Current Anaesthesia News and Events

Current Anaesthesia News and Events, Anaesthesia News Articles.
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Study predicts UK COVID-19 vaccination program will very quickly reduce deaths but more slowly bring down hospital and ICU admissions
A new modelling study published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that the UK's coronavirus vaccination program is already reducing daily deaths. However, reductions of hospital and intensive care (ICU) admissions will likely take several weeks longer, with large reductions seen by the end of March and continuing into April. (2021-02-11)

Latest review shows intensive care mortality from COVID-19 continued to fall in 2020, but improvement is slowing
A meta-analysis of global studies published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that intensive care morality from COVID-19 has continued to fall since the start of the pandemic, but the improvement is slowing and may have plateaued. (2021-02-01)

COVID-19 intensive care mortality in Sweden lower than in many studies from other countries
New research reveals that the COVID-19 intensive care (ICU) mortality rate in Sweden was lower during the first wave of the pandemic than in many studies from other countries. (2021-02-01)

Global demand for cancer surgery set to surge
A new modelling study led by UNSW predicts demand for cancer surgery will rise by 52 per cent within two decades, with low-income countries bearing the greatest burden. (2021-01-24)

Children 'not scared' by PPE, says study
A new study from one of the UK's leading children's hospitals -Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool - shows that children are not scared by PPE, and can in fact feel reassured by it. (2021-01-21)

The Lancet and The Lancet Oncology: Global demand for cancer surgery set to grow by almost 5 million procedures within 20 years, with greatest burden in low-income countries
Demand for cancer surgery is expected to increase from 9.1 million to 13.8 million procedures over the next twenty years, requiring a huge increase in the workforce including nearly 200,000 additional surgeons and 87,000 anaesthetists globally. With access to post-operative care strongly linked to lower mortality, improving care systems worldwide must be a priority in order to reduce disproportionate number of deaths following complications. (2021-01-21)

Significant number of patients with sudden loss of consciousness need pre-hospital critical care
Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) in partnership with the University of Surrey has shown the benefits of dispatching HEMS to patients with a sudden, unexplained LOC of medical origin and a high prevalence of acute neurological pathology. (2021-01-07)

Vaccines must prevent infection, disease progression and transmission - in every country - to truly bring COVID-19 under control
An editorial co-authored by a member of the UK's influential SAGE committee that advises the UK Government on COVID-19, and published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) says that in order for the global COVID-19 vaccination program to be successful, the available vaccines must be able to do all three of: prevent infection becoming established in an individual, prevent disease progression and prevent onward transmission. (2020-12-14)

Unexpectedly, data show that anaesthetists and intensive care doctors are at lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with other medical staff
Following the first recorded death of an anaesthetist from COVID-19 in the UK in November 2020, a review of available data published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that unexpectedly, despite their perceived increased exposure to COVID-19 patients and high-risk procedures, anaesthetists and intensive care doctors appear to be at lower risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing COVID-19. (2020-12-11)

Doctors report unusual case of patient 'mirror writing' in the emergency room
In new research presented at Euroanaesthesia (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care [ESAIC]), doctors report a highly unusual case of a right-handed patient performing unconscious 'mirror-writing' with her left hand while in the midst of having epileptic seizures in the emergency room. (2020-11-27)

Spinal/epidural anesthesia associated with increased survival in leg artery bypass surgery
A new study published in The BMJ shows that people who had surgery to improve blood flow in their legs under spinal or epidural anesthesia were less likely to die than those who were given general anesthesia. (2020-11-25)

During COVID-19 first wave, the proportion of caesarean section deliveries done under
New research from north-west England published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that during the first wave of COVID-19, the proportion of caesarean section deliveries carried out under general anaesthesia approximately halved, from 7.7% to 3.7%. (2020-11-02)

New aerosol research indicates significantly less risk of COVID-19 transmission from
New research published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that these procedures may only produce a fraction of the aerosols previously thought, much less than would be produced during a single regular cough. This brings into question whether the procedures should be designated aerosol generating procedures and provides an opportunity to dramatically speed up surgery. (2020-10-06)

COVID ventilator patients can have permanent nerve damage
Severely ill COVID-19 patients on ventilators are placed in a prone (face down) position because it's easier for them to breathe and reduces mortality. But that life-saving position can also cause permanent nerve damage in these vulnerable patients, reports a new study. Scientists believe the nerve damage is the result of reduced blood flow and inflammation. Other non-COVID-19 patients on ventilators in this position rarely experience any nerve damage. (2020-09-11)

Benefits of inhaled nitric oxide therapy for pregnant patients with COVID-19
Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) can be a valuable adjunct respiratory therapy for pregnant women with severe and critical COVID-19. (2020-08-26)

New guidelines say breastfeeding is safe after anaesthesia
New guidelines published by the Association of Anaesthetists in the journal Anaesthesia, to coincide with the start of World Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August) say that breastfeeding is safe after the mother has had anaesthesia, as soon as she is alert and able to feed. (2020-07-31)

Look into the mirror
If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. And thanks to the work of scientists from the IPC PAS we can look into the depths of the cornea itself. And that without touching it! All thanks to the introduction of an innovative method of holographic optical tomography. (2020-07-24)

Lego builds anaesthesia skills according to new study
Lego could be used as a practical tool to train doctors in anaesthetic skills according to new research that has shown a simple task using the building bricks can help improve technical skills - a finding that could improve medical training and patient safety. (2020-07-21)

Study suggests overall COVID-19 intensive care mortality has fallen by a third since the start of the pandemic
A systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies from three continents published in the journal Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that overall mortality of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs) has fallen from almost 60% at the end of March to 42% at the end of May -- a relative decrease of almost one third. (2020-07-15)

