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Strange creatures accidentally discovered beneath Antarctica's ice shelves
Prior research has suggested that the watery depths below the Antarctic ice shelves are too cold and nutrient poor to sustain much life. But a new study from British Antarctic Survey published in Frontiers in Marine Science reveals the discovery of a colony of sponges and other animals attached to a boulder on the sea floor - challenging researchers' understanding about the existence of life in extreme environments. (2021-02-15)

Child brain tumors can be classified by advanced imaging and AI
Diffusion weighted imaging and machine learning can successfully classify the diagnosis and characteristics of common types of paediatric brain tumours a UK-based multi-centre study, including WMG at the University of Warwick has found. This means that the tumour can be characterised and treated more efficiently. (2021-02-15)

How will SARS-CoV-2 severity change in the next decade?
What will the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak look like ten years from now as it passes from pandemic to endemic, maintained at a constant baseline level in populations without being fueled by outside infections? (2021-01-12)

Studying trust in autonomous products
Stanford engineers investigated how people's moods might affect their trust of autonomous products, such as smart speakers. They uncovered a complicated relationship. (2020-12-08)

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continents
Geoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas -- and the exact shapes that land masses formed -- have so far eluded experts. (2020-12-01)

A new species of rare phylum Loricifera discovered in the deep-sea surrounding Japan
The Loricifera is a microscopic, sediment-dwelling marine invertebrate, with a head covered in over 200 spines and an abdomen with a protective shell - known as a lorica. Since it was first discovered in 1983, just under 40 species have been written about. Now, that number is one more thanks to a group of scientists who reported on a new genus and species of Loricifera. (2020-11-24)

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related
The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications. (2020-11-10)

AI teachers must be effective and communicate well to be accepted, new study finds
The increase in online education has allowed a new type of teacher to emerge -- an artificial one. But just how accepting students are of an artificial instructor remains to be seen. That's why researchers at the University of Central Florida are working to examine student perceptions of artificial intelligence-based teachers. Their latest findings were published recently in the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction. (2020-10-30)

Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it - but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests. Researchers found that people perceived they had more support from a group of friends or family who all knew and liked each other than from an identical number of close relationships who were not linked. (2020-10-07)

Expert opinion: COVID-19 vaccine rollout unlikely before fall 2021
Experts working in the field of vaccine development tend to believe that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for the general public before the fall of 2021. In a paper published this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a McGill-led team published the results of a recent survey of 28 experts working in vaccinology. (2020-10-01)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

"Grown-ups don't always get it right, you know"
When 11 year old Oscar told his mum, Dr Emma Maynard that ''grown-ups don't always get it right, you know'' the statement struck a chord with the Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Portsmouth. (2020-08-04)

Kidneys deteriorate with age, regardless of health
Why we age remains an unanswered question. But recently, researchers at UiT, along with colleagues in Berlin and Reykjavik, have discovered that kidneys age, regardless if people are sick or not. (2020-06-09)

Workers happy despite crisis and uncertainty
In general, workers in Switzerland and Germany are coping well with the COVID-19 crisis and the associated social disruption. They are feeling happier and finding it easier to unwind and balance work and private life. They are also more engaged at work than last year, a survey among 600 participants carried out by researchers of the University of Zurich shows. (2020-05-06)

Children don't know how to get proper nutrition information online
Children looking for health information online could end up more prone to obesity. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, shows a lack of digital health literacy can lead children to misinterpret portions, adopt recommendations intended for adults, or take guidance from noncredible sources. (2020-05-06)

Hate speech dominates social media platform when users want answers on terrorism
People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community social media platform, a study has found. (2020-02-20)

What is your risk from smoking? Your network knows!
A new study from researchers at Penn's Annenberg School for Communication found that most people, smokers and non-smokers alike, were nowhere near accurate in their answers to questions about smoking's health effects. But critically, the study found a way to help people be more accurate: discussing their ideas with other people. (2020-02-06)

Is it possible to reduce political polarization?
In the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election, an unusual experiment suggested that it might be possible to influence American voters to adopt less polarized positions. (2020-02-05)

Owners of high-status cars are on a collision course with traffic
Self-centred men who are argumentative, stubborn, disagreeable and unempathetic are much more likely to own a high-status car. (2020-01-29)

Revealed: The explosive origin of superluminous supernova SN 2006gy
Providing answers about its curious supreme brightness, researchers say the superluminous supernova SN 2006gy -- one of the brightest stellar explosions ever studied, and discovered in 2006 -- gained its exceptional luster when a normal Type Ia explosion smashed into a surrounding shell of ejected stellar material. (2020-01-23)

