Current Antarctica News and Events

Current Antarctica News and Events, Antarctica News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Global ice loss increases at record rate
The rate at which ice is disappearing across the planet is speeding up, according to new research. And the findings also reveal that the Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017 - equivalent to a sheet of ice 100 metres thick covering the whole of the UK. (2021-01-25)

Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
New research led by BirdLife International, the University of East Anglia (UEA) and British Antarctic Survey highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins. (2021-01-20)

Red and green snow algae increase snowmelt in the Antarctic Peninsula
Red and green algae that grow on snow in the Antarctic Peninsula cause significant extra snowmelt on par with melt from dust on snow in the Rocky Mountains, according to a first-of-its-kind scientific research study. This could have serious impacts on regional climate, snow and ice melt, freshwater availability and ecosystems, yet is not accounted for in current global climate models. (2021-01-13)

Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth. (2021-01-13)

The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonised by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear. (2021-01-06)

Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists. Two years of recordings have captured nine types of tonal ultrasonic seal vocalizations that reach to 50 kilohertz. (2020-12-21)

Charles Darwin was right about why insects are losing the ability to fly
Most insects can fly. Yet scores of species have lost that extraordinary ability, particularly on islands. (2020-12-09)

How stable is the Antarctic ice sheet?
As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is accelerating. An international team of scientists led by researchers from Heidelberg University has now examined the dynamics of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet more closely using deep-sea sediments dating back approximately 2.5 million years. Their results indicate that, in a constantly warming climate, the ice masses of East Antarctica could be much less stable than previously thought. (2020-11-27)

Ice sheets on the move: how north and south poles connect
Over the past 40,000 years, ice sheets thousands of kilometres apart have influenced one another through sea level changes, according to research published today in Nature. New modelling of ice sheet changes during the most recent glacial cycle by a McGill-led team demonstrates, for the first time, that during this period, changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were driven by the melting ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. (2020-11-25)

Evidence of the interconnectedness of global climate
The analysis, published in Nature, shows for the first time that changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were caused by the melting of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. The influence was driven by sea-level changes caused by the melting ice in the north during the past 40,000 years. (2020-11-25)

Shift in atmospheric rivers could affect Antarctic sea ice, glaciers
Weather systems responsible for transporting moisture from the tropics to temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica, according to new research published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters. (2020-11-23)

New clues shed light on importance of Earth's ice sheets
Researchers examining subglacial waters both from Antarctica and Greenland found that these waters have higher concentrations of important, life-sustaining elements than previously thought, answering a big unknown for scientists seeking to understand the Earth's geochemical processes. (2020-11-23)

Recent climate extremes have driven unprecedented changes in the deep ocean
New measurements reveal a surprising increase in the amount of dense water sinking near Antarctica, following 50 years of decline. (2020-11-16)

Atmospheric rivers help create massive holes in Antarctic sea ice
Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according to Rutgers co-authored research. (2020-11-11)

Ice loss due to warming leads to warming due to ice loss: a vicious circle
The loss of huge ice masses can contribute to the warming that is causing this loss and further risks. A new study now quantifies this feedback by exploring long-term if-then-scenarios. (2020-10-27)

Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
Some of the largest birds in history, called pelagornithids, arose a few million years after the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and patrolled the oceans with giant wingspans for some 60 million years. A team of paleontologists has found two fossils -- each from individual pelagornithids with wingspans of 20 feet or more -- that show this gigantism arose at least 50 million years ago and lasted at least 10 million years. (2020-10-27)

Ice loss likely to continue in Antarctica
A new international study led by Monash University climate scientists has revealed that ice loss in Antarctica persisted for many centuries after it was initiated and is expected to continue. (2020-10-21)

All-female scientific coalition calls for marine protected area for Antarctica Peninsula
Species on the Antarctic Peninsula are threatened by climate change and human activities including commercial fishing, tourism, and research infrastructure. A coalition of over 280 female scientists are pushing for a Marine Protected Area ahead of a meeting of governments to decide this on October 19. These women are part of an initiative to raise the profile of women in STEMM for better global outcomes. (2020-10-18)

Deep sea coral time machines reveal ancient CO2 burps
The fossilised remains of ancient deep-sea corals may act as time machines providing new insights into the effect the ocean has on rising CO2 levels, according to new research carried out by the Universities of Bristol, St Andrews and Nanjing and published today [16 October 2020] in Science Advances. (2020-10-16)

Coldest Northern Hemisphere temperature, first recorded by UW, officially confirmed
Nearly 30 years after recording a temperature of minus 93.2 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 69.6 Celsius) in Greenland, the measurement has been verified by the World Meteorological Organization as the coldest recorded temperature in the Northern Hemisphere. The measurement was first recorded by a University of Wisconsin-Madison Antarctic Meteorological Research Center Automatic Weather Station in December 1991. (2020-09-25)

