Current Antidepressant News and Events | Page 2

Current Antidepressant News and Events, Antidepressant News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 24 | 933 Results
Academics call for targeted healthcare for pregnant women and new mums with depression
Pregnant women and new mothers who experience depression need improved healthcare say academics. (2019-11-20)

Depressed MS-patients suffer debilitating symptoms earlier
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who also have depression are more likely to suffer debilitating symptoms early than people with MS who are not depressed, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is published in the journal Neurology. The findings highlight the need for early recognition and treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with MS. (2019-11-08)

Significantly fewer pregnant women take antidepressants
A pregnancy is not always a happy event and as many as 10-15% of pregnant women in Denmark have depressive symptoms. A new study carried out by Aarhus University now shows a significant decrease in the use of antidepressants by pregnant women -- with consumption falling by more than 33% since 2011. (2019-10-29)

Study: In the long run, drugs and talk therapy hold same value for people with depression
Spending an hour in talk therapy with a trained counselor costs much more, and takes more time, than swallowing an inexpensive antidepressant pill. But for people with a new diagnosis of major depression, the costs and benefits of the two approaches end up being equal after five years, a new study shows. (2019-10-28)

Anti-inflammatory agents can effectively and safely curb major depressive symptoms
Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin/paracetamol, statins, and antibiotics, can safely and effectively curb the symptoms of major depression, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2019-10-28)

Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars
The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia. Despite a rise in antidepressant use, there was little change in the number of older people diagnosed with depression. The findings are based on the Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies, conducted at two time points -- between 1991 and 1993, and between 2008 and 2011. (2019-10-06)

Long-term mental health benefits of gender-affirming surgery for transgender individuals
For transgender individuals, gender-affirming surgery can lead to long-term mental health benefits, according to new research published online today in The American Journal of Psychiatry. (2019-10-04)

Long-term study data shows DBS is effective treatment for most severe form of depression
A study published online on Friday, October 4, in The American Journal of Psychiatry found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of an area in the brain called the subcallosal cingulate (SCC) provides a robust antidepressant effect that is sustained over a long period of time in patients with treatment-resistant depression--the most severely depressed patients who have not responded to other treatments. (2019-10-04)

Grading evidence in studies about antidepressant use/exposure and adverse health outcomes
This study graded the evidence of 45 meta-analyses of observational studies on the association between antidepressant use or exposure and adverse health outcomes. (2019-10-02)

Antidepressant medications appear to be generally safe
Antidepressants are generally safe, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. By assessing evidence from 45 meta-analyses, which combined the results from many studies, the researchers did not find strong evidence of adverse health outcomes associated with antidepressant use. The findings have been published in JAMA Psychiatry. (2019-10-02)

Antidepressants linked to heightened pregnancy related diabetes risk
Taking antidepressants while expecting a baby is linked to a heightened risk of developing diabetes that is specifically related to pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-10-01)

Sleeping pills reduce suicidal thoughts in patients with severe insomnia
Insomnia is a driver of suicide, and particularly people with severe insomnia may safely benefit from taking a sedative to help address their sleep problems as it reduces their suicidal thoughts, investigators report. (2019-09-30)

AI helps scientists predict depression outcomes
Two studies led by UT Southwestern provide evidence for the impact of biology by using artificial intelligence to identify patterns of brain activity that make people less responsive to certain antidepressants. Put simply, scientists showed they can use imaging of a patient's brain to decide whether a medication is likely to be effective. (2019-09-25)

Why don't the drugs work? Controlling inflammation can make antidepressants more effective
Research shows that controlling inflammation may be key to helping the brain develop the flexibility to respond to antidepressant drugs, potentially opening the way for treatment for many millions of people who do not respond to the drugs. This is experimental work on mice, and has not yet been confirmed in humans. It is presented together for the first time at the ECNP Congress in Copenhagen, after a series of publications in peer-reviewed journals. (2019-09-09)

Scientists find psychiatric drugs affect gut contents
Scientists have found that antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs can change the quantity and composition of gut bacteria in rats. These results raise questions about the specificity of psychoactive drug action, and if confirmed in humans whether psychiatrists might need to consider the effects on the body before prescribing. The research team is currently carrying out a large-scale human observational study which aims to answer the questions posed by these findings. (2019-09-08)

Study shows how serotonin and a popular anti-depressant affect the gut's microbiota
A new UCLA-led biology study in mice strongly suggests that serotonin and drugs that target serotonin, such as anti-depressants, can have a major effect on the gut's microbiota -- the 100 trillion or so bacteria and other microbes that live in the human body's intestines. (2019-09-05)

Psychotherapy should be first-line treatment for depression in young people, trial finds
Young people seeking support for depression should be offered psychotherapy as the first line of treatment, a clinical trial by researchers at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, has found. (2019-07-31)

Ketamine isn't an opioid and treats depression in a unique way
Ketamine has gotten a bad rap as an opioid when there's plenty of evidence suggesting it isn't one, Johns Hopkins experts say. They believe this reputation may hamper patients from getting necessary treatment for the kinds of depression that don't respond to typical antidepressants. In a new paper, the researchers clarify the mechanism behind ketamine's mechanism of action in hopes of restoring the therapy's standing among health care professionals and the public. (2019-07-31)

