Current Antarctic Ice Sheet News and Events | Page 25

Current Antarctic Ice Sheet News and Events, Antarctic Ice Sheet News Articles.
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Ceres takes life an ice volcano at a time
In new study by University of Arizona planetary scientists, observations prove that ice volcanoes on the dwarf planet Ceres generate enough material to fill one movie theater each year. (2018-09-17)

Particles surf their own waves, reveal how microbes and cells move through human body
Surf's up for microbes swimming beside red blood cells. New calculations and experiments model for the first time how spherical particles submerged in gooey liquid travel along a flexible rubber sheet; comparable conditions are common in the human body, such as blood cells flowing through a capillary or the journeys of self-propelled microbes. All these particles, it turns out, catch a wave. (2018-09-17)

More ships and more clouds mean cooling in the arctic
UConn professor of geology Scott Stephenson and colleagues recently modeled the future of trans-Arctic shipping routes and found that increased emissions will spell a trend of slowed cooling in the region. Though the researchers stress this is in no way an endorsement to trans-Arctic shipping or a means to mitigate climate change, however the results illustrate the complexities in understanding how human activities impact the climate. (2018-09-17)

NASA-funded ELFIN to study how electrons get lost
The NASA-funded, UCLA built ELFIN Cubesat will launch on Sept 15, piggy-backing with NASA's ICESat-2, to study how electrons are lost from the Van Allen Belts. (2018-09-14)

ORNL-developed technology streamlines computational science projects
An ORNL research team led by Jay Jay Billings has continuously updated a workflow management system they first developed in 2010 to help computational scientists develop software, visualize data, and solve problems, saving time and effort expended in support of modeling and simulation experiments. Recently, the team published an article inSoftwareX that both details the history of the system and previews the potential benefits of upcoming versions. (2018-09-14)

Fluorescence-activating beta-barrel protein made from scratch for first time
For the first time, scientists have created, entirely from scratch, a protein capable of binding to a small target molecule. They designed a cylindrical protein called a beta barrel, which has a cavity to bind the target. The designed protein was able to bind and activate a compound similar to that housed inside green fluorescent protein. (2018-09-12)

Kidnapping in the Antarctic animal world?
Pteropods or sea snails, also called sea angels, produce chemical deterrents to ward off predators, and some species of amphipods take advantage of this by carrying pteropods piggyback to gain protection from their voracious predators. (2018-09-10)

UNM, USF scientists find stable sea levels during last interglacial
The magnitude and trajectory of sea-level change during the Last Interglacial, more specifically Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e, is uncertain. To date the consensus view has been that sea-level may have been six to nine meters above present sea level. However, scientists at The University of New Mexico (UNM) and the University of South Florida (USF) and their international team of collaborators aren't so sure that those sea level fluctuations are accurate. (2018-09-10)

Volcano under ice sheet suggests thickening of West Antarctic ice is short-term
Evidence left by a volcano under the ice sheet suggests that the observed bulging of ice in West Antarctica is a short-term feature that may not affect the glacier's motion over the long term. (2018-09-06)

Ancient farmers spared us from glaciers but profoundly changed Earth's climate
A study published in the journal Scientific Reports provides new evidence that ancient farming practices led to a rise in the atmospheric emission of the heat-trapping gases carbon dioxide and methane -- a rise that has continued since, unlike the trend at any other time in Earth's geologic history. (2018-09-06)

Mud from the deep sea reveals clues about ancient monsoon
The Sonoran Desert is one of the world's most biodiverse deserts, thanks to the annual monsoon, which provide a source of moisture in addition to seasonal winter rains. UA researchers were able to access untapped clues about the monsoon's activity during the last ice age, about 20,000 years ago. Their findings help scientists predict how regional climates may respond to future conditions. (2018-09-03)

Can social media networks reduce political polarization on climate change?
Political bias often leads to polarization on topics like climate change. But a new study from Damon Centola of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication has shown that exposure to anonymous, bipartisan social networks can make a striking difference, leading both liberals and conservatives to improve their forecasting of climate-change trends. (2018-09-03)

