Current Anterior Cruciate Ligament News and Events

Current Anterior Cruciate Ligament News and Events, Anterior Cruciate Ligament News Articles.
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A novel gene discovery associated with a development disorder of pituitary origin
A study carried out at the University of Helsinki investigated pituitary dwarfism in Karelian Bear Dogs and found a link to a variant of the POU1F1 gene. The results can also help understand the gene's significance to the human pituitary gland's development and function. (2021-02-22)

Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently. (2021-02-22)

Discovering structural diverseness of neurons between brain areas and between cases
Dr. Masanari Itokawa who is the vice president of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and colleague by the collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8) and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory identified that the schizophrenia cases showed a thin and tortuous neuronal network compared with the controls (2021-02-10)

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts
A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts - readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells - may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses. Findings from the study, conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, appear in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. (2021-02-08)

'Stealthy' stem cells better for treating tendon injuries in horses
Treating equine donor stem cells with a growth factor called TGF-β2 may allow them to avoid ''tripping'' the immune response in recipients, according to new research. (2021-02-04)

Social transmission of pain, fear has different targets in mouse brain
Social contact can transfer the feeling of pain or fear in several animal species, including humans, but the exact neural mechanisms for this transmission are still being studied. (2021-01-07)

The brain network driving changes in consciousness
The loss and return of consciousness is linked to the same network of brain regions for both sleep and anesthesia, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-12-28)

Protein tells developing cells to stick together
Tohoku University scientists have, for the first time, provided experimental evidence that cell stickiness helps them stay sorted within correct compartments during development. How tightly cells clump together, known as cell adhesion, appears to be enabled by a protein better known for its role in the immune system. The findings were detailed in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-24)

Astigmatism measures and corneal power obtained with different devices
The aim of the research is to compare the keratometric and total corneal astigmatism measures provided by three different technologies as well as to assess the level of interchangeability among them. (2020-12-22)

Antigen tests -- are self-collected nasal swabs a reliable option?
Under certain conditions, antigen testing using self-collected swabs from the anterior nose may constitute a reliable alternative to antigen testing using nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health professionals. This is the conclusion drawn by a team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Heidelberg University Hospital. Results from their study have been published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2020-12-21)

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes (2020-12-21)

Ensuring a proper body plan
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the enzyme lysine demethylase 7a helps ensure the ordered axial development of the mouse embryo by modulating Hox genes which specify positional characteristics along the head-to-tail axis. Their findings suggest that the enzyme modulates Hox gene activation by regulating the repressive histone mark H3K9me2, an epigenetic modification of the DNA packaging protein Histone H3. This study opens avenues for further research into evolutionary developmental biology. (2020-12-16)

Molecules derived from omega-3 can regenerate inflamed periodontal tissue
An in vitro study by a Brazilian researcher shows that maresin and resolvin synthesized from fatty acid stimulate periodontal ligament stem cells even in the presence of inflammation (2020-12-16)

Genes play a role in common knee injury
It has long been known that the choice of shoe, surface and type of sport can all be contributing factors when someone suffers an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now observed that genes also play a decisive role. (2020-12-15)

From the woodworking shop to the operating room: New technique uses mortise and tenon joints to repair unstable shoulders
Orthopaedic surgery techniques for treatment of recurrent shoulder instability are effective, but prone to problems with nonunion of bone grafts held in place by screws alone. A new technique - borrowing a design used for centuries in Chinese architecture and woodworking - provides an effective approach to shoulder stabilization, suggests a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-24)

Pinning down how the brain predicts the consequences of choices
Learning to predict the outcomes of actions happens through two separate cognitive processes. Though distinct, it is frequently difficult to tell which scheme an individual is executing at any given instance. A new study in mice implements a novel experimental approach that untangles the two, and pins down how a specific brain structure represents the various features involved in the decision making process. (2020-11-04)

Brain region implicated in predicting the consequences of actions
A new study highlights the sophisticated mental machinery that helps the brain simulate the results of different actions and make the best choice. (2020-11-04)

Study points way to possible new treatment for ligament injuries
A new exosomes study released in STEM CELLS may lead to future treatment for ligament injuries. (2020-11-03)

Happy endings trip up the brain's decision-making
The brain keeps track of the value of an experience as well as how it unfolds over time; overemphasizing the ending may trigger poor decision-making, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-10-19)

Study upends understanding about joint injuries
An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can lead to severe osteoarthritis in both animal and human patients. Now, a new interdisciplinary study on the protein that lubricates our joints says that lubricant may actually be a precursor of joint disease. (2020-10-14)

Deep learning model provides rapid detection of stroke-causing blockages
A sophisticated type of artificial intelligence (AI) called deep learning can help rapidly detect blockages in the arteries that supply blood to the head, potentially speeding the onset of life-saving treatment, according to a study. (2020-09-29)

