Current Angiogenesis News and Events

Current Angiogenesis News and Events, Angiogenesis News Articles.
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New therapeutic approach may help treat age-related macular degeneration effectively
Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) has been linked to retinal neovascularization and the development of abnormal blood vessels, which result in vision loss in diabetic retinopathy. Now, scientists have found that RUNX1 inhibition presents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. Their results are reported in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-22)

Regular walnut consumption may reduce negative outcomes of H. pylori infection
A new animal study, published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, suggests regular walnut consumption may be a promising intervention for reducing negative outcomes associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, a widespread bacterial infection that affects more than half of the world's population. (2021-02-09)

Drug is promising against pancreatic and breast cancers
The drug is effective at treating pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. A second study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows the drug is also effective against triple-negative breast cancer, a fast-growing and hard-to-treat type of breast cancer that carries a poor prognosis. Clinical trials are set to begin in 2021. (2021-02-09)

Hypoxia, a feature inside solid cancer tumors, reprograms methylation of ribosomal RNAs
Hypoxia -- where a tissue is deprived of an adequate supply of oxygen -- is a feature inside solid cancer tumors that renders them highly invasive and resistant to treatment. Researchers now report that chronic hypoxia, surprisingly, upregulates RNA polymerase I activity and alters the methylation patterns on ribosomal RNAs. These altered epigenetic marks on the ribosomal RNAs appear to create a pool of specialized ribosomes that can differentially regulate translation of messenger RNA. (2021-02-03)

New insights into wound healing process
Biomedical engineers developed a technique to observe wound healing in real time, discovering a central role for cells known as fibroblasts. The work, reported in APL Bioengineering, is the first demonstration of a wound closure model within human vascularized tissue in a petri dish. (2021-01-19)

Hinder handing the message -- stopping tumors from creating new blood vessels
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that vasohibin-1 (VASH1), a protein known to prevent the formation of new blood vessels, acts by changing the conditions of microtubules which bring blocking the certain signal from outside through encumbering transport of its message to the inner of cell. The unique function of this protein can inhibit tumor cells from spreading throughout the body, making it a notable finding for cancer therapeutic research. (2020-12-14)

A new way to make arteries
In the study, published in Nature, the authors propose that selective blockade of cell proliferation and metabolism could be used to enhance arterialization in patients with cardiovascular disease. (2020-12-09)

Antiangiogenic therapy can cause malignancy in kidney cancers
In some cases, this type of therapy increases the invasiveness and metastasis of kidney tumors. The study led by IDIBELL and the ICO identifies a biomarker that could predict the malignant response of patients to therapy. (2020-11-05)

Down Syndrome-associated gene suppresses age-related corneal clouding
Down syndrome and hypercholesterolemia mouse models suggest that the DSCR-1 gene protects against abnormal cornea vascularization and associated blindness by suppressing oxidized LDL cholesterol production and downstream angiogenic signaling during chronic high cholesterol. While the neurological pathology of Down syndrome patients worsens with age, they are less susceptible to age-related vascular diseases. The responsible genes and mechanisms are not yet clear, but DSCR-1 is a strong candidate for a wide range of vascular diseases. (2020-11-05)

Age is a primary determinant of melanoma treatment resistance, two studies find
Age may cause identical cancer cells with the same mutations to behave differently. In animal and laboratory models of melanoma cells, age was a primary factor in treatment response. (2020-11-02)

Response to adjuvant bevacizumab among patients with resected melanoma may vary by age
Younger patients with resected melanoma had some benefit from adjuvant treatment with the anti-VEGF therapeutic bevacizumab (Avastin) while older patients with resected melanoma did not. (2020-10-23)

Oncotarget: Sirolimus-eluting stents -- opposite in vitro effects on the clonogenic cell potential
The cover for issue 31 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Concentration dose-response curves of sirolimus effect [55 nM-1 nM] on the number of cells per surviving colony in U2OS cell line after 2 weeks exposure,'' by Vasuri, et al. which reported that the authors evaluated the long-term effects of sirolimus on three different cell in vitro models, cultured in physiological conditions mimicking sirolimus-eluted stent, in order to clarify the effectiveness of sirolimus in blocking cell proliferation and survival. (2020-10-21)

