Current Anterior Cruciate Ligament News and Events | Page 2

Current Anterior Cruciate Ligament News and Events, Anterior Cruciate Ligament News Articles.
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Scientists monitored brains replaying memories in real time
In a study of epilepsy patients, researchers at the National Institutes of Health monitored the electrical activity of thousands of individual brain cells, called neurons, as patients took memory tests. They found that the firing patterns of the cells that occurred when patients learned a word pair were replayed fractions of a second before they successfully remembered the pair. (2020-03-05)

Optimizing use of the 'hug hormone' to help those with social difficulties
New research has provided important insight into how oxytocin could be administered in a more targeted and effective way to help treat social problems that occur in a range of psychiatric disorders. (2020-03-03)

Biophysics: Orientation of protein patterns
During embryogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the first cell division occurs transverse to the long axis of the fertilized egg. In a new study, biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown how this axis is reliably selected. (2020-01-31)

More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure
It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why. (2020-01-28)

How the brain processes rewards
Researchers from HSE University, Skoltech and the University of Toronto analyzed data from 190 fMRI studies and found out that food, sex and money implicate similar brain regions whereas different types of reward favor the left and right hemispheres differently. The paper is to be published in Brain Imaging and Behavior. (2020-01-23)

Blue light triggers memory and emphatic fear in mice via a non-invasive approach
IBS researchers have engineered an improved biological tool that controls calcium (Ca2+) levels in the brain via blue light. This monster-OptoSTIM1 causes a change in mice's fear learning behavior without the need of optic fiber implants in the brain. (2020-01-21)

Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion
Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion, and this information transfer is at least partially mediated by a brain region called the anterior cingulate cortex, according to a study published Dec. 5 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Christian Keysers of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues. (2019-12-05)

Study finds most surfing injuries involve shoulder or knee, surgery usually not required
A study published in the journal Sports Health characterizes MRI patterns of acute surfing-related injuries in patients seeking care at HSS. Researchers also report on the proportion of those injuries that required orthopedic surgical intervention. The study found that the most common injuries involved the knee or shoulder. Surgery was usually not necessary. (2019-11-06)

Patients with mood, anxiety disorders share abnormalities in brain's control circuit
New research published today in JAMA Psychiatry shows for the first time that patients with mood and anxiety disorders share the same abnormalities in regions of the brain involved in emotional and cognitive control. (2019-10-30)

Neurofeedback increases self-esteem by rebalancing brain circuits in depression
A study published in the journal Neuroimage: Clinical found that patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who had recovered from symptoms, were able to strengthen some of their brain connections, thereby increasing their self-esteem. The research showed that connectivity between certain brain regions - previously found to be decreased when feeling guilt in people with a history of depression - could be strengthened in a single session of neurofeedback training through functional magnetic resonance imaging. (2019-10-10)

Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition. (2019-10-10)

Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems. The authors discuss areas where the current evidence base is weak or controversial and recommend where further studies are required. (2019-10-01)

Brain stimulation prevents anxiety-induced decrease in motor performances
Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology and the Centre national de la recherché scientifique used fMRI to discover a new neural mechanism involving the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex to explain how anxiety deteriorates physical performance. Moreover, the performance deterioration was rescued by suppressing brain activity with transcranial magnetic stimulation to the dACC. The findings would provide a new therapeutic strategy for athletes, musicians and other performers susceptible to anxiety during performance. (2019-09-24)

HSS researchers identify factor essential for tendon growth
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is essential for allowing tendons to adapt to physical activity and grow properly, according to basic science research by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). The findings provide a strong rationale for pursuing clinical trials to explore IGF1 as a new target for treating tendon injuries in humans. (2019-09-24)

Comparing effectiveness of 2 surgical methods for uterine prolapse
Uterine prolapse happens when weakened muscles and ligaments no longer provide enough support for the uterus, which then protrudes into or out of the vagina. This randomized clinical trial compared the effectiveness of two surgical methods to treat women: a vaginal hysterectomy to remove the uterus with ligament suspension to support remaining tissue or uterus-sparing suspension techniques, known as hysteropexy. (2019-09-17)

A new duck-billed dinosaur, Kamuysaurus japonicus, identified
The dinosaur, whose nearly complete skeleton was unearthed from 72 million year old marine deposits in Mukawa Town in northern Japan, belongs to a new genus and species of a herbivorous hadrosaurid dinosaur, according to the study published in Scientific Reports. The scientists named the dinosaur Kamuysaurus japonicus. (2019-09-05)

Scientists uncover key new molecules that could help to tackle tooth loss and regeneration
New research published in the Journal of Dental Research has shed light on the science behind the formation of the periodontal ligament, which helps keep the tooth stable in the jawbone. This improved understanding will help scientists work towards regenerating the tissues that support teeth. This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in rodent teeth and human cells. (2019-08-30)

Simple computational models can help predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis
Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, in collaboration with the University of California in San Francisco, Cleveland Clinic, the University of Queensland, the University of Oulu and Kuopio University Hospital, have developed a method to predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis in patients with ligament ruptures using a simplified computational model. The researchers also verified the model predictions against measured structural and compositional changes in the knee joint between follow-up times (2019-08-20)

AJR publishes gender affirmation surgery primer for radiologists
Since gender incongruence is now categorized as a sexual health condition, an ahead-of-print article published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) contends that all subspecialties must be prepared to identify radiologic correlates and distinguish key postoperative variations in the three major categories of gender affirmation surgery: genital reconstruction, body contouring, and maxillofacial contouring. (2019-08-19)