What leads to compulsive alcohol use? New experiments into binge drinking provide answers
New study from neuroscientists at Vanderbilt provides initial answers to long-standing scientific questions on what causes the transition from moderate to compulsive alcohol consumption - and what makes some drinkers particularly vulnerable to developing alcohol use disorders. (2019-11-21)

Quantum computers learn to mark their own work
A new test to check if a quantum computer is giving correct answers to questions beyond the scope of traditional computing could help the first quantum computer that can outperform a classical computer to be realised. (2019-11-18)

Under time pressure, people tell us what we want to hear
When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows. (2019-10-11)

Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way
While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. Now, Penn State researchers have designed a 2D device that can provide more than yes-or-no answers and could be more brainlike than current computing architectures. (2019-09-13)

Disabled people marginalised by paperwork and programmes which aim to help them
Research from Lancaster University Management School (LUMS), published in Organization Studies shows disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them. Projects and welfare systems established to provide support are normalizing disabled people, and unintentionally contributing to their further marginalization. (2019-09-13)

Addressing serious illness with a serious question to clinicians
A question: 'Would you be surprised if this patient died in the next month?' -- posed to elicit a clinician's overall impression of a patient -- produced a strong correlation. If a clinician answered that they would not be surprised, the patient was twice as likely to die in the next month. (2019-09-13)

Financial education programs, income-based repayment plans promote prosperity
Financial education programs and income-based repayment plans help young adults with student loan debt prosper after college, according to a study led by University of Illinois social work professor Min Zhan. (2019-09-05)

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (2019-07-25)

Does genetic testing pose psychosocial risks?
For the last quarter century, researchers have been asking whether genetic information might have negative psychosocial effects. Anxiety, depression, disrupted relationships, and heightened stigmatization have all been posited as possible outcomes--but not consistently found. What accounts for the discrepancy? A new special report published by The Hastings Center explores this question. (2019-07-08)

Neurosciences unlock the secret of the first abstract engravings
Long before Lascaux paintings, humans engraved abstract motifs on stones. The question is whether they are the result of unpurposive behaviour, the simple desire of imitating nature or endowed with meaning. A recent study is providing answers to this question. These prehistoric abstract patterns are processed by the same brain areas that recognize objects. They also activate a region of the left hemisphere that is well known in the processing of written language. (2019-07-03)

Discovery linking microbes to methane emissions could make agriculture more sustainable
Common dairy cows share the same core group of genetically inherited gut microbes, which influence factors such as how much methane the animals release during digestion and how efficiently they produce milk, according to a new study. (2019-07-03)

A further step towards reliable quantum computation
A team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum computation. The new results are of direct relevance for future generations of quantum devices and are published in the current issue of the journal 'Nature Physics'. (2019-06-25)

Making it personal: How genetic technologies are changing the face of medicine
Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and other sites show how personalized medicine can be used to pinpoint the source of infection. A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that genetic testing can lead to higher rates of diagnosis in patients with meningitis and encephalitis. (2019-06-13)

Civility still matters to some in cyberspace
In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the ''best answer.'' (2019-06-04)

What we think we know -- but might not -- pushes us to learn more
Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-05-23)

USC study finds warmer temperatures improve women's performance
A new USC study found that women performed better on math and verbal tasks at higher temperatures, while the opposite was true for men. The study suggests that gender is an important factor not only in determining the impact of temperature on comfort but also on productivity and cognitive performance. (2019-05-22)

What Americans know about science
There are substantial differences among Americans when it comes to knowledge and understanding of science and scientific processes. People's level of science knowledge varies by education, race, ethnicity and gender. (2019-03-28)

In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. The work is detailed in a study, 'Social information and Spontaneous Emergence of Leaders in Human Groups,' published in The Royal Society Interface. The team included Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of biomedical engineering at NYU Tandon and Shinnosuke Nakayama, postdoctoral researcher at NYU Tandon. (2019-02-21)

Specialist-led bereavement service may help curb legal action after hospital deaths
Hospital bereavement services that are led by senior doctors and nurses and the person responsible for quality and safety may help to curb patient complaints and legal action in the wake of a difficult death, suggest the results of a pilot study, carried out at one NHS hospital trust and published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2019-01-21)

Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know
Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leuven made improvements to the model for assessing academic achievements and published their results in the journal Heliyon. (2018-12-27)

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