New insight into neovessel formation shows promise in future treatment of cardiovascular diseases
A new study by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland provides novel insight into the previously unknown effects of factors regulating blood vessel formation. In the study, bone morphogenetic factor 6, i.e. BMP6, was shown - for the first time - to regulate blood vessel formation via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and Hippo signalling pathway. The findings can be used in developing treatments for cardiovascular diseases. (2020-10-14)

New treatment targets found for blinding retinal disease
When the eye isn't getting enough oxygen in the face of common conditions like premature birth or diabetes, it sets in motion a state of frenzied energy production that can ultimately result in blindness, and now scientists have identified new points where they may be able to calm the frenzy and instead enable recovery. (2020-08-10)

Lesion of doom -- how a parasitic bacterium induces blood vessel formation to cause lesions
A research team from Fujita Health University, Japan, has found that bacteria of the genus Bartonella release a protein--which they have named BafA--that stimulates the production of new blood vessels that support bacterial lesions. This discovery may help scientists develop new methods for diagnosing and treating these infections. (2020-07-16)

St18 is a negative regulator of VEGF
A research team led by Kenta Maruyama M.D., Ph.D. from National Institute for Physiological Sciences explored the role of St18 in the regulation of VEGF expression. Mice lacking St18 in myeloid lineages are highly susceptible to septic shock. These mice also exhibit increased retinal vasculature with enhanced serum VEGF concentrations, and pharmacological inhibition of VEGF signaling rescues the high mortality rate of septic shock. These findings suggest that St18 is a negative regulator of VEGF. (2020-07-14)

Oncotarget: miR-151a enhances Slug dependent angiogenesis
Volume 11, Issue 23 of @Oncotarget reported that the authors have previously established that mi R-151a functions as an onco-mi R in non-small cell lung cancer cells by inducing partial EMT and enhancing tumor growth. (2020-06-10)

Lungs of deceased COVID-19 patients show distinctive features
In a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), senior author, Steven J. Mentzer, MD, thoracic surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and a team of international researchers examined seven lungs obtained during autopsy from patients who died of COVID-19. (2020-05-21)

Preventing metastasis -- An antibody with therapeutic potential
A receptor in the cell layer that lines the blood vessels from the inside stimulates both the formation of new blood vessels in tumors and metastasis. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg (DKFZ) and the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg have succeeded in blocking this receptor with an antibody to thus prevent the growth of metastases in mice with breast or lung cancer. (2020-04-23)

Lymphoma's different route revealed
Researchers at the MDC observe the very early stages of blood vessel development in lymph node tumors. The findings published in Cancer Research suggest a potential treatment target to slow lymphoma tumor growth. (2020-04-07)

NIH researchers successfully stop blood vessel, tumor growth in mice
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have devised a new strategy to stop tumors from developing the new blood vessels they need to grow. Once thought to be extremely promising for the treatment of cancer, blocking molecules that stimulate new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) has proven ineffective because tumor cells respond by producing more stimulatory molecules. (2020-03-11)

Studies of membrane vesicles pave the way to innovative treatments of degenerative diseases
Membrane vesicles can become a new therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine and a new class of effective and safe medications. (2020-01-15)

The targeted LHRH analog AEZS-108 alters expression of genes related to angiogenesis and development
In the present study, the research team investigated AEZS-108 induced cytotoxicity and the altered mRNA expression profile of regulatory factors related to angiogenesis and metastasis in LHRH receptor-positive OCM3 cells. (2020-01-14)

No need to draw blood -- smart photonic contact lens for diabetic diagnosis and retinopathy treatment
Sei Kwang Hahn and his research team from POSTECH developed a smart LED contact lens. They are preparing for commercialization of wearable medical devices with PHI Biomed Company and Stanford University. (2020-01-10)

Identification of signature genes associated with therapeutic resistance to anti-VEGF therapy
To establish a molecular signature of this resistance in ovarian cancer, the authors developed preclinical tumor models of adaptive resistance to chronic anti-VEGF treatment. (2020-01-08)

Novel genetic signature that can predict some kinds of breast cancer is identified
The research, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, combined a study of the genes involved in retinopathy, as a model of angiogenesis, with analysis of transcriptomic gene expression profiles from public breast cancer databases. (2019-12-17)

Recruitment of miR-8080 by luteolin inhibits AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer
Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have a poor clinical response to drugs for CRPC, including enzalutamide. Recently, an mRNA splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR), called AR-V7, that lacks a functional ligand-binding domain has been highlighted as a major resistance mechanism in CRPC. This important study describes a novel mechanism for down-regulation of AR-V7 by miR-8080, which suppresses the tumor growth and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of enzalutamide in CRPC. (2019-12-05)

