Current Anaemia News and Events

Current Anaemia News and Events, Anaemia News Articles.
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Simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer
New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives. (2021-01-18)

Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery - potentially leading to serious health consequences. (2020-12-16)

Iron deficiency can be managed better
Publishing in The Lancet, Australian and European researchers have released updated, evidence-based guidance for managing iron deficiency, a serious worldwide health problem. Iron deficiency is a major cause of anaemia, a lack of oxygen-carrying red blood cells or haemoglobin, which is experienced by two billion people worldwide, and can have serious long-term health consequences. Implementing the best practice diagnosing and managing iron deficiency would lead to significant long-term health benefits. (2020-12-04)

Iron infusion proves effective to treat anaemia in Rural Africa
Iron-deficiency anaemia is a major concern in low-income settings, especially for women. In a new study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and partners published yesterday in The Lancet Global Health, researchers found that iron infusion was feasible, safe and, in contrast to the standard iron-deficiency anaemia treatment of oral iron tablets, highly effective in Tanzania. This is the first study to provide evidence of the benefits and safety of iron infusion in a low-income setting. (2020-11-25)

Nobel Prize winner says scientific research has to be 'passion-driven'
Scientists cannot be expected to drop everything they're working on to turn their attention to beating COVID-19, according to the winner of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe. He delivers the the prestigious Michel Clavel lecture to the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online. (2020-10-22)

Preventive drugs halve malaria cases in African schoolchildren
Giving preventive drugs to school-age children in Africa substantially reduces malaria infections and cases of anaemia, according to a new study in The Lancet Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Researchers identify the mechanism behind bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified the mechanism behind bone marrow failure developing in children that suffer from Fanconi anaemia. (2020-10-14)

Genetic information can predict predisposition to rare and common blood diseases
Two large-scale genetic studies have identified the bulk of genetic variation that influences medically-important characteristics of our blood cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and colleagues from 101 research institutions world-wide, have studied hundreds of thousands of participants and identified over 7,000 regions of the human genome that control blood cell characteristics, such as the numbers of red and white cells. (2020-09-03)

Trial clarifies use of blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients
Restricting blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients to those with very low haemoglobin levels saves blood with no negative impact on clinical outcomes. That's the finding of the REALITY trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. Anaemia affects approximately 5-10% of patients with myocardial infarction and is an independent predictor of cardiac events and increased mortality. (2020-09-02)

EBMT trial shows improvements in treatment of Severe Aplastic Anaemia
The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), Europe's collaborative peer network of professionals working in the field of stem cell transplantation and cellular therapy, announced today the results of the phase III RACE trial during EBMTs virtual 46th Annual Meeting. Preliminary data show that adding Eltrombopag to standard immunosuppressive treatment is safe and increases response rates in patients with Severe Aplastic Anaemia (SAA). (2020-08-31)

Iron study combats anaemia with cutting-edge computer simulation
A new iron intervention study has determined which of the world's low-and-middle income countries would benefit from using iron-containing micronutrient powders to tackle childhood anaemia. (2020-08-04)

Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy
About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. Now, studies by ETH researchers show that iron deficiency also reduces the protection provided by vaccinations. (2020-07-28)

Using Epo against Covid-19
The doping agent erythropoietin could attenuate severe progression of COVID-19. (2020-07-06)

Ultra-precision nano-sensor could detect iron disorders
The University of Sydney's Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Research Unit and the Australian Research Centre for Innovative BioEngineeing have developed a hypersensitive nano-sensor to detect harmful 'free' iron disorders. The test could lead to earlier, more accurate disease diagnosis. (2020-04-28)

High ferritin levels may indicate severe COVID-19
Professor Yehuda Shoenfeld is Head of the Laboratory of the Mosaic of Autoimmunity at St Petersburg University and founder and Head of the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases (Israel). During the Cradle of Virology online conference, he spoke about the correlation between the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and high levels of ferritin. It turns out that elevated ferritin concentrations are associated with an increased production of special signalling molecules, which can lead to complications and death. (2020-04-22)

Investigation reveals £21 million NHS bill for avoidable deficiencies in heart failure
Nearly 109,000 beds are occupied due to frequent, unplanned hospital readmissions caused by treatable ID/IDA in HF. Disparity in care across England sees some patients spending 26 days in hospital, compared to eight days in other areas of the country, indicating inconsistency in the implementation of guidance. (2020-03-19)

Cracking the code for hookworm infestation
Monash University researchers have uncovered a key way that hookworms evade the immune system - providing new hope in the search for a vaccine. (2020-02-12)

Development of the immune system varies according to age, location and anaemia
Age and geographical location have the strongest influence on immune composition and vaccine responses, with anaemia having a considerable effect, according to a study co-led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), the Babraham Institute and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with the Manhiça Health Research Center (CISM). The results, published in Science Translational Medicine, will help improve the efficacy of early childhood vaccines in low-income countries. (2020-02-05)

Scientists show we don't need horses to treat diphtheria
A project taking the first steps towards ending the use of horses to treat diphtheria has succeeded. Funded by the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. and carried out at the Institute of Biochemistry, Biotechnology, and Bioinformatics at the Technische Universität Braunschweig in Germany, the project created human antibodies capable of blocking the poisonous toxin that causes diphtheria. The results were published Friday in Scientific Reports (a Nature research journal). (2020-01-21)

