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Answer quickly to be believed
When people pause before replying to a question, even for just a few seconds, their answers are perceived to be less sincere and credible than if they had replied immediately, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-02-16)

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk. By analysing over thirty thousand recipes, we show that average number of spices per recipe is more strongly associated with socioeconomic factors than infectious disease. (2021-02-04)

Researchers use AI to help businesses understand Code of Federal Regs, other legal docs
Automated Legal Document Analytics (ALDA) provides tools for people, businesses, and other entities to understand highly complex, legally binding documents. Using AI, a UMBC team has now broken down the Code of Federal Regulations into components that are semantically linked for automated analysis. This means that any user can 'ask' the system whether something is allowable under the code, increasing their understanding of it and their access to opportunities that require CFR compliance. (2021-01-29)

To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new paper in Physical Review Letters offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models. (2021-01-25)

NIH officials highlight COVID-19 vaccine facts, unknowns for healthcare providers
Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-18)

Study suggests great earthquakes as cause of Arctic warming
A researcher from MIPT has proposed a new explanation for the Arctic's rapid warming. In his recent paper in Geosciences, he suggests that the warming could have been triggered by a series of great earthquakes (2020-12-23)

Creating a ground plan for stonefly evolution
A team led by the University of Tsukuba microscopically examined the eggs of stoneflies to identify ground plan features and shed light on the evolutionary history of the order. By identifying ancestral and derived features, the researchers reconstructed the evolution of egg structures, and confirmed that establishing an embryonic ground plan can provide unique insights into the evolution of the group. (2020-12-15)

Observing the ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons
Photo-induced electron transfer is central to numerous physical processes, for instance in the magnetization of materials. The quest to understand and control this ultrafast process has long been pursued in vain, with no answer to the question of whether electrons induce atomic motion, or vice versa. To answer this question, the atomic equivalent of the paradox of the chicken and the egg, a consortium of scientists used an X-ray laser (X-FEL) located in Stanford. (2020-12-07)

For COVID-19 surveillance, test frequency and turnaround time are paramount, modeling suggests
Speed of test results and frequency of testing are paramount for effective COVID-19 surveillance, suggests a new study that modeled trade-offs in test sensitivity, test frequency, and sample-to-answer reporting time, in select scenarios. Test sensitivity is secondary to these factors in the scenarios studied. (2020-11-20)

Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance. (2020-09-17)

Waiting for Godot Metaphor
Author suggests a gradated Pandemic Index as an initial effort. (2020-08-28)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

Viruses beware: scientists show how bacterial 'attack dog' toxin disrupts protein synthesis
A team of Skoltech researchers from the Severinov laboratory and their colleagues have identified the way in which a component of a two-part bacterial self-defense system from the toxin-antitoxin family works, leading to cell dormancy that helps fight off bacterial viruses, antibiotics and other insults. (2020-07-06)

A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)

UMN trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19
Today, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19. (2020-06-03)

If used with caution, SARS-CoV-2 serological assays can guide reintroduction of workforce
With several high-quality serological assays for SARS-CoV-2 now available, the key challenge in using them to help people return to 'normal life,' write Florian Krammer and Viviana Simon in this Perspective, will be to apply them in a strategic manner -- one that considers their unique sensitivity and specificity levels, acknowledges the questions they don't yet answer, and more. (2020-05-15)

AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
Researchers have developed an AI algorithm that can detect and identify different types of brain injuries. (2020-05-14)

Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions -- liberalism and realism -- dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Arman Grigoryan, a faculty member in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University has contributed to this debate with a recent article in a top journal, International Security. (2020-05-12)

Horror movies manipulate brain activity expertly to enhance excitement
Finnish research team maps neural activity in response to watching horror movies. A study conducted by the University of Turku shows the top horror movies of the past 100 years, and how they manipulate brain activity. (2020-01-24)

Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such as targeted therapies. (2019-12-06)

