Current Antenna News and Events

Current Antenna News and Events, Antenna News Articles.
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Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation
A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips. (2021-02-18)

Origami-inspired antenna technology for use in small satellites
In a brand-new study, scientists from Korea and the USA have revealed a novel antenna design for use in CubeSat nanosatellites using state-of-the-art communications systems like 6G communications. Using theoretical knowledge based on origami theory, mechanical dynamics, and antenna array principles, the researchers built a small, lightweight, and reconfigurable antenna for CubeSat depending on operational mode selected. This could potentially mark the beginning of a new era in satellite communications! (2021-02-11)

Capturing free-space optical light for high-speed wifi
Visible and infrared light can carry more data than radio waves, but has always been confined to a hard-wired, fiber-optic cable. Working with Facebook's Connectivity Lab, a Duke research team has now made a major advance toward the dream of ditching the fiber in fiber optics. (2021-02-11)

Pushed to the limit: A CMOS-based transceiver for beyond 5G applications at 300 GHz
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and NTT Corporation develop a novel CMOS-based transceiver for wireless communications at the 300 GHz band, enabling future beyond-5G applications. Their design addresses the challenges of operating CMOS technology at its practical limit and represents the first wideband CMOS phased-array system to operate at such elevated frequencies. (2021-02-05)

Development of rapid method for extraction of natural blue chromophore from cyanobacteria
A research group at Toyohashi University of Technology succeeded in developing an efficient and rapid extraction method for Phycocyanobilin (PCB) by treating cyanobacterial cells with alcohol under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions. They also demonstrated that this method can be applied to the isotopic labeling of PCB and its reconstitution with photoswitch protein. This technique is expected to lead to the development of new functional foods and medicines and the structural elucidation of various PCB-binding photoswitches. (2021-01-26)

A potent weapon against lymphomas
MDC researchers have developed a new approach to CAR T-cell therapy. The team has shown in Nature Communications that the procedure is very effective, especially when it comes to fighting follicular lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the most common type of blood cancer in adults. (2021-01-11)

Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae -- including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advantage of different wavelengths of light than other photosynthetic organisms. The study, published Jan. 6, 2020 in Science Advances, yields insights relevant to future energy applications. (2021-01-06)

UBCO research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up. In a follow-up study from one released previously this year, Assistant Professor Mohammad Zarifi and his team at UBCO's Okanagan MicroElectronics and Gigahertz Applications (OMEGA) Lab, have broadened the scope and functionality of their ice sensors. (2020-12-17)

Pizza can help address the dark matter mystery?
The IBS research team developed a novel multiple-cell cavity ('pizza cavity') haloscope that will extend the axion search band to higher-frequency regions. (2020-12-11)

Imitation mosquito ears help identify mosquito species and sex
Using an imitation ''ear'' modeled on the organs that mosquitos use to hear, researchers have identified a mosquito's species and sex using sound -- just like mosquitos do themselves. The researchers hope this bioinspired detector could someday be used in the field to save lives by aiding in more selective pesticide use and possibly preventing mosquitos from mating. A presentation of the new research will be given as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-07)

Smellicopter: an obstacle-avoiding drone that uses a live moth antenna to seek out smells
A University of Washington-led team has developed Smellicopter: an autonomous drone that uses a live antenna from a moth to navigate toward smells. Smellicopter can also sense and avoid obstacles as it travels through the air. (2020-12-07)

Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, were recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and could have rammifications for mobile, wearable and connected ''internet of things'' technology. (2020-11-30)

Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts
Recently, a long-form review titled ''Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts'' was published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences Vol. 64, No.1. This article, co-authored by 50 researchers from 24 scientific research institutes, colleges, and companies both at home and abroad, provides a comprehensive survey of the latest progress and developmental trends about 6G networks. (2020-11-25)

CCNY researchers overcome barriers for bio-inspired solar energy harvesting materials
Inspired by nature, researchers at The City College of New York (CCNY) can demonstrate a synthetic strategy to stabilize bio-inspired solar energy harvesting materials. Their findings, published in the latest issue of Nature Chemistry, could be a significant breakthrough in functionalizing molecular assemblies for future solar energy conversion technologies. (2020-11-23)

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains. The finding, which is based on studies on a rare congenital brain disease, delivers an important piece of data in our knowledge about how the human brain is formed during development. (2020-11-16)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

Infrared light antenna powers molecular motor
Light-controlled molecular motors can be used to create functional materials, to provide autonomous motion or in systems that can respond on command, for example, to open drug-containing vesicles. For biological applications, this requires the motors to be driven by low-energy, low-intensity light that penetrates tissue. Chemists at the University of Groningen designed a rotary motor that is efficiently powered by near-infrared light, through adding an antenna to the motor molecule. (2020-10-28)

Sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity could bolster thermal imaging
Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar. (2020-10-01)

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19
Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements may have improved significantly during the pandemic, at least at some stations. The results show which factors should be considered in the future when installing GPS antennas. (2020-09-23)

Paving the way for tunable graphene plasmonic THz amplifiers
Tohoku University Professor Taiichi Otsuji has led a team of international researchers in successfully demonstrating a room-temperature coherent amplification of terahertz (THz) radiation in graphene, electrically driven by a dry cell battery. (2020-09-07)

