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Current Anterior Cruciate Ligament News and Events, Anterior Cruciate Ligament News Articles.
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How the olfactory brain affects memory
How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood. Two neuroscientists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered a new aspect of how the processing of odours impacts memory centres. They showed that the piriform cortex -- a part of the olfactory brain -- has a direct influence on information storage in our most important memory structure, the hippocampus. (2019-04-29)

The ACR and the Arthritis Foundation present new guidelines offering therapeutic approaches and treatment options for juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), in partnership with the Arthritis Foundation (AF), released two guidelines on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). One guideline aims to provide therapeutic approaches for non-systemic polyarthritis, sacroilitis and enthesitis; and the other focuses on the screening, monitoring and treatment of JIA with associated uveitis. (2019-04-29)

Alerting patients to their risk of gum disease improves inflammation and dental hygiene
In a new study published today in the Journal of Periodontology researchers found that using psychological techniques to communicate the risk of developing periodontal disease to patients improved dental hygiene over a three month period. (2019-04-17)

Low-intensity ultrasound can change decision-making process in the brain, research shows
This is a peer-reviewed empirical study conducted in animals (macaque monkeys) The study shows how low-intensity ultrasonic waves can be used to generate or suppress electrical signals in the brain, modulating normal brain function. The process is reversible. This study applies to counterfactual thinking, and does not suggest you can directly change someone's personality (2019-04-15)

How education may stave off cognitive decline
Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci. The identified genes and molecular pathways could provide insight into factors that help keep the brain sharp in old age. (2019-04-08)

Researchers find brain molecular features associated with years of education
A study led by a team from the University of Barcelona identified greater cortical thickness in the frontal lobe in a group of old people with high levels of education. The study of the molecular architecture revealed these areas feature a relative overexpression of gene families involved in the synaptic transmission and the activation of the immune response. Results may explain how high levels of education are associated with the preserved cognitive function in the elderly. (2019-04-08)

How the brain 'mentalizes' cooperation
Researchers identify a part of the brain that helps execute cooperative tasks. (2019-03-26)

Time maps: How our brain perceives time
What happens in our brain when we listen to the rhythmic pace of a song or when, at the traffic light, the light is red and we are trembling awaiting the green? For the first time in humans, an imaging study shows that in a specific area of the brain, the so-called 'supplementary motor area (SMA),' a time map exists. The study shows that distinct portions of the SMA respond preferentially to different durations. (2019-03-22)

It's no Fortnite, but it's helping stroke survivors move again
Severely impaired stroke survivors are regaining function in their arms after sometimes decades of immobility, thanks to a new video game-led training device invented by Northwestern Medicine scientists. (2019-03-19)

Blood flow restriction therapy may protect against bone loss following ACL reconstruction
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients often face bone and muscle loss immediately following the procedure. Researchers presenting their work today at the AOSSM/AANA Specialty Day note that combining blood flow restriction (BFR) therapy with traditional rehabilitation efforts may slow bone loss and reduce return to function time. (2019-03-16)

Study: Surgery for herniated discs in neck can be safely performed in outpatient setting
Surgery to remove multiple herniated or degenerated discs in the neck, a procedure known as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), can be safely performed in an outpatient setting in select patients, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City. (2019-03-14)

Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity in the cortex in OCD patients
Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity distributed throughout different regions of the cerebral cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder. This fact could explain the presence of intrusive thoughts in this patient population as a result of inefficient sensory filtering. (2019-02-27)

How to make the push-up work for you
If you want to improve your golf swing, softball pitch, or tennis serve, the push-up is for you. The push-up is a highly adaptable exercise that can be tailored to help individuals with specific needs, say a team of UWaterloo researchers who studied a modified push-up, called a 'push-up plus.' (2019-02-19)

Boosting glutamate reduces anxiety in monkeys
Researchers studying male and female marmosets have homed in on the primate brain circuitry responsible for individual differences in overall anxiety. Their findings, published in JNeurosci, show that increasing levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the hippocampus normalizes anxious monkeys' 'fight or flight' response. (2019-02-04)

UMD study finds exercise benefits brains, changes blood flow in older adults
Exercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think. A new study published by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease showed that exercise was associated with improved brain function in a group of adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a decrease in the blood flow in key brain regions. (2019-01-31)

Air pollution in Mexico City is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease
A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Valle de México, Boise State, Universidad Veracruzana, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría and Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain Research heightens together with German company Analytik Jena concerns over the evolving and relentless Alzheimer's pathology observed in young Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) urbanites. These findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2018-12-21)

Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the study provides a new story for inner ear evolution that began with the last common ancestor of modern vertebrates. (2018-12-05)

What makes rats relapse
Activation of the anterior insular cortex -- a brain region implicated in drug abuse -- rather than drinking history or motivation for alcohol predicts relapse after a month of abstinence, reports a study of male rats published in JNeurosci. The results may explain why some individuals are more likely than others to relapse. (2018-12-03)