Carbon dots make calcium easier to track
Prof. DONG Wenfei's research group from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) has developed a new type of fluorescent carbon dot that can effectively detect calcium levels in cells. (2019-11-12)

Another trick up the immune system's sleeve: Regrowing blood vessels
Peripheral artery disease, which affects 8.5 million people in the US, can cut off blood flow to the arms and legs, sometimes forcing doctors to amputate limbs. A new approach from the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS uses a biomaterial scaffold to recruit the body's own immune T cells to help regrow blood vessels in mice with hindlimb ischemia, supporting immune engineering as a possible treatment for vascular diseases. (2019-07-31)

Discovery shows how difficult-to-treat prostate cancer evades immune system
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered how an aggressive form of prostate cancer called double-negative prostate cancer (DNPC) metastasizes by evading the the immune system. The investigators also reported on the pre-clinical development of a new therapy, which, when given in combination with existing immunotherapies, appears to stop and even reverse metastasis in mouse models. (2019-07-18)

A study demonstrates that p38 protein regulates the formation of new blood vessels
Ángel R. Nebreda's team (IRB Barcelona) publishes a study in the journal Nature Communications addressing the role of the p38 protein in angiogenesis--the formation of new blood vessels--a critical process that fuels tumour cells and allows them to grow and eventually develop metastases. A greater understanding of how new blood vessel formation is regulated could help to improve chemotherapy treatments for cancer, as well as to develop more efficient angiogenic therapies for other diseases. (2019-07-17)

Researchers at IDIBELL-ICO describe a new resistance mechanism
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the ProCure Program of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) published today at Cancer Research a study describing a new mechanism in cancer that turns cells into malignant cells and contradicts what had been published so far about drug resistance that prevent the formation of blood vessels (anti-angiogenics). The research has been led by Dr. Oriol Casanovas, from the group of Tumor Angiogenesis of the IDIBELL (2019-07-02)

Yale study identifies how cancer drug inhibits DNA repair in cancer cells
According to researchers at Yale Cancer Center, a cancer drug thought to be of limited use possesses a superpower of sorts: It is able to stop certain cancer cells from repairing their DNA in order to survive. The study, published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine, suggests that combining this drug, cediranib, with other agents could potentially deliver a lethal blow in cancer that uses a specific pathway -- or process -- to create DNA repair cells. (2019-05-15)

A newly identified mechanism can be targeted to boost angiogenesis
Scientists of the National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) have discovered a cellular and molecular mechanism that can be exploited to induce productive and sustained angiogenesis in tissues that have become ischemic due to reduced blood supply. (2019-05-01)

Creating blood vessels on demand
Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes. (2019-04-03)

Blood runs deep: Lab blood vessel model sheds light on angiogenesis
Researchers at the University of Tokyo and at CNRS in France revealed the importance of the molecule EGFL7 for angiogenesis and endothelial integrity using an artificially created blood vessel model called a microvessel-on-a-chip. They showed that EGFL7 knockdown in the endothelial cells forming this model resulted in reduced angiogenesis and impaired barrier function. This work suggested the value of targeting EGFL7 and of using the microvessel-on-a-chip in the pursuit of treatments for diseases like cancer and diabetic retinopathy. (2019-01-31)

Study reveals how brain tumors escape the effects of antiangiogenic drugs
A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Cyprus reveals details of a way the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas resist the effects of antiangiogenic drugs designed to cut off their blood supply, identifying what may be a new treatment target. (2019-01-30)

New therapeutic avenue in the fight against chronic liver disease
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. (2019-01-18)

A new way to cut the power of tumors
Instead of tackling tumors head-on, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc chose to regulate their vascularization by intervening with cellular receptor overexpressed specifically in cancer blood vessels. By acting on the development of the blood vessels within the tumor, scientists hope to modulate vasculature and deliver the treatments extremely accurately, and even if necessary 'cut the food' to the tumor, much like you'd close a tap. (2018-12-20)

Promising research shows blood vessel growth key to healthy fat tissue
research led by York University's Faculty of Health shows that inhibiting a protein within blood vessels stimulates new blood vessel growth, resulting in healthier fat tissue (adipose) and lower blood sugar levels. The findings provide key insight into how improving blood vessel growth could help to mitigate serious health problems that arise with obesity, such as diabetes. (2018-12-04)

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