)
Foods rich in resistant starch may benefit health
A new comprehensive review examines the potential health benefits of resistant starch, a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is therefore considered a type of dietary fiber. (2017-01-05)
'We could make that!' -- Chance meeting leads to creation of antibiotic spider silk
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at The University of Nottingham has developed a technique to produce chemically functionalized spider silk that can be tailored to applications used in drug delivery, regenerative medicine and wound healing. (2017-01-04)
Omega-3 supplements can prevent childhood asthma
Taking certain omega-3 fatty acid supplements during pregnancy can reduce the risk of childhood asthma by almost one third, according to a new study from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood and the University of Waterloo. (2016-12-29)
Lotus stir-fry scores high in consumer panels
A report details potential demand and consumer preference for fresh lotus rhizomes and products such as lotus salad, baked lotus chips, and lotus stir-fry. (2016-12-28)
Research reveals the importance of long non-coding RNA regulating cellular processes
Scientific research over the past decade has concentrated almost exclusively on the 2 percent of the genome's protein coding regions, virtually ignoring the other 98 percent. (2016-12-26)
Proteins at the movies
In research conducted at SACLA, Japan's XFEL (X-ray free electron laser) facility, membrane protein folding has been captured for the first time in 3-D and at a single-atom level. (2016-12-22)
Food supplement may be key to treatment of rare disease
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a popular food supplement called phosphatidylserine may be instrumental in reversing the detrimental effects of Familial Dysautonomia (FD), a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 1 in 31 Jewish people of Eastern European, or Ashkenazi, ancestry. (2016-12-21)
Novel technique helps ID elusive molecules
Stuart Lindsay, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, has devised a clever means of identifying carbohydrate molecules quickly and accurately. (2016-12-21)
Gelatin supplements, good for your joints?
A new study from UC Davis and the Australian Institute of Sport suggests that consuming a gelatin supplement, plus a burst of intensive exercise, can help build ligaments, tendons and bones. (2016-12-20)
Become soya- friendly
Damir Shafigulin, a post graduate student of RUDN University, decided to do innovative business. (2016-12-20)
Study finds ideal method to minimize waffle loss in industrial production
A study published in the December issue of Journal of Food Science found that waffles baked on steel plates at a high temperature for a short amount of time minimizes the likelihood egg waffle batter will stick to the plate. (2016-12-20)
Two major groups of rabies virus display distinct evolutionary trends
Using hundreds of viral genome sequences, scientists have shown that two major groups of rabies virus have unique evolutionary tendencies. (2016-12-15)
UT Southwestern scientists invent new way to see proteins in motion
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers developed a new imaging technique that makes X-ray images of proteins as they move in response to electric field pulses. (2016-12-15)
Carbonaceous chondrites shed light on the origins of life in the universe
A Spanish-Italian team led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has discovered that one type of meteorite known as carbonaceous chondrites are capable of synthesising organic compounds which are key to prebiotic chemistry. (2016-12-14)
Newly revealed amino acid function could be used to boost antioxidant levels
A Japanese research team has become the first in the world to discover that 2-aminobutyric acid is closely involved in the metabolic regulation of the antioxidant glutathione, and that it can effectively raise levels of glutathione in the body when ingested. (2016-12-13)
Anti-tumor synergy
Biocompatible nanocapsules, loaded with an amino acid and equipped with an enzyme now combine two anti-tumor strategies into a synergistic treatment concept. (2016-12-12)
Ancient enzyme morphed shape to carry out new functions in humans
New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals that a human enzyme has changed little from its days as a bacterial enzyme. (2016-12-09)
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