Current Ana News and Events

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New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

Electrical transmission lines have power to enhance habitat connectivity for wildlife
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Converting the ground under electrical transmission towers into spaces for wildlife can enable fragmented populations to connect with one another, increasing local biodiversity and providing animals around the globe an important tool for adapting to climate change, a new study found. (2021-02-19)

Peginterferon-lambda shows strong antiviral action to accelerate clearance of COVID-19
A clinical study led by Dr. Jordan Feld, a liver specialist at Toronto Centre for Liver Disease, University Health Network (UHN), showed an experimental antiviral drug can significantly speed up recovery for COVID-19 outpatients - patients who do not need to be hospitalized. This could become an important intervention to treat infected patients and help curb community spread, while COVID-19 vaccines are rolled out this year. (2021-02-05)

Toddlers who use touchscreens may be more distractible
New research published in Scientific Report highlights some of the effects regular use of touchscreens might have on toddlers. (2021-01-26)

Set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2
Provincial and territorial governments should set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in public and private settings, and should not leave this task to employers, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2021/01/19/cmaj.202755.full.pdf. (2021-01-19)

A CNIO study links severe COVID-19 disease to short telomeres
The data show that telomeres are shorter in patients suffering more severe COVID-19 pathologies. The researchers propose that one of the consequences of the viral infection is shortening of the telomeres, which, in turn, hampers the regeneration of lung tissue and causes prolonged sequelae in some patients. The study, published in the journal 'Aging', suggests the usefulness of a possible therapy for patients with post-COVID pulmonary injury based on activation of the enzyme telomerase. (2021-01-11)

Assessment of neutrophil extracellular traps in coronary thrombus of case series of patients with COVID-19
Severe COVID-19 is characterized by the intense formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), leading to the blockage of microvessels, as shown in pulmonary samples. The occurrence of ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a serious cardiac manifestation of COVID-19; the intrinsic mechanism of coronary thrombosis appears to still be unknown. This case series report of five patients sought to determine the role of NETs in coronary thrombosis in patients with COVID-19. (2020-12-29)

In liver, a stressed cell can be bad news for its neighbors
When a stressed liver cell starts communicating with its neighbors, it can send stress signals to neighboring cells, causing significant problems that can lead to fatty liver disease and metabolic disease. (2020-12-18)

Patients with COVID-19 and obesity have poor outcomes not driven by inflammation
Obesity is associated with poor COVID-19 outcomes but a new study suggests this is not due to increased inflammation, but instead may be driven by respiratory issues or other factors. (2020-12-16)

VRK1: a protein that reduces the survival of patients with neuroblastoma
Researchers have characterised the function of VRK1 in neuroblastoma tumour cells and have determined that this protein is essential for tumour cell growth and proliferation. ''By studying the expression of this protein in tumours, we were able to identify a priori patients where tumour progression is going to be worse, even in groups where current tools do not predict that behaviour,'' notes Francisco M. Vega. (2020-12-11)

Scientists peer into the 3D structure of the Milky Way
Scientists from Cardiff University have helped produce a brand-new, three-dimensional survey of our galaxy, allowing them to peer into the inner structure and observe its star-forming processes in unprecedented detail. (2020-12-03)

Scientists describe the role of a p53 target gene in lymphoma and lung cancer development
An international team of scientists has studied whether Zmat3 could have critical functions that p53, the most important gene in preventing cancer, uses to prevent cancer. Their findings have shifted the focus of how Zmat3 could function in tumor development. (2020-11-27)

Canadian discovery: A potential game-changer to reverse alcohol intoxication
In a study published today in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research Journal, a team of researchers led by Dr. Joseph Fisher presents a proof of concept of a simple method that could become a game-changer in rescue therapy for severe alcohol intoxication, as well as just ''sobering up.'' (2020-11-12)

An Amazonian tea stimulates the formation of new neurons
For centuries, indigenous societies in the Amazon have used ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic tea, for shamanic purposes. A research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid has shown that in animal models, this drink stimulates the formation of neurons and other brain cells, and thus offers a potential therapy for psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-06)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
A study from the University of Cordoba (Spain) analyzed degrees of acceptance, popularity and friendship at different stages of victimization in the field of school bullying (2020-10-21)

Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people in Portugal suggests. (2020-08-28)

Research challenges popular belief that 'unbridled ambition' costs female candidates votes
A new study into voter behaviour in the US and UK argues that electorates value aspiration and ambition among female candidates seeking office challenging common assumptions. (2020-08-19)

Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage. (2020-08-19)

New mechanism for stroke treatment shows successful proof-of-concept
Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the US; new research from UConn Health suggests a promising treatment for patients by successfully inhibited an important receptor implicated in post-stroke damage and recovery. (2020-08-19)

CNIO and CNIC find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development
In 1998, Spanish researcher Ana Losada, currently at CNIO, identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein essential for chromosome segregation in dividing cells. Today, we know that cohesin has a role in cancer * Cohesin is so important that it has been evolutionarily conserved for millions of years * Losada and Paco Real from CNIO, and Miguel Manzanares from CBMSO are publishing their recent findings on the role of cohesin in high-impact journal 'Cell Reports' (2020-08-11)