Study shows that aerosol box used to protect healthcare workers during COVID
A new study shows that certain aerosol boxes of a similar type to those that have been manufactured and used in hospitals in the UK and around the world in order to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19 can actually increase exposure to airborne particles that carry the virus, and thus casts doubt on their usefulness. (2020-07-10)

Functional in silico dissection of the brain during the natural wake-sleep cycle
The human brain is a complex system comprising 1010 non-linear units (neurons) that interact in 1015 sites (synapses). Considering such an astonishing level of complexity and heterogeneity, it is surprising that the global dynamics of the brain self-organize into a discrete set of well-defined states. (2020-06-30)

RCSI begins clinical trial for potential drug therapy for severe COVID-19 infection
Clinician scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences have begun a clinical trial of a promising therapy for critically ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care. (2020-06-29)

Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may cut greenhouse gas emissions
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course of a year, and reported in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. (2020-06-16)

Study reveals impact of 'soft opt-out' system for organ donation
Research published in Anaesthesia suggests that a 'soft opt-out' system may increase consent rates for organ donation after death, which could boost the number of organs available for transplantation. (2020-05-06)

COVID-19: Australian research offers hope as world struggles with ventilator shortage
A world-first breakthrough by Australian researchers in ventilator splitting could help hospitals under severe stress as the number of critical COVID-19 cases continues to rise. (2020-04-13)

The 'purrfect' music for calming cats
Taking a cat to the vets can be a stressful experience, both for cat and owner. However, a study published in this month's issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery has shown that playing cat-specific music during the visit can help. (2020-02-24)

Simple injection of air proves successful in releasing child's tongue trapped in bottle, inspired by opening a wine bottle
A relatively simple injection of air has proved successful in releasing a 7-year-old boy's tongue that became entrapped in a juice bottle, says new research published in the latest edition of the European Journal of Anaesthesiology (the official journal of the European Society of Anaesthesiology). (2019-10-31)

Remove false teeth before general anesthetic, doctors warn
False teeth need to be taken out before a general anesthetic, doctors warn in the journal BMJ Case Reports after a 72-year-old's dentures got stuck in his throat during surgery to remove a harmless lump in his abdominal wall, and weren't discovered for eight days. (2019-08-12)

Major surgery associated with small, long term decline in brain functioning
Major surgery is associated with a small long-term decline in cognitive functioning -- equivalent, on average, to less than five months of natural brain aging, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2019-08-07)

Diabetes medications masking surgical complication
A new class of diabetes medications is masking the potentially dangerous condition of ketoacidosis at the time of surgery. Testing for acid load in the blood of diabetes sufferers who are taking gliflozin medications is needed in order to avoid complications associated with ketoacidosis - a potentially lethal build-up of acid in the blood. (2019-07-18)

New, noninvasive test for bowel diseases
Gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly prevalent worldwide, especially in industrialized countries. In 2015 alone, 250,000 people in the UK were diagnosed with IBD, and 3 million in the United States. Symptoms can include pain and swelling of the stomach, bloody diarrhea, weight loss and extreme tiredness. (2019-06-26)

High body fat (but not BMI itself) linked to four-fold increase in mortality risk after heart bypass surgery
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3, 2019) shows that mortality in patients who had undergone heart bypass surgery was over 4 times higher in individuals with a high body fat mass, while body mass index (BMI) by itself was not associated with an increase in mortality. (2019-06-02)

Virtual reality improves tolerance of anaesthesia procedures and reduces need for intravenous sedation by at least 50%
Giving patients virtual reality sessions before and during locoregional anesthesia for orthopedic procedures substantially reduces pain and the need for intravenous sedation, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3). (2019-06-01)

Wrong side surgical errors substantially underreported and totally preventable
Performing a procedure on the wrong side of a patient's body, although rare, may be more common than generally thought. More than 80 wrong side error (WSE) incidents were reported across 100 hospitals in Spain over the past decade, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3). (2019-05-31)

Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever life-long study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. (2019-05-21)

Woman with novel gene mutation lives almost pain-free
A woman in Scotland can feel virtually no pain due to a mutation in a previously-unidentified gene, according to a research paper co-led by UCL. She also experiences very little anxiety and fear, and may have enhanced wound healing due to the mutation, which the researchers say could help guide new treatments for a range of conditions, they report in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. (2019-03-27)

The Lancet Global Health: Maternal deaths following C-section 50 times higher in Africa compared to high-income countries
The maternal mortality rate following a caesarean section (C-section) in Africa may be 50 times higher than that of high-income countries, according to an observational study of more than 3,500 mothers from 22 African countries, published in The Lancet Global Health journal. (2019-03-14)

The Lancet: General anesthesia is unlikely to have lasting effects on the developing brains of young children
A single hour of general anaesthesia in early infancy -- longer than is necessary to perform the most common types of minor surgeries in childhood -- does not result in measurable neurodevelopmental or behavioral problems up to the age of 5 years, according to the first randomized trial of its kind involving 722 infants in seven countries, published in The Lancet. (2019-02-14)

Sleep deprivation may affect our genes
Sleep deprivation was associated with DNA damage in a new Anaesthesia study. (2019-01-24)

A new pharmacological molecule improves the safety of canine sedation and anaesthesia
Vatinoxan reduces the adverse effects on the cardiovascular system of pharmacological agents used for animal sedation and anaesthesia. Also, other drugs achieve their therapeutic effect faster when administered simultaneously with vatinoxan. (2018-10-31)

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