Bullet shape, velocity determine blood spatter patterns
Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located, and researchers have worked toward better understanding the fluid dynamics at play during gunshot spatters. In the Physics of Fluids, they propose a model for the disintegration of a liquid due to an arbitrarily shaped projectile. Their model focuses on providing predictive models of gunshot blood atomization and droplet flight and spattering. (2019-08-06)

'Kneeding' a break: First evidence ACL injuries an overuse failure
Repetitive knee stress and failure to accommodate sufficient rest between periods of strenuous exercise may be key factors behind the rapid rise in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in world sport, a new international study has found. (2019-07-23)

Timing of spay, neuter tied to higher risk of obesity and orthopedic injuries in dogs
Spaying or neutering large-breed dogs can put them at a higher risk for obesity and, if done when the dog is young, nontraumatic orthopedic injuries, reports a new study based on data from the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. The spay/neuter study was published today in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-07-17)

Athletes at a higher risk for ACL injury after return to sport
Young athletes who do not achieve a 90 percent score on a battery of tests that measure fitness to return to athletic competition, including quadricep strength, are at increased risk for a second knee injury, according to research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine. (2019-07-14)

Outcomes of non-operatively treated elbow ulnar in professional baseball players
Professional baseball players with a low-grade elbow injury that occurs on the humeral side of the elbow have a better chance of returning to throw and returning to play, and a lower risk of ulnar collateral ligament surgery than players who suffered more severe injuries on the ulnar side of the elbow. The research was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine. (2019-07-13)

Lateral extra-articular tenodesis reduces hamstring autograft
The addition of lateral extra-articular tenodesis to a hamstring autograft in knee surgery in young active patients significantly reduces graft failure and persistent anterolateral rotatory laxity at two years post operatively. The research, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Sports Medicine Society, received the O'Donoghue Sports Injury Award. (2019-07-12)

Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates
Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was conducted by group of clinicians led by Dr. Christopher C. Kaeding of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. (2019-07-12)

Does platelet-rich plasma therapy lower risk of meniscus repair
The use of platelet-rich plasma therapy can reduce the risk of a second meniscus failure after operation but does not seem to protect patients who have had surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament, according to research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine. (2019-07-11)

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development
Researchers have created a new 3D model of human embryonic tissue that promises to shed light on critical components of development -- including processes that go awry during pregnancy complications. (2019-07-01)

Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. (2019-06-28)

Study looks at opioid use after knee surgery
A small study looked at whether reducing the number of opioid tablets prescribed after knee surgery would reduce postoperative use and if preoperative opioid-use education would reduce it even more. The study included 264 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery at a single academic ambulatory surgery center. (2019-06-25)

Does stimulation of the brain's dorsal anterior insula trigger ecstasy?
The epileptic 'aura' is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure. Investigators tested three epileptic patients prior to potential surgery to try to determine where their seizures originate. They observed that these patients reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula of the brain was stimulated. Their findings in the journal Brain Stimulation, published by Elsevier, provide additional support of a major role played by the dorsal anterior insula in ecstatic experiences. (2019-06-24)

Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis
A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans. The treatment, developed by Cornell University biomedical engineers, is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring joint lubricant that binds to the surface of cartilage in joints and acts as a cushion during high-impact activities, such as running. (2019-06-19)

Introduced a new paradigm of cell transplantation with scaffold microrobots
Professor Hongsoo Choi's team developed a microrobot that can precisely transplant stem cells in various in vivo and vitro environments. Expects to improve the efficiency of treating degenerative neural disorders such as Alzheimer by accurately and safely delivering to a desired location. (2019-06-17)

Researchers explore augmented ACL reconstruction procedure
An innovative procedure that explores the use of amnion, bone marrow concentrate and suture tape in ACL reconstruction may result in earlier return to play protocols for athletes, suggests a new study from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. (2019-06-03)

Seeing disfigured faces prompts negative brain and behavior responses
A new study led by Penn Medicine researchers, which published today in Scientific Reports, found that people have implicit negative biases against people with disfigured faces, without knowingly harboring such biases. (2019-05-29)

Study reveals breakthrough in understanding long-term memory retrieval
UNLV researchers have discovered a novel method for how two parts of the brain -- the hippocampus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) -- work together to retrieve long-term memories. (2019-05-21)

Young athletes who require ACL reconstruction may benefit from additional procedure
An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, an injury of the knee, can be devastating to a young athlete. While the ACL can be reconstructed through surgery, there is a high risk of re-injury in patients under the age of 25. In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute have shown that performing an additional surgical procedure called lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) may reduce the risk of ACL re-injury in young athletes. (2019-05-21)

Space travel and your joints
A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints? Researchers found early signs of cartilage breakdown in the mice, suggesting that the reduced biomechanical forces of spaceflight are at play on the musculoskeletal system. (2019-05-21)

Novel technique reduces obstruction risk in heart valve replacement
Researchers at the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a novel technique that prevents the obstruction of blood flow, a common fatal complication of transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). The new method, called LAMPOON, may increase treatment options for high-risk patients previously ineligible for heart valve procedures. (2019-05-20)

Transplanted cells reveal early signs of type 1 diabetes
By the time type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most of the insulin-producing beta cells have already been destroyed. Now, using an innovative transplantation technique, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have been able to intervene to save the beta cells in mice by discovering early signs of the disease. The study is published in Diabetologia, the scientific journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). (2019-05-14)

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