Current Anthony Monaco News and Events

Current Anthony Monaco News and Events, Anthony Monaco News Articles.
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NIH experts discuss SARS-CoV-2 viral variants
The rise of significant variants of SARS-CoV-2 has attracted the attention of health and science experts worldwide. In an editorial published in JAMA, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases outline how these variants have arisen, concerns about whether vaccines currently authorized for use will continue to protect against new variants, and the need for a global approach to fighting SARS-CoV-2 as it spreads and acquires additional mutations. (2021-02-12)

NIH officials highlight COVID-19 vaccine facts, unknowns for healthcare providers
Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-18)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

Higher variability in glomerular filtration rate is associated with higher mortality
In this paper published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers evaluated associations between eGFR variability and subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality among SPRINT participants. They found that greater eGFR variability was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality independent of baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and other risk factors. (2020-12-14)

New report details links between widespread ocean pollution and human health risks
The new study ''Human Health and Ocean Pollution'' presents a broad and comprehensive examination of the multiple dangers to human and ecosystem health posed by pollution of the seas. Toxins in the ocean make landfall through the food chain and coastal tides, posing health risks to more than 3 billion humans, according to scientists led by the Centre Scientifique de Monaco and Boston College, with support from the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. (2020-12-03)

Treatments for people with early COVID-19 infection is an urgent research focus
COVID-19 treatments for people with early infection are needed urgently, according to a JAMA Viewpoint article by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., and colleagues. Treating people early in the course of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, would speed their recovery, reduce the likelihood that they develop severe outcomes and reduce demand on the healthcare system, they write. (2020-11-11)

Students develop tool to predict the carbon footprint of algorithms
Within the scientific community, it is estimated that artificial intelligence -- otherwise meant to serve as a means to effectively combat climate change -- will become one of the most egregious CO2 culprits should current trends continue. To raise awareness about the challenge, two University of Copenhagen students have launched a tool to calculate the carbon footprint of developing deep learning models. (2020-11-03)

Forty percent of renters can't afford essentials as a result of COVID-19
Almost 40% of Australian tenant households can't afford essentials such as bills, clothing, transport and food, after paying rent, because their incomes have reduced significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research from the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute has found. (2020-10-14)

Difficult, complex decisions underpin the future of the world's coral reefs
Effective solutions to the climate challenge threatening the world's coral reefs require complex decisions about risk and uncertainty, timing, quality versus quantity as well as which species to support for the most robust and productive future. Ultimately, we need to consider what society wants, what can be achieved and what opportunities we have for action in a rapidly closing window. A paper published today outlines the prioritisation challenges and the trade-offs that need to be weighed. (2020-08-26)

US political parties become extremist to get more votes
New mathematical modeling shows that US political parties are becoming increasingly polarized due to their quest for voters -- not because voters themselves are becoming more extremist. (2020-08-26)

Chatbots delivering psychotherapy help decrease opioid use after surgery
A study showed that patients receiving messages from a chatbot used a third fewer opioids after fracture surgery, and their overall pain level fell, too. (2020-08-17)

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds
A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates. (2020-08-10)

What's the best way to estimate and track COVID-19 mortality?
When used correctly, the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR) and the infection fatality ratio (IFR) are better measures by which to monitor COVID-19 epidemics than the commonly reported case fatality ratio (CFR), according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anthony Hauser of the University of Bern, Switzerland, and colleagues. (2020-07-28)

Air quality impacts early brain development
Does living close to roadways pose a risk to the developing brain? A UC Davis study found a link between traffic-related air pollution and an increased risk for changes in brain development relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders. (2020-06-17)

Warwick scientists discover how cells respond to fasting
As modern life-styles and high calorie diets drive the UK's obesity levels up, researchers from the University of Warwick have found how cells respond to fasting and activate the process called autophagy, which means a healthier lifestyle can be promoted to help people maintain a healthy body weight. (2020-05-26)

Fish feed foresight
As the world increasingly turns to aqua farming to feed its growing population, there's no better time than now to design an aquaculture system that is sustainable and efficient. (2020-05-20)

New insight into allergies could improve diagnosis and treatment
A study led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital point to a potential marker of these conditions and a new therapeutic strategy. (2020-05-20)

Pitt researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface. The work was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. (2020-05-13)

Development of effective COVID-19 vaccines will require unprecedented collaboration
A diversity of vaccine approaches, not a single SARS-CoV-2 vaccine or vaccine platform, must be pursued to meet the global need to protect from the continued threat of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, write Lawrence Corey, John R. Mascola, Anthony S. Fauci, and Francis S. Collins in this Policy Forum. (2020-05-11)

Survey: Most Americans want government commitment to reduce inequality
A new poll finds most Americans say the federal government should reduce inequality, amid the COVID-19-produced economic crisis. A national survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Lehigh University finds 78% of Americans agree that ''considering the spread of coronavirus in the United States and its impact on the economy and the American people,'' it is 'important' that 'the US government commit to reducing economic inequality over the next year.' (2020-04-27)