How you respond to drama depends on if you are a holistic or analytical thinker
Aalto University researchers showed volunteers the film My Sister's Keeper on a screen while the research subjects were lying down in an MRI scanner. The study compared the volunteers' brain activity, and concluded that holistic thinkers saw the film more similarly with each other than analytical thinkers. In addition, holistic thinkers processed the film's moral issues and factual connections within the film more similarly with each other than the analytical thinkers. (2018-11-30)

A smartphone and new software could help save infants born preterm
A new algorithm combined with a handheld, smartphone-based device could aid health care workers in remote locations to estimate degrees of prematurity for affected infants. Such information can be critical for administering life-saving treatments. (2018-11-20)

Where the brain turns quality and quantity into value
Researchers have pinpointed a part of the human brain responsible for 'on-the-fly' decision-making. According to the findings published in JNeurosci, the anterior cingulate cortex integrates disparate information about the desirability and amount of an option to inform choice. (2018-11-19)

MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible
New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better -- but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behavior the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing. (2018-11-19)

Chew on this: Two new studies reveal secrets of early dinosaur and mammal tooth evolution
Two new research papers take a bite out of the mysteries around how early dinosaurs and mammals evolved their unique tooth replacement and anchoring systems. (2018-11-07)

ACL re-injury appears to be a subject of 'relative risk'
Children with immediate family members who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears have more complicated recoveries when they need surgical reconstruction themselves. (2018-11-02)

Pseudarthrosis following single-level ACDF is five times more likely when a PEEK interbody device is used
Researchers found pseudarthrosis (lack of new bone regrowth) to be five times more likely after a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody spacer device had been used to bridge the gap between vertebrae during cervical spine surgery than after a structural (bone) allograft had been used. (2018-10-30)

University of Barcelona researchers describe a new anatomic structure in the ankle
Researchers describe a new ligament in the lateral side of the ankle. (2018-10-30)

Electrical properties of dendrites help explain our brain's unique computing power
MIT neuroscientists have discovered that human dendrites have very different electrical properties from those of other species. These differences may contribute to the enhanced computing power of the human brain. (2018-10-18)

The fine print
University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area. (2018-10-10)

Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution
Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development--the impact of which we see today. (2018-10-09)

Scientists uncover why you can't decide what to order for lunch
Caltech researchers explore the choice overload effect, a phenomenon that hampers the brain's ability to make a decision when there are too many options. (2018-10-01)

People can die from giving up the fight
People can die simply because they've given up, life has beaten them and they feel defeat is inescapable, according to new research. (2018-09-27)

Hemidystrophic thorax mimicking scoliosis
Pectus excavatum, pectus carinatum, Poland syndrome, sunken chest deformity, barrel chest deformity, body builder deformity, and long upper chest wall are chest wall deformities that are documented in the medical literature. (2018-09-13)

For the first time, a neural link between altruism and empathy toward strangers
Using fMRI scans of a brain region called the anterior insula, University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University researchers discovered that people who donated a kidney to an anonymous recipient were more sensitive to a stranger's fear and pain. (2018-09-11)

How brains of doers differ from those of procrastinators
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed why certain people tend to put tasks off rather than tackling them directly. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), they identified two brain areas whose volume and functional connectivity are linked to an individual's ability to control their actions. (2018-08-22)

A common ancestral gene causes body segmentation in spiders and insects
Scientists have pinpointed a key gene that controls segmentation during spider development, which reveals a further similarity to the control of segmentation in insects, a study in eLife reports. (2018-08-21)

Automated detection of focal epileptic seizures in a sentinel area of the human brain
In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure -- before the patient feels any symptoms -- through neurostimulation of the sentinel area of the brain. (2018-08-17)

New method makes spinning collagen microfibres quicker, cheaper, and easier
Scientists in Norfolk, VA (USA) have developed a new method of making collagen microfibres, which could have applications in research, medical devices and clinical treatments ranging from ligament damage to skin burns. (2018-08-14)

How to trigger innate fear response?
There are two types of fear: learned versus innate. The latter is known to be induced without any prior experience and is thus naturally encoded in the brain. A research team under Professor Jin-Hee Han in the Department of Biological Sciences identified the brain circuit responsible for regulating the innate fear response. (2018-08-07)

CPM for knee or shoulder joints: Advantage only in two therapeutic indications
Less pain in stiff shoulders and improved mobility after total knee replacement - but the final report does not confirm greater benefit in rotator cuff tears. (2018-08-06)

Liverpool researchers find treatment for ultra-rare disease
A new study published in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, conducted by a Liverpool based research collaboration involving the University of Liverpool, has identified the drug that treats the extremely rare genetic disease alkaptonuria (AKU). (2018-08-01)

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