Current Antibodies News and Events

Current Antibodies News and Events, Antibodies News Articles.
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Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

New type of immunotherapy may pave the way for better cancer treatments
Immunotherapy for cancer has made great advances and many patients can now receive effective treatments that were not available ten years ago. However, there are certain types of cancer that do not respond to existing immunotherapy. A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports on a new kind of immunotherapy that gives hope of more treatment options for cancer in the future. (2020-11-23)

MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19
The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19. In a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers provide further proof of this by showing that mumps IgG titers, or levels of IgG antibody, are inversely correlated with severity in recovered COVID-19 patients previously vaccinated with the MMR II vaccine produced by Merck (2020-11-20)

Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 are detected up to 3 months after infection
The follow-up study in health care workers of the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona hopes to provide information on the duration of different antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 and their role in protecting from disease and reinfection (2020-11-20)

Altered 'coat' disguises fatal brain virus from neutralizing antibodies
A genetic modification in the 'coat' of a brain infection-causing virus may allow it to escape antibodies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say testing people for this and other viral mutations may help identify patients at risk for developing a fatal brain disease. (2020-11-20)

Study: TB vaccine linked to lower risk of contracting COVID-19
A widely used tuberculosis vaccine is associated with reduced likelihood of contracting COVID-19 (coronavirus), according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai. The findings raise the possibility that a vaccine already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may help prevent coronavirus infections or reduce severity of the disease. (2020-11-20)

Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19
Pairs of antibodies may be more effective than single antibodies at preventing and treating COVID-19, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Rockefeller University in New York. The study, published November 19, 2020 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that in addition to blocking SARS-CoV-2's entry into cells, the antibodies may combat the virus by enlisting various types of white blood cells to fight the infection. (2020-11-19)

Engineered immune cells elicit broad response to HIV in mice, offering hope for vaccine
Unlike so many other deadly viruses, HIV still lacks a vaccine. The virus has proven especially tricky to prevent with conventional antibodies, in part because it evolves so rapidly in the body. A solution would require coaxing the body into producing a special type of antibody that can act broadly to defeat multiple strains of the virus at once. Scientists at Scripps Research moved closer to attaining that goal with an approach that would rely on genetically engineered immune cells from the patient's body. (2020-11-19)

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera. Experiments showed that the antibodies block V. cholerae bacteria's motility. (2020-11-17)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

New saliva-based antibody test for SARS-CoV-2 highly accurate in initial study
A new saliva-based test developed by a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has been found to accurately detect the presence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Antibody evolution may predict COVID-19 outcomes
For COVID-19, the difference between surviving and not surviving severe disease may be due to the quality, not the quantity, of the patients' antibody development and response, suggests a new study. (2020-11-13)

Examining impact of a point mutation in SARS-Cov-2 spike on virus transmission and pathogenicity
The current dominant variant of SARS-CoV-2, containing a D614G substitution in the spike protein, appears to have evolved to enhance transmissibility, according to a new study in human cells and animal models. (2020-11-12)

Pre-existing coronavirus antibodies could help protect children against new pandemic strain
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and University College London have found that some antibodies, created by the immune system during infection with common cold coronaviruses, can also target SARS-CoV-2 and may confer a degree of protection against the new viral strain. (2020-11-06)

Preexisting antibodies targeting SARS-CoV-2 discovered in small proportion of uninfected individuals
Scientists have detected preexisting antibody-driven immunity against SARS-CoV-2 in a small proportion of individuals who were uninfected at the time of sampling. (2020-11-06)

Nanobodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2
Two separate studies have identified nanobodies - which could be produced less expensively than monoclonal antibodies - that bind tightly to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and efficiently neutralize SARS-CoV-2 in cells. (2020-11-05)

Stable protein decoy neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cells and protected hamsters from viral challenge
Researchers have designed a protein 'decoy' that mimics the interface where the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds a human cell, one version of which could neutralize virus infection in cells and protect hamsters from viral challenge. (2020-11-05)

Children produce different antibodies in response to SARS-CoV-2
Compared with adults, children produce a very different antibody response after infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, suggesting they clear the virus easily. (2020-11-05)

Scientists identify synthetic mini-antibody to combat COVID-19
By screening hundreds of synthetic mini-antibodies called sybodies, a group of scientists has identified one that might stop SARS-CoV-2 from infecting human cells. (2020-11-04)

Why protecting the brain against infection takes guts
The brain is uniquely protected against invading bacteria and viruses, but its defence mechanism has long remained a mystery. Now, a study in mice, confirmed in human samples, has shown that the brain has a surprising ally in its protection: the gut. (2020-11-04)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Researchers identify key marker to help speed development of CMV vaccines
A Duke Health-led research team has identified a key marker that will help speed effective vaccine designs for cytomegalovirus (CMV), the most common congenital infection worldwide and a leading cause of infant brain damage. (2020-11-04)

