Nav: Home

Current Ancient Dna News and Events

Current Ancient Dna News and Events, Ancient Dna News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Researchers discover how three-dimensional organization of the genome regulates cell differentiation
A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School clarifies how the three-dimensional organization of the genome is regulated at the onset of skeletal muscle formation. (2019-05-24)
A Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli
Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. (2019-05-23)
Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment
Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science. (2019-05-23)
Tip sheet: Recent research on how DNA is read and copied
Two scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have unraveled aspects of how DNA organizes and preserves genetic information. (2019-05-22)
Ancient proteins offer clues to the past
Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. (2019-05-22)
Ancient toy inspires tool for state-of-the-art science
A 5,000-year-old toy still enjoyed by kids today has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered scientific tool that could not only impact how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments. (2019-05-22)
Cocktails with Cleopatra?
A team of scientists from Hebrew University, Israel's Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University create ancient alcohol from ancient yeast. (2019-05-22)
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (2019-05-21)
3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (2019-05-21)
BU researchers discover a new beneficial function of an ancient protein
Cell boundaries are made of lipids. When cells are severely damaged, these lipids need to be rapidly removed to avoid toxicity and facilitate tissue healing. (2019-05-21)
Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds
Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. (2019-05-21)
Life in evolution's fast lane
Most living things have a suite of genes dedicated to repairing their DNA, limiting the rate at which their genomes change through time. (2019-05-21)
River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese
The Han Chinese are the world's largest ethnic group, making up 91.6% of modern-day China. (2019-05-21)
High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize
Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize. (2019-05-20)
Nanoscale sculpturing leads to unusual packing of nanocubes
Brookhaven and Columbia scientists found that cubic nanoparticles surrounded by thick DNA shells pack in a never-before-seen 'zigzag' pattern. (2019-05-17)
Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease
Investigators at the University of British Columbia (UBC)/Centre for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics (CMMT) and BC Children's Hospital have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease. (2019-05-16)
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but by two Florida Museum of Natural History volunteers. (2019-05-16)
Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA
The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch. (2019-05-15)
Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago
Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic. (2019-05-15)
Yale study identifies how cancer drug inhibits DNA repair in cancer cells
According to researchers at Yale Cancer Center, a cancer drug thought to be of limited use possesses a superpower of sorts: It is able to stop certain cancer cells from repairing their DNA in order to survive. (2019-05-15)
How mutations lead to neurodegenerative disease
Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease. (2019-05-13)
Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. (2019-05-10)
Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy
An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland. (2019-05-10)
New efficient way to engineer nanostructures mimicking natural immune response complexes
Collaboration between Novo Nordisk and Professor Kurt Gothelf's laboratory at Aarhus University yields novel method to engineer large multi-antibody-like nanostructures using DNA nanotechnology. (2019-05-10)
Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc
The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. (2019-05-09)
Ancient DNA suggests that some Northern Europeans got their languages from Siberia
Most Europeans descend from a combination of European hunter-gatherers, Anatolian early farmers, and Steppe herders. (2019-05-09)
Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America
A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. (2019-05-09)
A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective drug delivery
Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to researchers at McGill University. (2019-05-09)
Freshwater mussel shells were material of choice for prehistoric craftsmen
An international team of researchers, including academics from the University of York, have discovered that 6000-years-ago people across Europe shared a cultural tradition of using freshwater mussel shells to craft ornaments. (2019-05-07)
Scientists pinpoint potential new target for regulating inflammation
The scientists discovered that an ancient protein (SARM) is a key regulator of inflammasomes -- tiny molecular machines that initiate the inflammatory response. (2019-05-07)
Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (2019-05-07)
Oxygen variation controls episodic pattern of Cambrian explosion: study
A multidisciplinary study, published on May 6, 2019 in Nature Geoscience by a joint China-UK-Russia research team, gives strong support to the hypothesis that the oxygen content of the atmosphere and ocean was the principal controlling factor in early animal evolution. (2019-05-07)
Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing
Unexpected interactions between mutations can be a thorn in the side for plant breeders. (2019-05-06)
Circulating tumor DNA gives treatment options for the most common ovarian cancer type
According to a new research, circulating tumor DNA can be used detect treatment options for ovarian cancer patients who don't benefit from chemotherapy. (2019-05-04)
Cancer cells have a problem with junk RNA that makes them vulnerable
The important role of the ADAR enzyme and junk RNA in cancer cells opens an entirely new playbook for the treatment of tumors, one that is focused on RNA rather than DNA. (2019-05-03)
New reading of the Mesha Stele inscription has major consequences for biblical history
Tel Aviv University archaeologists say that a new reading of the inscription on the Mesha Stele has major consequences for biblical history. (2019-05-02)
A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history
Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby. (2019-05-02)
Could mouth rinse to detect HPV DNA be associated with predicting risk of head/neck cancer recurrence, death?
Researchers examined if a mouth rinse to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA might be associated with helping to predict risk of recurrence of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death. (2019-05-02)
Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging
Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. (2019-05-01)
Genetic defect causing intellectual disability discovered by Sussex scientists
Researchers have discovered a new genetic defect which causes a form of intellectual disability; a finding which will improve global screening programs. (2019-05-01)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".