Current Anger News and Events

Current Anger News and Events, Anger News Articles.
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Artificial emotional intelligence: a safer, smarter future with 5G and emotion recognition
The combination of new 5G communication technologies with AI-based systems are ushering in a ''smart generation'' of vehicles, drones, and even entire cities. Now, researchers take things one step further by introducing a 5G-assisted emotion detection system that uses wireless signals and body movement. In their latest publication, they outline its working principle, application prospects, and potential security threats, highlighting the need for a robust, impregnable AI algorithm to drive it. (2021-02-11)

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that existing drugs commonly used for other disorders might be modified to help treat individual symptoms of multiple disorders. (2021-01-28)

'Honey, I'm home:' Pandemic life for married couples can lead to sadness, anger
West Virginia University researchers led a study examining 165 married individuals and how their partners interfered with their daily routines in April 2020, a month into the pandemic. (2021-01-28)

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults. (2021-01-25)

Covering faces around kids won't mask emotions
The proliferation of face coverings to keep COVID-19 in check isn't keeping kids from understanding facial expressions, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists. (2020-12-23)

The power of validation in helping people stay positive
Telling a distressed friend or family member something as simple as ''I understand why you feel that way'' can go a long way toward helping loved ones feel better, new research suggests. (2020-12-14)

Hip-hop is helping tackle stigma around mental health, say Cambridge researchers
An article published today in BMJ Opinion explores the relationship between hip-hop and mental health, revealing how the genre has helped shine on light on the issues surrounding mental health. Drs Akeem Sule and Becky Inkster from the University of Cambridge - collectively known as Hip Hop Psych - argue that not only has hip-hop helped artists speak candidly, but it may also have helped people worldwide to acknowledge their own inner struggles. (2020-12-09)

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence. (2020-12-03)

Nine years on, the psychological effects of the Syrian war on school children in Damascus
Almost a decade of civil and military unrest has left Syrian children mentally scarred, angry and traumatised, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
Researchers from Bar-Ilan University analyzed self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others. The results showed that a combination of constructive alone and social experiences best contributes to the formation of an integrated self. (2020-11-19)

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem. (2020-11-16)

Cynical hostility presents a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease
Cynical hostility is a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease by preventing a healthy response to stress over time, according to a Baylor University study. (2020-11-16)

Soldiers benefit from psychological health research
Army scientists developed computer-based training to help Soldiers avoid unnecessary social conflict and mitigate anger-related outcomes. (2020-11-09)

Individuals may legitimize hacking when angry with system or authority
University of Kent research has found that when individuals feel that a system or authority is unresponsive to their demands, they are more likely to legitimise hacker activity at an organisation's expense. (2020-10-22)

Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations - which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger - may be because they are 'rehearsing' strategies to cope with hot-headed friends. (2020-10-06)

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2020-10-05)

Cognitive flexibility training manages responses to social conflict
Scientists at the WRAIR and ARL developed a computer-based training to reduce anger, reactive aggression and hostile attribution bias--the tendency to attribute hostile intent to the actions of others--in ambiguous social conflict situations. HAB and unwarranted anger can jeopardize social bonds, team culture and team performance. It is also linked to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and other behavioral health concerns. Researchers showed the HBMT was effective up to 96 hours after the training. (2020-09-30)

Friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced COVID-19 prejudice
A new study finds that friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced Covid-19 prejudice as the virus hit the UK back in February. At the time, opinion polls suggested that one in three Brits already saw the virus as a personal threat and the British press were reporting a rise in hate crimes towards Chinese people. Researchers studied how UK residents felt towards the Chinese community as the pandemic reached our shores, and how these feelings might relate to British support for anti-Chinese policies. (2020-09-27)

Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions. This was the result of a detailed survey of 4,598 participants from 30 nations over six continents, carried out by an international research team. (2020-09-10)

Study finds that sleep restriction amplifies anger
Feeling angry these days? New research suggests that a good night of sleep may be just what you need. (2020-08-28)

Analysis of ancient Mesoamerican sculptures supports universality of emotional expressions
An analysis of facial expressions in ancient Mesoamerican sculptures finds that some emotions expressed in these artworks match the emotions that modern US participants would anticipate for each discernible context, including elation, sadness, pain, anger, and determination or strain. For instance, elation was predicted in the context of social touch while anger was (2020-08-19)

Genetics: Romantic relationship dynamics may be in our genes
Variations in a gene called CD38, which is involved in attachment behaviour in non-human animals, may be associated with human romantic relationship dynamics in daily life, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-18)