Harris Poll: Most Americans want government intervention to reduce inequality
A new poll finds most Americans say the federal government should reduce inequality, amid the Covid-19-produced economic crisis. A national survey from Harris Insights & Analytics of 2,018 Americans, conducted April 7-9, 2020, finds 78% of Americans agree that ''considering the spread of coronavirus in the United States and its impact on the economy and the American people,'' it is ''somewhat'' or ''very important'' that ''the US government commit to reducing economic inequality.'' (2020-04-16)

On-demand glass is right around the corner
A research group coordinated by physicists of the University of Trento was able to probe internal stress in colloidal glasses, a crucial step to control the mechanical properties of glasses. Their work opens the way to new types of glass for new applications. The study was published in the US journal Science Advances. (2020-03-20)

COVID-19 a reminder of the challenge of emerging infectious diseases
The emergence and rapid increase in cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, pose complex challenges to the global public health, research and medical communities, write federal scientists from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Their commentary appears in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2020-02-28)

Mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland solved
The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century. (2020-02-26)

Major discovery in the genetics of Down syndrome
New research highlights the RCAN1 gene's effect on memory and learning. (2020-02-21)

The dinosaur in the cupboard under the stairs
The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century. University of Queensland palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio discovered pieces to a decades-old puzzle in an unusual place - a cupboard under the stairs of a suburban Sydney home. (2020-02-16)

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified
Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula. (2020-02-12)

A fundamental discovery about how gene activity is regulated
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a fundamental mechanism that regulates gene activity in cells. The newly discovered mechanism targets RNA, or ribonucleic acid, a close cousin of DNA that plays an important role in cellular activity. (2020-02-03)

NIAID officials discuss novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China
The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans and sparked an outbreak. In a new JAMA Viewpoint essay, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), looks back at two earlier novel CoV outbreaks that initially caused global havoc and describes steps needed to contain the current one. (2020-01-23)

Researchers produce first laser ultrasound images of humans
MIT engineers have come up with an alternative to conventional ultrasound that doesn't require contact with the body to see inside a patient. The new laser ultrasound technique leverages an eye- and skin-safe laser system to remotely image the inside of a person. (2019-12-20)

Understanding the adolescent brain
New research from University of Alberta neuroscientists shows that the brains of adolescents struggling with mental-health issues may be wired differently from those of their healthy peers. (2019-12-20)

Efforts to end the HIV epidemic must not ignore people already living with HIV
Efforts to prevent new HIV transmissions in the US must be accompanied by addressing HIV-associated comorbidities to improve the health of people already living with HIV, NIH experts assert in the third of a series of JAMA commentaries. Previous commentaries detailed the proposed 'Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America,' which aims to reduce new HIV transmissions in the US, and discussed the challenges posed by the emerging opioid injection epidemic in rural areas. (2019-12-11)

Proton-hydrogen collision model could impact fusion research
A new study published in EPJ D uses new techniques to calculate the cross sections of atoms which have been excited to higher energy levels. They analysed the behaviour over a wide range of impact energies. (2019-12-09)

Ending HIV will require optimizing treatment and prevention tools, say NIH experts
Optimal implementation of existing HIV prevention and treatment tools and continued development of new interventions are essential to ending the HIV pandemic, National Institutes of Health experts write in a commentary in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-10-24)

World record acceleration: Zero to 7.8 billion electron volts in 8 inches
To understand the fundamental nature of our universe, scientists would like to build particle colliders that accelerate electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) to extreme energies (up to tera electron volts, or TeV). With conventional technology, however, this requires a machine that is enormously big and expensive (think 20 miles long). To shrink the size and cost of these machines, the acceleration of the particles -- how much energy they gain in a given distance -- must be increased. (2019-10-21)

UMass Amherst climate scientist contributes to IPCC session
This week, representatives of 195 member governments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are meeting in Monaco with dozens of climate scientists who have prepared a draft 'Summary for Policymakers' of their 'Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).' UMass Amherst climate scientist Robert DeConto, one of the lead authors and contributor to the report, is there in the working plenary session and will be available for reporters and media to discuss findings after it is final. (2019-09-24)

NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. Globally, more than one million new STI cases are diagnosed each day. In a new article in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, suggest that the biomedical research community must refocus its commitment to STI research to surmount this growing global health crisis. (2019-09-09)

Understanding the animal brain could help robots wash your dishes
CSHL neuroscientist Anthony Zador shows how evolution and animal brains can be a rich source of inspiration for machine learning, especially to help AI tackle some enormously difficult problems, like doing the dishes. (2019-08-21)

Reversing t cells' misunderstood rep in responding to a pediatric leukemia
A study of pediatric patients with leukemia demonstrates that they were able to generate T cells against tumor-associated mutations, contradicting previous assumptions that T cells cannot be effectively unleashed on pediatric tumors. (2019-06-26)

Artificial muscles powered by glucose
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules in their surroundings. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have presented their results in the journal Advanced Materials. (2019-06-19)

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