How the brain balances emotion and reason
Navigating through life requires balancing emotion and reason, a feat accomplished by the brain region ''area 32'' of the anterior cingulate cortex. The area maintains emotional equilibrium by relaying information between cognitive and emotional brain regions, according to new research in monkeys published in JNeurosci. (2020-09-28)

African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are known for their unique hunting style, often referred to as ''exhaustive predation'', in which they chase their prey to exhaustion, rather than hunting using speed, strength, or stealth. They are also unique among the dog clade in having only four full digits on their front paws. Until recently, it was unclear how these unique behavioral and anatomical features would affect their forelimb morphology. (2020-09-07)

Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs are equally effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs collected by healthcare providers are equally effective for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study conducted by ARUP Laboratories and University of Utah (U of U) Health. (2020-08-20)

Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)

Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (2020-08-13)

Impact of family income on learning in children shaped by hippocampus in brain
A new study by a team of researchers at the University of Toronto identifies the region of the brain's hippocampus that links low income with decreased memory and language ability in children. The research shows it is the anterior hippocampus that is associated with differences in cognition related to income. (2020-08-12)

Complex developmental patterns are under the control of surprisingly simple signals
Princeton University researchers explored how patterns of protein activity direct fly embryonic development by using 'optogenetic' techniques to rapidly and precisely turn Ras/Erk signaling on and off. A paper published July 23 in Current Biology by Heath Johnson, Nareg Djabrayan, Stanislav Shvartsman and Jared Toettcher describes these findings. (2020-07-23)

When should you neuter your dog to avoid health risks?
A new, 10-year study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, examined 35 dog breeds and found vulnerability from neutering, and the age at which they are neutered, varies greatly depending on the breed. (2020-07-15)

Your brain needs to be ready to remember?
What happens in the hippocampus even before people attempt to form memories may impact whether they remember. Study suggests 'encoding mode' may play an important role in memory formation. (2020-06-01)

New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg--with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy. (2020-05-13)

Like a molecular knob: That is how a gene controls the electrical activity of the brain
Its name is Foxg1, it is a gene, and its unprecedented role is the protagonist of the discovery just published on the journal Cerebral Cortex. Foxg1 was already known for being a ''master gene'' able to coordinate the action of hundreds of other genes. As this new study reports, the ''excitability'' of neurons, namely their ability to respond to stimuli, communicating between each other and carrying out all their tasks, also depends on this gene. (2020-05-08)

The digital diagnostic helper: Apple Watch detects severe coronary ischemia
Apple watches have long been able to record electrocardiograms (ECGs) and send warnings in the event of an irregular heart rhythm such as atrial fibrillation. Now a team of cardiologists from the Cardiopraxis Mainz and the Department of Cardiology of the University Medical Center Mainz discovered that, with the help of an Apple Watch, cardiac arrhythmias as well as coronary ischemia can be identified. This is what they reportin the European Heart Journal. (2020-04-30)

Marshall School of Medicine team explores surgery technology resulting in fewer incisions
Through the use of a newly developed needle arthroscope, incisionless and single-incision surgical procedures are possible for repairing certain types of knee and shoulder injuries suggests a series of Marshall University studies published in Arthroscopy Techniques, a companion to Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery. (2020-04-16)

Researchers develop synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. Previous synthetic tendon grafts have led to poor outcomes and implant rejection. Australia has one of the highest rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the world -- and up to 25 percent of surgeries require revision. (2020-04-14)

Ocular scientists advise contact lens & spectacles wearers during COVID-19 pandemic
A new peer-reviewed paper from five prominent ocular scientists will help eye care practitioners instruct and reassure contact lens wearers during the global COVID-19 / coronavirus pandemic. Published in Contact Lens & Anterior Eye, 'The COVID-19 Pandemic: Important Considerations for Contact Lens Practitioners' delves into multiple aspects of eye health amidst the global health crisis, with a specific emphasis on the safe use of contact lenses. (2020-04-13)

Russian scientists has developed and introduced new laser method for cataract surgery
Scientists from ITMO and the S.N. Fyodorov Eye Microsurgery Complex came up with a technology where a laser is used both to destroy the clouded eye lens and to stimulate the regeneration of adjacent tissue. (2020-04-07)

Anterior insula activation restores prosocial behavior in animal model of opioid addiction
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have shown that chemogenetic activation of the anterior insula restores prosocial behavior in an animal model of opioid addiction and empathy. The findings suggest an important role for the anterior insula in the brain response to addiction. (2020-04-03)

'Little Foot' skull reveals how this more than 3 million year old human ancestor lived
High-resolution micro-CT scanning of the skull of the fossil specimen known as 'Little Foot' has revealed some aspects of how this Australopithecus species used to live more than 3 million years ago. (2020-03-17)

How brain biology promotes starvation in patients with anorexia nervosa
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in brain circuitry that contribute to starvation and weight loss in people with anorexia nervosa. (2020-03-12)

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