Stress and anger may exacerbate heart failure
Mental stress and anger may have clinical implications for patients with heart failure according to a new report published in the Journal of Cardiac Failure. (2020-08-12)

Jealous feelings can act as a tool to strengthen friendships
Jealousy can be important for maintaining friendships, which are crucial to physical and emotional health. A study conducted by scientists at Arizona State University, Oklahoma State University, and Hamilton College found feelings of jealousy were sensitive to the value of the friendship and motivated behaviors aimed at keeping friends. (2020-08-11)

Perspectives on oncology-specific language during COVID-19 pandemic
A practical communication guide designed for oncologists to assuage the fear, anger and anxiety among patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic is proposed in this qualitative study. (2020-08-06)

Study: COVID-19 pandemic has negatively influenced subjective well-being
The COVID-19 pandemic has also affected many people's subjective well-being. This is the result of a long-term study involving 979 people from Germany conducted by psychologists from Leipzig University and Saint Louis University. It found that in the early stage of the pandemic average life satisfaction and the experience of positive feelings decreased significantly. The findings have now been published in ''American Psychologist'' (2020-07-28)

Mindfulness training helps men manage anger
Before treatment, 85% of the men in the study beat, kicked or shook their girlfriend. After treatment, most of them had stopped being violent. (2020-07-21)

Publicizing police killings of unarmed black people causes emotional trauma, says Rutgers study
Rutgers study finds majority of college students of color show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after watching social media videos of unarmed Black men being killed by police (2020-07-16)

Global sentiments towards COVID-19 shifts from fear to anger
The fear that people developed at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak has given way to anger over the course of the pandemic, a study of global sentiments led by NTU Singapore has found. Xenophobia, a common theme among anger-related tweets, evolved to reflect feelings arising from isolation and social seclusion. Accompanying this later shift is the emergence of tweets that show joy, which suggest a sense of gratitude and hope. (2020-07-15)

Future teachers more likely to view black children as angry, even when they are not
A new study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to interpret the facial expressions of Black boys and girls as being angry, even when the children are not angry. This is significantly different than how the prospective teachers interpreted the facial expressions of white children. (2020-07-06)

Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-07-02)

From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences have compared the ability of children and adults to make a spontaneous link between a heard voice and the corresponding emotional expression on a natural or virtual. (2020-06-30)

For children with cleft lip and palate, no major psychological impact of repeated surgeries
Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence. By the time they are teens, patients with CLP with more total surgeries do not have increased psychosocial problems. (2020-06-25)

Temperament affects children's eating habits
Temperamental children are at greater risk for developing unhealthy eating habits. (2020-06-04)

Just read my face, baby
Are you good at reading your partner's emotions? Your perceptiveness may very well strengthen your relationship. Yet when anger or contempt enter the fray, little is to be gained and the quality of your relationship tanks, researchers found. (2020-05-20)

'Loss of pleasure' in teen sleep study
Sleep patterns around the world have been disrupted as screen time increases and sleep routines change with COVID-19 self-isolation requirements. Negative mood is not unusual in adolescence, but lack of sleep can affect mental health, causing anhedonia (or loss of pleasure), anxiety, anger and significantly increasing the risk of depression, a global study of more than 350,000 teens shows. (2020-05-04)

Trust in humans and robots: Economically similar but emotionally different
In research published in the Journal of Economic Psychology, scientists explore whether people trust robots as they do fellow humans. These interactions are important to understand because trust-based interactions with robots are increasingly common in the marketplace, workplace, on the road and in the home. Results show people extend trust similarly to humans and robots but people's emotional reactions in trust-based interactions vary depending on partner type. (2020-04-16)

Do ER caregivers' on-the-job emotions affect patient care?
Doctors and nurses in emergency departments at four academic centers and four community hospitals in the Northeast reported a wide range of emotions triggered by patients, hospital resources and societal factors, according to a qualitative study led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst social psychologist. (2020-03-28)

In politics and pandemics, trolls use fear, anger to drive clicks
A new CU Boulder study shows that Facebook ads developed and shared by Russian trolls around the 2016 election were clicked on nine times more than typical social media ads. The authors say the trolls are likely at it again, as the 2020 election approaches and the COVID-19 pandemic wears on. (2020-03-26)

Where you live may influence your baby's behavior
Infants from rural families tend to display negative emotions such as anger and frustration more frequently than their urban counterparts, according to a recent study in the Journal of Community Psychology. Babies born in big cities, on the other hand, typically are less fussy and not as bothered by limits set by their caregivers. (2020-03-18)

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