Gene therapy: Development of new DNA transporters
Scientists at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed new delivery vehicles for future gene therapies. A team of researchers led by Dr Christian Wölk are using artificial fats to transport DNA into cells. The scientists demonstrate how well this technique works in a study conducted in collaboration with pharmacists from the University of Marburg. The study has been published in 'Biomaterials Science'. (2019-11-18)

Scientists identify immune cells linked to malaria-induced anaemia through autoantibody production
An autoimmune attack on uninfected red blood cells likely contributes to anaemia -- a shortage of red blood cells -- in people with malaria, according to a new study published in eLife. (2019-11-12)

New technique to identify a common cause to TMA diseases for which there is a treatment
Researchers have developed a technique that allows detecting an anomaly in the alternative pathway of the complement system, a part of our immune system that if deregulated can attack the patient's own endothelial cells and cause thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a severe injury common to a diversity of diseases. If the pathway is altered, the drug that is used for a syndrome with good prognostic could be used in other range of TMA-related diseases. (2019-11-08)

Published a clinical guide for the genomic diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Chronic Myelomonocytic leukaemia
A collective work between researchers from 8 research centres and hospitals in Spain, coordinated by Francesc Solé of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute (IJC), and Esperanza Such, of the University and Polytechnic Hospital de la Fe describes the recommendations of use of the Next Generation genome Sequencing (NGS) in the diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML). (2019-11-04)

Engineered T cells may be harnessed to kill solid tumor cells
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a form of immunotherapy used to treat the blood cancer leukemia may be effective in treating other kinds of cancer as well. (2019-10-02)

When is a child an adult?
When does childhood end? That's the question international researchers are asking as they chart age cut-offs for paediatric services around the world. Adolescent Health Professor at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and the University of Melbourne Susan Sawyer says previous research has found that global health systems do not meet adolescents' needs, yet pediatricians are well placed to provide age-appropriate care to adolescents -- especially if they are trained in adolescent medicine. (2019-09-18)

Old cells, new tricks -- important clue to AML diagnosis and cure discovered
Around 22,000 people will be diagnosed this year in the US with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the second most common type of leukemia diagnosed in adults and children. Researchers from Australia's Monash University have discovered a key reason why this disease is so difficult to treat and therefore cure. (2019-08-01)

Higher iron levels may boost heart health -- but also increase risk of stroke
Scientists have helped unravel the protective -- and potentially harmful -- effect of iron in the body. (2019-07-16)

High on iron? It stops anaemia but has a downside
A global study looking at the role that iron plays in 900 diseases has uncovered the impact of both low and high iron levels -- and the news is mixed. (2019-06-20)

Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sickle cell disease moves a step closer
Sickle cell disease is a form of anemia that is inherited when both parents are carriers of a mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Currently, it can only be diagnosed in pregnancy by carrying out an invasive test that has a small risk of miscarriage and is therefore sometimes declined by parents. Now, researchers have developed a non-invasive prenatal test for the disease. (2019-06-14)

Blood transfusion during liver cancer surgery linked with higher risk of cancer recurrence and death
Receiving a blood transfusion during curative surgery for the most common type of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) is associated with a much higher risk of cancer recurrence and dying prematurely, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress. (2019-06-02)

Ancient feces reveal parasites in 8,000-year-old village of Çatalhöyük
Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms in the ancient inhabitants of Turkey shows whipworm infected this population of prehistoric farmers. (2019-05-31)

New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness. (2019-03-27)

Widely used malaria treatment to prevent malaria in pregnant women
A global team of researchers, led by a research team at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), are calling for a review of drug-based strategies used to prevent malaria infections in pregnant women, in areas where there is widespread resistance to existing antimalarial medicines. (2019-03-25)

The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health. (2019-03-12)

The Lancet: Disease, violence and inequality threaten more adolescents worldwide than ever before
In the first study to track recent global changes to adolescent health, published in The Lancet, researchers estimate that, compared with 1990, an additional 250 million adolescents in 2016 were living in countries where they faced a triple burden of infectious disease, non-communicable diseases including obesity, and injuries -- including from violence. (2019-03-12)

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases
Research explains details of a biological process that supports the production of healthy cells, by removing faulty proteins as they form. (2019-02-04)

Defective protein factories in disease
Ever since the 1960s, the medical world has wondered why some patients who suffer from illnesses resulting from inadequate cell division are much more susceptible to cancer which is conversely characterized by excessive cell division. The Laboratory for Disease Mechanisms in Cancer in Leuven, Belgium has now succeeded in unraveling the mechanism of how defective ribosomes can cause both insufficient and excessive cell division. (2018-11-28)

Aftermath of EU referendum linked to rise in antidepressant prescribing in England
Antidepressant prescribing in England rose relative to other types of drug in the immediate aftermath of the results of the European Union referendum in June 2016, when Britons voted in favor of Brexit, reveals research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2018-11-20)

UK Alabama rot risk may be linked to certain types of dog breed and habitat
The risk of contracting renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV), popularly known as Alabama rot, may be higher in certain types of dog breed and land habitat, indicate two linked studies published in this week's Vet Record. (2018-10-10)

Testosterone treatment over 10 years can improve or reverse type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone, and induce significant weight loss
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) reveals that in men with low testosterone who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), testosterone therapy can improve their disease and reverse its progress, and can also induce significant weight loss. (2018-10-02)

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