Current Anesthesia News and Events

Current Anesthesia News and Events, Anesthesia News Articles.
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Columbia researchers uncover altered brain connectivity after prolonged anesthesia
A body of evidence supports the association between prolonged anesthesia and cognitive impairment, but the Columbia study is first to address the effect of the procedure on neural connections. (2021-02-17)

New evidence sheds light on treatment for patients with respiratory failure from COVID-19
A study by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) provides new evidence that critically ill patients with COVID-19 who were treated with ECMO had better odds of survival than those who were not treated with ECMO. (2021-02-02)

When rhinos fly: Upside down the right way for transport
When it comes to saving endangered species of a certain size, conservationists often have to think outside the box. (2021-02-01)

Medicaid expansion in New York has improved maternal health, study finds
A new Columbia University study has found that Medicaid expansion in 2014 in New York State was associated with a statistically significant reduction in severe maternal morbidity in low-income women during delivery hospitalizations compared with high-income women. The decrease was even more pronounced in racial and ethnic minority women than in White women. Until now there was little research on the link between ACA Medicaid expansion and maternal health outcomes. (2021-01-29)

Imaging the twilight zone
What happens in the brain when our conscious awareness fades during general anesthesia and normal sleep? Finnish scientists studied this question with novel experimental designs and func-tional brain imaging. They succeeded in separating the specific changes related to consciousness from the more widespread overall effects, and discovered that the effects of anesthesia and sleep on brain activity were surprisingly similar. These novel findings point to a common central core brain network fundamental for human consciousness. (2020-12-29)

The brain network driving changes in consciousness
The loss and return of consciousness is linked to the same network of brain regions for both sleep and anesthesia, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-12-28)

Study reveals networks of genes involved in congenital heart disease
A group researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco led by Benoit Bruneau have made inroads into understanding what genes are improperly deployed in some cases of congenital heart disease. Their study, published in Developmental Cell, could point toward new ways to prevent or treat one of the most common birth defects. (2020-12-14)

Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) coil from GE shows promise for whole-brain imaging
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a prototype 16-channel head Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) radiofrequency coil from GE Healthcare outperformed a conventional 8-channel head coil for in vivo whole-brain imaging, though it did not perform as well as a conventional 32-channel head coil. (2020-12-03)

Spinal/epidural anesthesia associated with increased survival in leg artery bypass surgery
A new study published in The BMJ shows that people who had surgery to improve blood flow in their legs under spinal or epidural anesthesia were less likely to die than those who were given general anesthesia. (2020-11-25)

Simultaneous kidney transplant plus weight loss surgery safe for obese patients
A new study shows that robotic-assisted kidney transplant and weight loss surgery can be performed safely. (2020-11-10)

Nasal septum surgery can affect behaviour, say medics from RUDN University
A team of medics from RUDN University conducted an experiment on rats and confirmed that surgeries in the nasal cavity can cause behavioral changes, namely, make the animals timider. This effect is associated with an ANS reaction triggered by stress. (2020-10-22)

Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. (2020-10-15)

Nearly 1 in 8 patients receive unexpected out-of-network bills after colonoscopy
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received potential 'surprise' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. These findings are concerning, as federal regulations eliminate consumer cost-sharing when screening colonoscopies are performed in-network. A brief research report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-10-12)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate, researchers compared exposure to general anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during elective surgery, looking for potential links to the development of dementia. (2020-10-07)

Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science discovered that cortical neuronal intracellular concentrations of ATP, the major cellular energy metabolite, greatly decreased during REM sleep, despite a simultaneous increase in cerebral hemodynamics for energy supply, compared with waking in mice. These indicate that cerebral energy metabolism may not always meet neuronal energy demands. (2020-10-07)

Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects
A team of Salk Institute scientists led by Professor John Reynolds has uncovered details of the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of objects. They found that patterns of neural signals, called traveling brain waves, exist in the visual system of the awake brain and are organized to allow the brain to perceive objects that are faint or otherwise difficult to see. The findings were published in Nature on October 7, 2020. (2020-10-07)

Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-05)

AI predicts patients at highest risk for severe pain, increased opioid use post-surgery
Artificial intelligence (AI) used in machine learning models can predict which patients are at highest risk for severe pain after surgery, and help determine who would most benefit from personalized pain management plans that use non-opioid alternatives, suggests new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-04)

COVID-19 testing of children before anesthesia saves PPE
Universal COVID-19 testing of children who are having procedures requiring anesthesia promotes efficient use of personal protective equipment (PPE), according to research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts. (2020-10-01)

Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. (2020-09-02)

Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep
Dream or REM sleep is distinguished by rapid eye movement and absence of muscle tone, but electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are indistinguishable from those of an awake brain. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have now found an EEG signature of REM sleep, allowing scientists for the first time to distinguish dreaming from wakefulness through brain activity alone. This could help in determining the prognosis for coma patients, and allow study of the impact of anesthesia on dreaming. (2020-08-06)

Post-surgical bleeding associated with more deaths when compared to blood clots after surgery
Post-surgical bleeding is associated with more deaths than blood clots from surgery, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia. (2020-07-21)

Back to the operating room: Orthopedic surgeons issue guidelines on resuming elective surgery amid COVID-19 pandemic
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, thousands of Americans have had to delay recommended but elective orthopedic surgical procedures, such as joint replacement surgery or knee arthroscopy. Now an expert panel has issued recommendations to guide safe resumption of elective orthopedic surgery. The guidelines appear in the July 15, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-07-15)

Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. Findings were published in the peer-reviewed journal Laryngoscope. (2020-07-09)

Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may cut greenhouse gas emissions
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course of a year, and reported in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. (2020-06-16)

Anesthesia's effect on consciousness solved, settling century-old scientific debate
How does general anesthesia cause loss of consciousness? Despite its 175-year-history of use by the U.S. medical system, science has been unable to definitively answer that question, until now. The lipid-based answer could open other brain mysteries. (2020-05-29)

Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-05-28)

How do we disconnect from the environment during sleep and under anesthesia?
A series of new studies by researchers at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience finds, among other important discoveries, that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter secreted in response to stress, lies at the heart of our ability to ''shut off'' our sensory responses and sleep soundly. (2020-05-27)

Noninvasive brain stimulation with ultrasonic waves controls monkeys' choices
Noninvasive pulses of ultrasound waves aimed at specific regions in the brains of macaque monkeys can give some control over the monkeys' choices, scientists report. These findings indicate that ultrasonic brain stimulation could provide a noninvasive, drug-free avenue to study and potentially treat decision-making disorders such as addiction. (2020-05-20)

Scientists find brain center that 'profoundly' shuts down pain
A Duke University research team has found a small area of the brain in mice that can profoundly control the animals' sense of pain. Somewhat unexpectedly, this brain center turns pain off, not on. It's located in an area where few people would have thought to look for an anti-pain center, the amygdala, which is often considered the home of negative emotions and responses, like the fight or flight response and general anxiety. (2020-05-18)

Infecting the mind: Burnout in health care workers during COVID-19
Doctors and nurses across the country are experiencing occupational burnout and fatigue from the increased stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of researchers and medical professionals at Texas A&M University and Houston Methodist Hospital are working together to fight two afflictions: COVID-19 and the mental strain experienced by medical professionals. (2020-05-13)

Stroke doctors establish best practices to protect against COVID-19
To keep patients and health-care providers safe from COVID-19, while providing urgent treatment to stroke patients, extra precautions must be taken, according to new guidelines published in the journal Stroke. (2020-05-07)

Canadian chiropractors remove vaccination info on websites after media coverage
The research team conducted a prospective cohort study focused on Canadian chiropractors' websites between July 2016 and April 2019. Researchers revisited all identified websites from 2016 in April 2019 to explore changes to posted vaccination material. (2020-05-05)

Scientists unveil how general anesthesia works
The discovery of general anesthetics -- compounds which induce unconsciousness, prevent control of movement and block pain -- helped transform dangerous operations into safe surgery. But scientists still don't understand exactly how general anesthetics work. Now, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and Nagoya University have revealed how a general anesthetic called isoflurane weakens the transmission of electrical signals between neurons, at junctions called synapses. (2020-04-27)

Rates of pulmonary complications drastically reduced with newer drug
A team of researchers at Michigan Medicine found the drug sugammadex was associated with significantly reduced rates of pulmonary complications following surgery. (2020-04-08)

Clinical trial to assess potential treatment for COVID-19-related respiratory failure
A team of physician-scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are now enrolling patients in a clinical trial to evaluate a common anti-clotting drug for the treatment of COVID-19-positive patients with ARDS. The newly launched trial follows a special report the team published in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery that suggested the use of a drug called tPA could reduce deaths among patients with ARDS as a complication of COVID-19. (2020-04-06)

Coronavirus-infected patients needing emergency surgery: Anesthesia standards
Physicians describe the standardized procedure of surgical anesthesia for patients with COVID-19 infection requiring emergency surgery to minimize the risk of virus spread and reduce lung injury in a Letter to the Editor published in Surgical Infections, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers. (2020-03-16)

Surgery with anesthesia not linked to indicator of Alzheimer's, Mayo study finds
Older adults who have surgery with general anesthesia may experience a modest acceleration of cognitive decline, even years later. But there's no evidence of a link to Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from Mayo Clinic. (2020-03-12)

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