Eye-tracking tech helps aged care assessment
Memory loss among older Australians is on the rise as the Baby Boomer generation enters retirement - but a new technique tested by Flinders University researchers that investigates cognitive skills through eye-tracking technology may be used to help incorporate all older people's preferences into aged care policy and practice. (2020-08-03)

A new method is developed to extract antibiotic residue in food from animal sources
The procedure simplifies and cheapens the process to extract coccidiostats, medicine used to treat an intestinal illness in animals but that can cause health risks for humans at high doses (2020-07-29)

CNIC scientists discover the mechanism of competition between mitochondrial genomes coexisting
The study, published in Science Advances, reveals that cells can detect the presence of different mitochondrial genomes and select among them according to their effect on metabolic status (2020-07-29)

Scientists trace and identify origin of smallpox vaccine strains used in Civil War
Scientists and historians working at McMaster University, the Mütter Museum and the University of Sydney have pieced together the genomes of old viruses that were used as vaccination strains during and after the American Civil War ultimately leading to the eradication of smallpox. (2020-07-19)

Protein derived from tick saliva proves effective in the treatment of equine skin cancer
Experiments were conducted by scientists affiliated with the Center of Excellence in New Target Discovery, a research center supported by FAPESP, involving five animals with spontaneous skin tumors. (2020-06-29)

Analysing the effects two decades after a mining spill
There has been an important fall in the total concentrations and evolution of the metal fraction towards their more innocuous forms, so the environmental risk is much reduced. The samples were taken in the same locations and by the same research group twenty years later. Sediments were analysed from six locations on the River Guadiamar and its main tributaries, from the area of the Aznalcóllar mine to the gates of Doñana national Park. (2020-06-12)

Could we run out of sand? Scientists adjust how grains are measured
How we account for sand is important for understanding how reefs, atolls and coastal regions will cope with the effects of climate change. Scientists led by Ana Vila-Concejo from the University of Sydney discovered models for measuring sand were giving incorrect information and have developed more accurate engineering models. (2020-06-11)

Female researchers majorly under-represented in COVID-19 research
New research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found significant gender bias in research authorship relating to COVID-19, which means that women's views are not equally shaping the response to the pandemic. (2020-06-11)

Climate change: Warm springtime's unwelcome legacy
A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture. (2020-06-10)

First cases of COVID-19 in New York City primarily from European and US sources
In New York City, the first confirmed COVID-19 cases arose mostly through untracked transmission of the virus from Europe and other parts of the United States, a new molecular epidemiology study of 84 patients reports. (2020-05-29)

Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream
Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to the miners and communities near where mercury is used to extract gold from ore, but also to downstream communities hundreds of kilometers away where people eat mercury-contaminated river fish as part of their diet. Downstream children under 12 with the highest levels of mercury in their bodies were found to have lost IQ points and become anemic. (2020-05-28)

UHN-U of T-led study shows antiviral drug can speed up recovery of COVID-19 patient
An international team of researchers led by Dr. Eleanor Fish, emerita scientist at the Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, and professor in the University of Toronto's Department of Immunology, has shown for the first time that treatment with interferon-α2b may significantly accelerate recovery of COVID-19 patients. (2020-05-15)

Bizarre new species discovered... on Twitter
A new species of fungus has been discovered via Twitter and christened accordingly -- Troglomyces twitteri. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are behind the discovery of this unique fungal parasite that grows around the reproductive organs of millipedes. (2020-05-15)

Burning fat with brain-sparing amphetamines without harmful side effects
The team of Ana Domingos, principal investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) and Associate Professor of the University of Oxford, together with Gonçalo Bernardes, principal investigator at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular (IMM) and Reader at the University Cambridge, have modified amphetamine so that does not enter the brain while avoiding its known side effects. (2020-05-13)

Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats
An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread (2020-04-21)

Is autoimmunity on the rise?
A study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology provides evidence that the prevalence of autoimmunity -- when the immune system goes awry and attacks the body itself -- has increased in the United States in recent years. (2020-04-08)

Autoimmunity may be rising in the United States
Autoimmunity, a condition in which the body's immune system reacts with components of its own cells, appears to be increasing in the United States, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. In a study published April 8 in Arthritis and Rheumatology, the researchers found that the prevalence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), the most common biomarker of autoimmunity, was significantly increasing in the United States overall and particularly in certain groups. (2020-04-08)

A COVID-19 palliative care pandemic plan: An essential tool
Palliative care physicians have created a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) palliative care plan as an essential tool to provide care and help manage scare resources during the pandemic. The plan, which focuses on eight critical elements -- 'stuff,' 'staff,' 'space,' 'systems,' 'sedation,' 'separation,' 'communication' and 'equity' -- is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-03-31)

Eco-friendly biodiesel from palm oil?
Vegetable oil biofuels are increasingly used as an alternative to fossil fuels despite the growing controversy regarding their sustainability. In a study led by the University of Göttingen, researchers investigated the effect of palm-oil biodiesel on greenhouse gases for the entire life cycle. They found that using palm oil from first rotation plantations where forests were cleared for palms leads to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions compared to fossil fuels. The results were published in Nature Communications. (2020-02-27)

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