Current Antibiotics News and Events

Current Antibiotics News and Events, Antibiotics News Articles.
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Biological therapy has proved a suitable alternative to antibiotics
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a biological substitute for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in the future could serve as an alternative for the traditional ''chemical'' antibiotic therapy. Dr. Freund: ''Advances in molecular medicine enable us to develop new tools to rout microbes, which can also solve the problem of drug-resistant germs''. This groundbreaking study has been published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-02-22)

Advanced imaging technology captures translation of the maternal genome
An international collaboration among researchers from Finland, Sweden, UK and the USA has captured ribosomes translating messenger RNA expressed from the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome. Utilising the latest advances in cryo-electron microscopy, the group discovered a novel mechanism that mitochondrial ribosomes use for the synthesis and delivery of newly made proteins to prevent premature misfolding. Disruptions to protein folding can lead to devastating human diseases. (2021-02-22)

Antibiotic tolerance study paves way for new treatments
The study in mice, 'A Multifaceted Cellular Damage Repair and Prevention Pathway Promotes High Level Tolerance to Beta-lactam Antibiotics,' published Feb. 3 in the journal EMBO Reports, reveals how tolerance occurs, thanks to a system that mitigates iron toxicity in bacteria that have been exposed to penicillin. (2021-02-22)

Older adults and antibiotics: Study shows healthy attitudes but unhealthy practices
While most adults over 50 understand that overuse of antibiotics is a problem, and say they're cautious about taking the drugs, a sizable minority have used antibiotics for something other than their original purpose, and appear to think the drugs could help treat colds, which are caused by viruses not bacteria. (2021-02-18)

Metabolic mutations help bacteria resist drug treatment
MIT researchers have identified a new class of mutations that help bacteria develop antibiotic resistance. In a study of E. coli, they discovered that mutations to genes involved in metabolism can help bacteria to evade the toxic effects of several different antibiotics. (2021-02-18)

Antibiotic could be repurposed and added to tuberculosis treatment arsenal
Research has found fidaxomicin, an antibiotic usually used to treat bowel infections, prevents growth of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in the lab. (2021-02-17)

Low-value health care drops only marginally despite effort to curb practices
An estimated 10% to 20% of health care spending consists of low-value care -- patient services that offer no net clinical benefit in specific scenarios. A new study finds that spending on low-value health care among fee-for-service Medicare recipients dropped only marginally from 2014 to 2018, despite both a national campaign to better educate clinicians and increasing use of payment revisions that discourage wasteful care. (2021-02-16)

Hospital wastewater favors multi-resistant bacteria
Scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden presents evidence that hospital wastewater, containing elevated levels of antibiotics, rapidly kills antibiotic-sensitive bacteria, while multi-resistant bacteria continue to grow. Hospital sewers may therefore provide conditions that promote the evolution of new forms of antibiotic resistance. (2021-02-16)

Pooping out miracles: scientists reveal mechanism behind fecal microbiota transplantation
In a study published in Gastroenterology - Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, report the intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of patients with recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI). This comprehensive analysis reveals the bacteria and phages involved in pathogenesis in rCDI, and their remarkable pathways important for the recovery of intestinal flora function. (2021-02-10)

RUDN University veterinarians tested a new drug against pneumonia in calves
Respiratory tract diseases in young animals of the cattle are a big issue for world agriculture and food safety because a bacterium that causes them is resistant to most antibiotics. A team of veterinarians from RUDN University developed and tested a complex preparation called gentaminoseleferon that could help treat respiratory infection in calves. (2021-02-10)

New weapon against resistant bacteria
Researchers have developed a new antibiotic that can help in the fight against resistant bacteria, and they hope it will reach the patients. (2021-02-10)

Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journal Science of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (2021-02-10)

Study: 'Hidden' genes could be key in development of new antibiotics
A study from the Center for Phage Technology, part of Texas A&M's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Texas A&M AgriLife Research, shows how the ''hidden'' genes in bacteriophages -- types of viruses that infect and destroy bacteria -- may be key to the development of a new class of antibiotics for human health. (2021-02-05)

Soil bacteria hormone discovery provides fertile ground for new antibiotics
The discovery of how hormone-like molecules turn on antibiotic production in soil bacteria could unlock the untapped opportunities for medicines that are under our very feet. An international team of scientists working at the University of Warwick, UK, and Monash University, Australia, have determined the molecular basis of a biological mechanism that could enable more efficient and cost-effective production of existing antibiotics, and also allow scientists to uncover new antibiotics in soil bacteria. (2021-02-03)

CDDEP's report 'The State of the World's Antibiotics' highlights the growing threat of AMR
Researchers at CDDEP have released, The State of the World's Antibiotics in 2021, which presents extensive data on global antimicrobial use and resistance as well as drivers and correlates of antimicrobial resistance, based on CDDEP's extensive research and data collection through ResistanceMap (www.resistancemap.org), a global repository that has been widely used by researchers, policymakers, and the media. (2021-02-03)

Toxin-antitoxin function fuels antibiotic-resistance research
Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are now known to negatively control plasmid replication, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. (2021-02-01)

By changing their shape, some bacteria can grow more resilient to antibiotics
New research led by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Shiladitya Banerjee demonstrates how certain types of bacteria can adapt to long-term exposure to antibiotics by changing their shape. (2021-01-29)