Fighting Zika? Call in the T cells
In a new Science Advances study, Shresta and her colleagues at LJI report that the immune system's T cells have the power to prevent Zika infection in mice. This finding suggests that effective Zika vaccines need to activate T cells to work alongside antibodies. (2020-11-04)

Earwax sampling could measure stress hormone
A novel method to sample earwax could be a cheap and effective way to measure the hormone cortisol, according to a study led by researchers at UCL and King's College London, published in the academic journal Heliyon. (2020-11-03)

Study uncovers subset of COVID-19 patients who recover quickly and sustain antibodies
Brigham investigators examined blood samples and cells from patients who had recovered from mild to moderate COVID-19 and found that while antibodies against the virus declined in most individuals after disease resolution, a subset of patients sustained anti-virus antibody production several months following infection. (2020-11-03)

Ultrapotent COVID-19 vaccine candidate designed via computer
An ultrapotent nanoparticle candidate vaccine against COVID-19 has been developed with structure-based vaccine design techniques invented at UW Medicine. It is a self-assembling protein nanoparticle that displays 60 copies of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein's receptor-binding domain in a highly immunogenic array. The molecular structure of the vaccine roughly mimics that of a virus, which may account for its enhanced ability to provoke an immune response. (2020-11-02)

New cause of COVID-19 blood clots identified
A new study reveals that COVID-19 triggers production of antibodies circulating through the blood, causing clots in people hospitalized with the disease. (2020-11-02)

Rapid method finds potent COVID-19 monoclonal antibody among a trillion possibilities
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists have discovered the fastest way to identify potent, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The method - as well as a trio of successful animal studies on an antibody called ''Ab1'' - are described today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Ab1 is on track for human clinical trials by early next year. (2020-11-02)

Unravelling the origins of autoimmune psychosis
Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an autoimmune brain illness that is often mistaken by a psychiatric disorder since it causes psychoses and other behaviour alterations. Despite having these similarities, the illness does not respond to common antipsychotic treatments. (2020-10-29)

How the immune system deals with the gut's plethora of microbes
New research suggests that our immune system may play an active role in shaping the digestive-tract flora, which is tightly linked to health and disease. (2020-10-29)

New study demonstrates importance of large-scale SARS-CoV-2 antibody
A new study lead by Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen indicates a six-fold higher SARS-CoV-2 exposure rate among children in Bavaria, Germany, than reported cases. This highlights the value of population-based antibody screenings for pandemic monitoring. The study also describes a novel approach to measuring antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 with high accuracy. (2020-10-29)

Study of COVID-19 levels in oncology staff suggests need for more extensive testing
A study of oncology staff carried out immediately after the spring peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK indicates that many had been infected with the coronavirus as they tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. This included staff who did not show any symptoms. (2020-10-29)

NEJM: clinical trial indicates monoclonal antibody lowered hospitalizations and emergency visits
COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients who were administered a novel antibody had fewer symptoms and were less likely to require hospitalization or emergency medical care than those who did not receive the antibody, according to a new study published in the The New England Journal of Medicine. (2020-10-29)

Turning a coronavirus protein into a nanoparticle could be key for COVID-19 vaccine
One of the proteins on the virus - located on the characteristic COVID spike - has a component called the receptor-binding domain, or RBD, which is its ''Achilles heel.'' That is, he said, antibodies against this part of the virus have the potential to the neutralize the virus. (2020-10-28)

Most people mount a strong antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 that does not decline rapidly
The vast majority of individuals infected with mild-to-moderate COVID 19 mount a robust antibody response that is relatively stable for at least five months, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 28, in the journal Science. (2020-10-28)

In study of 30,000 mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients, antibody responses can persist for five months
Researchers who studied antibody responses in 30,000 patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 report that the patients' antibodies were relatively stable for at least five months. (2020-10-28)

Antibody screening finds COVID-19 nearly 7 times more prevalent in O.C. than thought
Testing a representative sample of Orange County residents for a wide range of coronavirus antibodies, University of California, Irvine researchers found that 11.5 percent of them have antibodies for COVID-19, in contrast to previous estimates of less than 2 percent. (2020-10-28)

Cancer cells mediate immune suppression in the brain
Notre Dame researchers showed that one type of cell important for immunity, called a myeloid cell, can suppress the immune response -- which has the effect of allowing breast cancer cells to metastasize to the brain to form secondary tumor cells there. (2020-10-27)

Scientists map structure of potent antibody against coronavirus
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle have shown that a potent antibody from a COVID-19 survivor interferes with a key feature on the surface of the coronavirus's distinctive spikes and induces critical pieces of those spikes to break off in the process. Note: Video embedded. (2020-10-27)

Study shows how exercise stalls cancer growth through the immune system
People with cancer who exercise generally have a better prognosis than inactive patients. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a likely explanation of why exercise helps slow down cancer growth in mice: Physical activity changes the metabolism of the immune system's cytotoxic T cells and thereby improves their ability to attack cancer cells. The study is published in the journal eLife. (2020-10-26)

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