Scientists develop method to standardize genetic data analysis
MIPT researchers have collaborated with Atlas Biomedical Holding and developed a new bioinformatics data analysis method. The developed program, EphaGen, can be used for quality control when diagnosing genetic diseases. (2019-11-08)

Learning is optimized when we fail 15% of the time
If you're always scoring 100%, you're probably not learning anything new. Research led by the University of Arizona found that the 'sweet spot' for learning is 85%. (2019-11-05)

By cutting out one gene, researchers remove a tadpole's ability to regenerate
Tadpoles that can typically regrow amputated tails or limbs lost their ability to regenerate after researchers blocked the expression of a newly identified gene that is one of the drivers for this regrowth. Furthermore, scientists hypothesize that the loss of appendage regeneration in warm-blooded animals might have been caused by the gain or loss of this gene, dubbed c-Answer, in an ancestor's genome during evolution. The work appears Oct. 22 in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-10-22)

Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. University of Queensland physicist Dr Magdalena Zych said the international collaboration aimed to test Einstein's twin paradox using quantum particles in a 'superposition' state. (2019-10-15)

Diversity may be key to reducing errors in quantum computing
In quantum computing, as in team building, a little diversity can help get the job done better, computer scientists have discovered. (2019-10-15)

Under time pressure, people tell us what we want to hear
When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows. (2019-10-11)

It's all a blur.....why stripes hide moving prey
Scientists at Newcastle University have shown that patterns -- particularly stripes which are easy to spot when an animal is still -- can also help conceal speeding prey. (2019-09-11)

Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved -- using real life planetary computer
Hot on the heels of the ground-breaking 'Sum-Of-Three-Cubes' solution for the number 33, a team led by the University of Bristol and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has solved the final piece of the famous 65-year-old maths puzzle with an answer for the most elusive number of all - 42. (2019-09-06)

JHU study explains how some older brains decline before people realize it
Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why. (2019-08-05)

Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines. (2019-07-25)

Civility still matters to some in cyberspace
In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the ''best answer.'' (2019-06-04)

ASCO: Entrectinib gets edge over crizotinib against ROS1+ lung cancer
Median time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) on crizotinib was 8.8 months; TTD of patients using entrectinib was 14.6 months. Compared with patients on entrectinib, patients on crizotinib had an additional 44 percent chance that their cancer would resume its growth. (2019-05-30)

New substance can form in the OA process of crystal growth, new study reveals
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) under the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of the Chinese Academy of Scienceshave revealed that a new substance can form during the oriented attachment (OA) process of crystal growth, which may shed new light on the microscopic mechanism of crystal growth. (2019-05-29)

What we think we know -- but might not -- pushes us to learn more
Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-05-23)

New research identifies microbes that may reduce allergy-like reactions in many people
A small percentage of humans can suffer allergy-like reactions to certain varieties of ripened cheese due to histamine, a byproduct of the prolonged fermentation process. An ISU researcher is studying bacterial strains that could reduce histamine, allowing susceptible diners to enjoy the cheese without unpleasant side effects. (2019-04-16)

How common are advanced care planning conversations with hospitalized, older patients?
A research team from Dartmouth College analyzed advanced care planning (ACP) billing at a national physician practice and found that despite incentives, the rate of ACP-billed conversations was low and varied greatly among physicians and practice sites. (2019-04-01)

UAlberta leads urgent call for sample rocks from Mars
In order to answer our most pressing questions about Mars, scientists need samples collected from the planet's surface and returned to Earth for examination. (2019-03-28)

Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-26)

Researchers get humans to think like computers
Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school buses. People aren't supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can. (2019-03-22)

Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance, Mason research shows
A new study from the George Mason University Arts Research Center and published in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. The study, led by Adam Winsler, professor of applied developmental psychology, followed a large and diverse sample of preschool children up until they completed sixth, seventh and eighth grade. (2019-03-12)

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