Stability check on Antarctica reveals high risk for long-term sea-level rise
The warmer it gets, the faster Antarctica loses ice - and much of it will then be gone forever. That's what a team of researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam University and New York's Columbia University has found out in their new study, published in Nature (cover story), on how much warming the Antarctic Ice Sheet can survive. (2020-09-23)

New model -- Antarctic ice loss expected to affect future climate change
In a new climate modeling study that looked at the impacts of accelerated ice melt from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on future climate, a team of climate scientists reports that future ice-sheet melt is expected to have significant effects on global climate. (2020-09-23)

Model comparison
The major international project ISMIP6 offers new estimates of how much melting ice sheets will contribute to global sea-level rise by 2100. (2020-09-17)

Emissions could add 15 inches to 2100 sea level rise, NASA-led study finds
An international effort that brought together more than 60 ice, ocean and atmosphere scientists from three dozen international institutions has generated new estimates of how much of an impact Earth's melting ice sheets. (2020-09-17)

Antarctica: cracks in the ice
In recent years, the Pine Island Glacier and the Thwaites Glacier on West-Antarctica have been undergoing rapid changes, with potentially major consequences for rising sea levels. However, the processes that underlie these changes and their impact on these ice sheets have not been fully charted. One of these processes has now been described in detail: the emergence and development of damage/cracks in part of the glaciers and how this process reinforces itself. (2020-09-14)

Sea level rise from ice sheets track worst-case climate change scenario
Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica whose melting rates are rapidly increasing have raised the global sea level by 1.8cm since the 1990s, and are matching the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst-case climate warming scenarios. (2020-08-31)

Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
University of Washington scientists report evidence of a hibernation-like state in Lystrosaurus, an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. The fossils are the oldest evidence of a hibernation-like state in a vertebrate, and indicate that torpor -- a general term for hibernation and similar states in which animals temporarily lower their metabolic rate to get through a tough season -- arose in vertebrates even before mammals and dinosaurs evolved. (2020-08-27)

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. (2020-08-27)

Antarctic ice shelves vulnerable to sudden meltwater-driven fracturing, says study
A new study says that many of the ice shelves ringing Antarctica could be vulnerable to quick destruction if rising temperatures drive melt water into the numerous fractures that currently penetrate their surfaces. The shelves help slow interior glaciers' slide toward the ocean, so if they were to fail, sea levels around the world could surge rapidly as a result. (2020-08-26)

Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay. (2020-08-24)

Ancient gene family protects algae from salt and cold in an Antarctic lake
Two species of Chlamydomonas algae from the ice-covered, hypersaline Lake Bonney in Antarctica use variants of an ancient gene family to synthetize the protective molecule glycerol, one of several adaptations that allow them to thrive in this extreme environment. The surprising ability of many microorganisms, such as these lake algae, to survive under extreme conditions has led many scientists to revise their views on the possibility of extraterrestrial life. (2020-08-20)

Microbes living on air a global phenomenon
UNSW researchers have found their previous discovery of bacteria living on air in Antarctica is likely a process that occurs globally, further supporting the potential existence of microbial life on alien planets. (2020-08-18)

Equatorial winds ripple down to Antarctica
A CIRES-led team has uncovered a critical connection between winds at Earth's equator and atmospheric waves 6,000 miles away at the South Pole. The team has found, for the first time, evidence of a Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) -- an atmospheric circulation pattern that originates at the equator--at McMurdo, Antarctica. (2020-08-17)

Penguins are Aussies. Or are they Kiwis?
UC Berkeley and Pontifical Catholic University of Chile researchers sequenced the genomes of all 18 recognized species of penguin to assemble a family tree, showing that the largest of the penguins - king and emperor - split off from all other penguins not long after penguins arose 22 million years ago in Australia and New Zealand. Other penguins diversified after Drake's Passage opened, revving up the circumpolar current and allowing penguins to spread throughout the southern hemisphere. (2020-08-17)

People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world. (2020-08-13)

Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean
A Japanese research team observed a new species of polychaetes amid the seafloor materials collected near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. They named it 'Flabelligena Gillet', 2001. (2020-08-12)

How the seafloor of the Antarctic Ocean is changing - and the climate is following suit
Experts have reconstructed the depth of the Southern Ocean at key phases in the last 34 million years of the Antarctic's climate history (2020-08-04)

Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird. (2020-08-04)

Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny zircon grains commonly found in the Earth's continental rock record to determine their ages and chemical compositions. The study was published recently in the international peer-reviewed journal Terra Nova. (2020-08-04)

Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth
A research team led by Prof. SHANG Zhaohui from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) has proved that Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth. (2020-08-03)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.