Oregon researchers offer new way to see dirty underside of glaciers
Accurate projections of sea level rise require sophisticated models for glacier flow, but current approaches do a poor job capturing the physical processes that control how fast glaciers slide over sediments, according to University of Oregon researchers. In a new study, they've proposed a theoretical approach that sheds light on the dirty, dark undersides of glaciers and improve the modeling of ice flow. (2018-09-03)

A new way to remove ice buildup without power or chemicals
MIT researchers led by Kripa Varanasi found a way to prevent icing of powerlines, airplanes, wind turbines, and other surfaces with a special coating and the power of sunlight -- no heating or harsh chemicals needed. (2018-08-31)

New Zealand penguins make mammoth migrations, traveling thousands of kilometers to feed
Fiordland penguins, Eudyptes pachyrhynchus, known as Tawaki, migrate up to 2,500 km from their breeding site, according to a study publishing Aug. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Thomas Mattern of the University of Otago and colleagues. (2018-08-29)

'Archived' heat has reached deep into the Arctic interior, researchers say
Arctic sea ice isn't just threatened by the melting of ice around its edges, a new study has found: Warmer water that originated hundreds of miles away has penetrated deep into the interior of the Arctic. (2018-08-29)

Travelling thousands of kilometres to feed -- Otago studies penguins' 'crazy' journeys
Imagine making a 7,000km journey just for dinner. That, University of Otago scientists have found, is the life of the elusive Fiordland penguin (2018-08-29)

Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that certain leaf metabolites can be used as markers for mycorrhizal associations. Mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the plants' nutrient uptake and help them thrive under extreme conditions. The discovery of foliar markers enables scientists to screen large amounts of plants for mycorrhizal associations without having to destroy them. This new tool could contribute to breeding more efficient and stress-tolerant crops for sustainable agriculture. (2018-08-28)

Counting on NASA's ICESat-2
NASA is about to launch the agency's most advanced laser instrument of its kind into space. The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, will provide critical observations of how ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice are changing, leading to insights into how those changes impact people where they live. Launch is scheduled for Sept. 15, and as we count down the days, we're counting up 10 things you should know about ICESat-2: (2018-08-28)

Nanotubes change the shape of water
Nanotubes of the right diameter can prompt water inside to solidify into a square tube, transitioning into a kind of ice. The discovery could lead to new types of nanochannels devices, like nanoscale capacitors or syringes. (2018-08-24)

Crystalline silica in meteorite brings scientists closer to understanding solar evolution
Scientists discovered silica mineral quartz in a primitive meteorite, becoming the first in the world to present direct evidence of silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk. They also found ultrarefractory scandium- and zirconium-bearing minerals in the meteorite, which implies that the minerals condensed from nebular gas over a wide temperature range. (2018-08-22)

New Antarctic rift data has implications for volcanic evolution -- Ben-Gurion U.
New marine geophysical data recorded during two excursions on a French icebreaker enabled Drs. Roi Granot and Jérôme Dyment to date the ocean floor and calculate the relative motion between the Antarctic Plates and the Australian Plate. This new data revealed that Antarctica fused into one plate around 11 million years ago, roughly 15 million years later than previously assumed. (2018-08-21)

Enigmatic African fossils rewrite story of when lemurs got to Madagascar
Research reveals that a 20-million-year-old African fossil, long thought to be a bat, actually represents one of the earliest branches of the lemur family tree. The reassessment challenges a long-held view that lemurs descended from ancestors that colonized Madagascar in a single wave roughly 60 million years ago, and were the first mammals to get there. Instead, the researchers say two separate lemur lineages may have arrived independently, and much later than previously thought. (2018-08-21)

Scientists discover first direct evidence of surface exposed water ice on the Moon
A team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the first direct evidence for the surface exposed water ice in permanently shaded regions (PSRs) of the Moon. (2018-08-21)

Techniques for reducing sugar content in dairy products show promise
Dairy foods are popular among consumers, and sales gross more than $125 billion per year (IDFA, 2017). With dairy product popularity comes new demands from consumers for healthier, low-calorie products that taste the same as their higher calorie counterparts. In a report published in the Journal of Dairy Science researchers review the options available to the dairy industry to reduce sugar in products such as ice cream, yogurt, and flavored milk without sacrificing flavor. (2018-08-20)