Miniature antenna enables robotic teaming in complex environments
A new, miniature, low-frequency antenna with enhanced bandwidth will enable robust networking among compact, mobile robots in complex environments. (2020-09-01)

Energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks
Combining NOMA with mmWave technology in UAV communication networks is promising to enhance the network performance. Spectrum-efficient mmWave transmission schemes have been extensively investigated in existing literatures. However, energy efficiency is of paramount importance for UAVs due to their limited energy storage. Recently, researchers from Dalian University of Technology have developed an energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks by jointly optimizing the UAV placement, hybrid precoding and power allocation. (2020-08-24)

NIST's SAMURAI measures 5G communications channels precisely
Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a flexible, portable measurement system to support design and repeatable laboratory testing of fifth-generation (5G) wireless communications devices with unprecedented accuracy across a wide range of signal frequencies and scenarios. (2020-08-10)

Tradeoff between the eyes and nose helps flies find their niche
The size of a fly's eyes and nose reflect both its behaviour during mating and its habitat preferences, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-04)

Temporal aiming with temporal metamaterials
Achieving a controllable manipulation of electromagnetic waves is important in many applications. Towards this goal, scientists from the UK and USA have proposed a new way to control the direction of wave-propagation in real time using temporal metamaterials having temporal permittivities that are rapidly changed in time from isotropic to anisotropic values. This new technique, which the authors named temporal aiming, will open new avenues for future real-time manipulation of electromagnetic waves using 4D metamaterial platforms. (2020-07-21)

Catalyzing a green future
Highly modular metal-organic framework-based materials show great potential for photocatalytic hydrogen production. (2020-06-22)

Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst
Rice University engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants. (2020-06-22)

Researchers develop a compact 28 GHz transceiver supporting dual-polarized MIMO
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and NEC Corporation have jointly developed a 28 GHz phased-array transceiver supporting dual-polarized MIMO for fifth-generation mobile communications system (5G) radio units. Advances in 5G will benefit an array of industries ranging from healthcare, manufacturing and transportation to education and entertainment that require high bandwidth and high-quality connectivity. (2020-06-16)

Acoustics put a fresh spin on electron transitions
Electrons are very much at the mercy of magnetic fields, which scientists can manipulate to control the electrons and their angular momentum -- i.e. their 'spin.' (2020-06-10)

Army researchers enhance communications for multi-agent teaming
Army researchers are collaborating to enhance multi-agent teaming capabilities for the Soldier that will lead to improved situational awareness and communication capabilities on the battlefield. (2020-06-08)

Marine biology: Spiny lobster noises may be heard up to 3 km away
Noises produced by European spiny lobsters -- known as antennal rasps -- may be detectable up to 3 km underwater, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2020-05-21)

A clue as to why it's so hard to wake up on a cold winter's morning
Do you remember the challenge of waking up on winter's cold, dark days? Northwestern University neurobiologists have uncovered a clue to what's behind this behavior. In a study of the fruit fly, the researchers have identified a 'thermometer' circuit that relays information about external cold temperature from the fly antenna to the higher brain. They show how, through this circuit, seasonally cold and dark conditions can inhibit neurons within the fly brain that promote activity and wakefulness, particularly in the morning. (2020-05-21)

Inexpensively locating friendly (and unfriendly) radio waves
Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a low-cost method for passively locating sources of radio waves such as Wi-Fi and cellular communication signals. The technique could lead to inexpensive devices that can find radio wave devices like cellular phones or Wi-Fi emitters and cameras that can capture images using the radio waves already bouncing around the world all around us. (2020-05-12)

Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde. (2020-05-06)

Can high-power microwaves reduce the launch cost of space-bound rockets?
University of Tsukuba researchers calculated the efficiencies of four important features of microwave-beam-powered propulsion systems for rockets. These findings are critical to minimizing or possibly reducing the cost of rocket propulsion systems. (2020-04-20)

Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reinventing the mirror, at least for microwaves, potentially replacing the familiar 3-D dishes and microwave horns we see on rooftops and cell towers with flat panels that are compact, versatile, and better adapted for modern communication technologies. (2020-03-23)

Army scientists create quantum sensor that covers entire radio frequency spectrum
A quantum sensor could give Soldiers a way to detect communication signals over the entire radio frequency spectrum, from 0 to 100 GHz, said researchers from the Army. (2020-03-19)

How does an intersex bee behave?
A group of scientists and students working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Barro Colorado Island studied the circadian rhythm of a bee gynandromorph: a rare condition that results in the expression of both male and female characteristics. (2020-03-18)

Engineers crack 58-year-old puzzle on way to quantum breakthrough
A mishap during an experiment led UNSW quantum computing researchers to crack a mystery that had stood since 1961. (2020-03-11)

Water splitting observed on the nanometer scale
Hydrogen is being traded as the energy carrier of the future. To date, existing methodologies have not been able to elucidate how exactly the electrochemical process of water splitting takes place at the molecular scale on a catalyst surface. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz have now developed a new method to investigate such processes 'live' on the nanometer scale. (2020-03-05)

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