Livestock workers face high MRSA risk
For Michigan State University's Felicia Wu, the surprise isn't that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are. (2021-01-28)

Detecting trace amounts of multiple classes of antibiotics in foods
Widespread use of antibiotics in human healthcare and livestock husbandry has led to trace amounts of the drugs ending up in food products. Long-term consumption could cause health problems, but it's been difficult to analyze more than a few antibiotics at a time because they have different chemical properties. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have developed a method to simultaneously measure 77 antibiotics in a variety of foods. (2021-01-27)

Why people overuse antibiotics
The overuse of antibiotics occurs due to the mistaken widespread belief that they are beneficial for a broad array of conditions and because many physicians are willing to prescribe antibiotics if patients ask for the medication, according to a Rutgers study. (2021-01-27)

Neonatal antibiotic use associated with reduced growth in boys
Exposure to antibiotics in the first few weeks of life is associated with reduced weight and height in boys up to the age of six, but not girls, reports a paper in Nature Communications. The study, led by Prof. Omry Koren, of Bar-Ilan University, together with Prof. Samuli Rautava, of the University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, suggests that this effect may be due to changes in the development of the gut microbiome. (2021-01-26)

Antibiotic resistance may spread even more easily than expected
Pathogenic bacteria in humans are developing resistance to antibiotics much faster than expected. Now, computational research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that one reason could be significant genetic transfer between bacteria in our ecosystems and to humans. This work has also led to new tools for resistance researchers. (2021-01-21)

Antibiotics combinations used regularly worldwide--but 80% of these not recommended by WHO
Fixed dose combinations of antibiotics are consumed in huge quantities globally, but 80 percent of combinations are not on the WHO Essential Medicines List, and 92 percent are not FDA-approved, - with inappropriate combinations risking inefficacy, toxicity, and selection for antimicrobial resistance. (2021-01-20)

Message in a bottle: Info-rich bubbles respond to antibiotics
In a new study, Luis H. Cisneros and his colleagues describe the effects of antibiotics on membrane vesicles, demonstrating that such drugs actively modify the properties of vesicle transport. Under the influence of antibiotics, MVs were produced and released by bacteria in greater abundance and traveled faster and further from their origin. The work sheds new light on these important information-carrying entities, implicated in many cellular communication processes, including antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-20)

Research establishes antibiotic potential for cannabis molecule
The main nonpsychoactive component of cannabis has been shown to kill the bacteria responsible for gonorrhoea, meningitis and legionnaires disease, which could lead to the first new class of antibiotics for resistant bacteria in 60 years. (2021-01-19)

Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs. (2021-01-19)

Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which the MCB form membrane vesicles. Further, their observations were consistent among various MCB. This study has implications for vaccine development as well as novel therapies. (2021-01-14)

Researchers show Irish soil can offer more hope in fight against antibiotic resistance
Scientists who highlighted the bug-busting properties of bacteria in Northern Irish soil have made another exciting discovery in the quest to discover new antibiotics. (2021-01-14)

Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The team reports on its findings in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2021-01-13)

Monash University leads breakthrough against antibiotic-resistance
New research published today has discovered how to revert antibiotic-resistance in one of the most dangerous superbugs. (2021-01-12)

Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics. (2021-01-12)

Antibiotic resistance from random DNA sequences
An important and still unanswered question is how new genes that cause antibiotic resistance arise. In a new study, Swedish and American researchers have shown how new genes that produce resistance can arise from completely random DNA sequences. The results have been published in the journal PLOS Genetics. (2021-01-08)

Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease. (2021-01-07)

Antibiotics not needed after most sinus surgeries: randomized controlled trial
Randomized controlled trial comparing antibiotics and placebo after routine endoscopic sinus surgery found no difference in outcomes including infection rates and symptoms. More gastrointestinal side effects were reported in patients taking antibiotics. (2021-01-06)

Resist the resistance: fighting the good fight against bacteria
Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathogen without damaging the good bacteria that bolsters the immune system. (2021-01-06)

New imaging method reveals if antibiotics reach bacteria hiding in tissues
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Western Australia have developed a new imaging method to see where antibiotics have reached bacteria within tissues. The method could be used to help develop more effective antibiotic treatments, reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-05)

Fluoride to the rescue?
Scientists have long been aware of the dangerous overuse of antibiotics and the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant microbes that have resulted. While over-prescription of antibiotics for medicinal use has unsettling implications for human health, so too does the increasing presence of antibiotics in the natural environment. The latter may stem from the improper disposal of medicines, but also from the biotechnology field, which has depended on antibiotics as a selection device in the lab. (2021-01-04)

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents. They are analogs of pesticides which are toxic and carcinogenic to humans, but the modifications allowed turning them into a powerful weapon against bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. (2020-12-29)

Wistar reports new class of antibiotics active against a wide range of bacteria
Wistar Institute scientists have discovered a new class of compounds that uniquely combine direct antibiotic killing of pan drug-resistant bacterial pathogens with a simultaneous rapid immune response for combatting antimicrobial resistance (AMR). These finding were published today in Nature. (2020-12-23)

With COVID exacerbating superbug threat, researchers ID new weapon
Researchers have discovered a compound capable of pushing through barriers used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist antibiotics, damaging the bugs and preventing them from spreading. (2020-12-23)

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