Researchers succeed in imaging quantum events
An international group led by Professor Beena Kalisky and Professor Aviad Frydman, from the Department of Physics and the Institute for Nanotechnology at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, has succeeded in imaging quantum fluctuations for the first time. In their experiment, published today in Nature Physics, not only were quantum fluctuations visualized, but new information about the sizes, times and distributions of quantum events was extracted. (2018-08-20)

Diving robots find Antarctic seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide in winter
The open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide in winter than previously believed, a new study has found. Researchers conducting the study used data gathered over several winters by an array of robotic floats diving and drifting in the Southern Ocean around the southernmost continent. (2018-08-15)

Glacier depth affects plankton blooms off Greenland
The unusual timing of highly-productive summer plankton blooms off Greenland indicates a connection between increasing amounts of meltwater and nutrients in these coastal waters. In a new study published today in Nature Communications, an international group of researchers shows that this connection exists, but is much more complex than widely supposed. Whether increasing meltwater has a positive or negative effect on summertime phytoplankton depends on the depth at which a glacier sits in the ocean. (2018-08-14)

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide
A new study led by the University of Washington uses data gathered by floating drones in the Southern Ocean over past winters to learn how much carbon dioxide is transferred by the surrounding seas. Results show that in winter the open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide than previously believed. (2018-08-14)

Melt-rate of West Antarctic Ice Sheet highly sensitive to changes in ocean temperatures
Melting of ice shelves in West Antarctica speeds up and slows down in response to changes in deep ocean temperature, and is far more variable than previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. (2018-08-13)

Europe needs coastal adaptation measures to avoid catastrophic flooding by the end of the century
Coastal floods could impact up to 3.65 million people every year in Europe by 2100, according to a study from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. (2018-08-13)

Ice sheets of the last ice age seeded the ocean with silica
New research led by glaciologists and isotope geochemists from the University of Bristol has found that melting ice sheets provide the surrounding oceans with the essential nutrient silica. (2018-08-10)

Scientists uncover new details in how sense of smell develops
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have uncovered new details in how the olfactory epithelium develops. The new knowledge could help scientists prove that turbinates and the resulting larger surface area of the olfactory epithelium are one definitive reason dogs smell so well. (2018-08-09)

Pacific Ocean's effect on Arctic warming
New research, led by former Carnegie postdoctoral fellow Summer Praetorius, shows that changes in the heat flow of the northern Pacific Ocean may have a larger effect on the Arctic climate than previously thought. The findings are published in the Aug. 7, 2018, issue of Nature Communications. (2018-08-07)

Million fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter's moon Ganymede
Chorus waves are electromagnetic waves. Converted to sound they sound like singing and chirping birds at dawn. They can cause polar lights above the Earth as well as damage to satellites. Now, a team of researchers led by Yuri Shprits of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences found that such waves are intensified millionfold around Jupiter's moon Ganymede. This study provides important observational constraints for theoretical studies. (2018-08-07)

Study finds possible connection between US tornado activity, Arctic sea ice
The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report. (2018-08-06)

Earth at risk of heading towards 'hothouse Earth' state
An international team of scientists has published a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showing that even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call 'hothouse Earth' conditions. (2018-08-06)

The fate of Arctic mosquitoes depends on habitat and access to blood meals
The future of Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) in western Greenland depends on aquatic habitat and access to blood meals, according to a Dartmouth study. The study found that female mosquitoes carrying eggs were most abundant near ponds, especially in areas frequented by animals such as caribou, birds and the Arctic hare. Published in Ecosphere, the findings provide new insight into mosquito population dynamics. The rapid rate of environmental changes in the Arctic are impacting aquatic habitats and wildlife that mosquitoes depend on for blood meals. (2018-08-03)

UB researchers discover a disease threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica
A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor. (2018-08-02)

Arctic cyclone limits the time-scale of precise sea-ice prediction in Northern Sea Route?
Climate change has accelerated sea-ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean, leading to new opportunities for summer commercial maritime navigation along the Northern Sea Route. International researchers led by Japan's National Institute of Polar Research demonstrated a new system for forecasting sea-ice thickness in early summer in the East Siberian Sea. The system was accurate up to 3 days ahead, representing high potential for use in operational maritime navigation of the Northern Sea Route. (2018-08-01)

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