Compound found in red wine opens door for new treatments for depression, anxiety
A new University at Buffalo-led study has revealed that the plant compound resveratrol, which is found in red wine, displays anti-stress effects by blocking the expression of an enzyme related to the control of stress in the brain. (2019-07-26)

Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work
When someone is depressed and having suicidal thoughts or their depression treatment just isn't working, their caregivers might want to check to see if they have obstructive sleep apnea, investigators say. (2019-07-23)

Antidepressants can reduce the empathic empathy
Depression is a disorder that often comes along with strong impairments of social functioning. Until recently, researchers assumed that acute episodes of depression also impair empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. Novel insights of an interdisciplinary from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna show that antidepressant treatment can lead to impaired empathy regarding perception of pain, and not just the state of depression itself. (2019-06-18)

Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression
For some people, medication is an effective part of treatment for depression. However, when considering whether to prescribe antidepressant medication for older adults, healthcare providers must weigh the safety risks these medications pose against the often modest benefits they can provide compared to other options. (2019-06-12)

When drug treatment for social anxiety is insufficient
A Japanese study group clarified that cognitive therapy maintained its effects more than a year after the end of therapy for patients with a social anxiety disorder even for those who did not respond to antidepressant drugs. (2019-05-28)

Discovery of hippocampal mossy cell involvement to maximize antidepressant effects
Professor Yong-Seok Oh's team at the DGIST Department of Brain-Cognitive Science clarified the expression of antidepressant efficacy by modulating hippocampal mossy cells. Expects to provide a basis to understand the mechanism of existing anti-depressants and contribute greatly to the development of next generation depression treatment. (2019-05-24)

Study supports effectiveness of new fast-acting antidepressant, esketamine nasal spray
New research supports the effectiveness and safety of esketamine nasal spray in treating depression in people who have not responded to previous treatment. The research will be published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry. This study is one of the key studies that led to the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of esketamine nasal spray, in conjunction with an oral antidepressant, for use in people with treatment-resistant depression. (2019-05-21)

Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s. (2019-05-08)

Newly discovered gene mutation reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oulu have discovered of a new type of gene mutation that reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction. The researchers employed gene manipulation technology to remove the P4h-tm gene from the mouse genome and found an unexpected change in mouse behaviour. P4h-tm knockout mice showed striking courage and a lack of learned helplessness compared to congenic wild-type mice with a functional P4h-tm gene. (2019-05-02)

Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy
An international team led by Duke-NUS Medical School has found a potential link between autistic-like behaviour in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study published in the journal Molecular Brain. (2019-04-30)

Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect. (2019-04-11)

Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. Ketamine treatment restored lost dendritic spines and rescued coordinated neural activity in the Prefrontal Cortex of the mice -- findings that may help researchers develop interventions that promote lasting remission of depression in humans. The study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-04-11)

Anti-inflammatory medicine can have a beneficial effect on depression
Research carried out by the national psychiatry project iPSYCH shows that arthritis medicine can have a beneficial effect on symptoms of depression. (2019-04-08)

Experimental drug shows promise for opioid withdrawal symptoms
While medicines are available to relieve withdrawal symptoms in people recovering from opioid addiction, they cause side effects and can maintain the brain changes that led to addiction in the first place, which can lead to relapse before treatment is completed. New research offers hope that a better solution may be on the horizon. Rapastinel, an experimental drug originally developed as an antidepressant, substantially reversed acute signs of opioid withdrawal in rats in just three days. (2019-04-07)

Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine
Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression. (2019-03-28)

Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. The study is the first of its kind to examine the connection between children diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed MPH between the ages of six and eight, and future dispensed prescriptions of antidepressants. (2019-03-27)

CAMH study reveals a new target for developing treatments for depression
A new CAMH study shows for the first time that people experiencing clinical depression have higher levels of a brain protein called MAO-B. The finding -- published online today in JAMA Psychiatry -- opens the door to a new area of exploration for developing depression treatments. Depression affects an estimated 15 per cent of people over their lifetime, and is the leading cause of disability worldwide. (2019-03-06)

Integrated therapy treating obesity and depression is effective
An intervention combining behavioral weight loss treatment and problem-solving therapy with as-needed antidepressant medication for participants with co-occurring obesity and depression improved weight loss and depressive symptoms compared with routine physician care, according to an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2019-03-05)

Psychedelic microdosing in rats shows beneficial effects
Microdosing -- taking tiny amounts of psychedelic drugs to boost mood and mental acuity -- is based on anecdotal reports of its benefits. Now, a study in rats by researchers at UC Davis suggests microdosing can provide relief for symptoms of depression and anxiety, but also has potential negative effects.  (2019-03-04)

For patients with schizophrenia, some drug combinations may be more effective than others
Patients with schizophrenia are often treated with more than one type of psychiatric medication, but a new study suggests that some combinations may be more effective than others. (2019-02-20)

Antidepressant could stop deadly sepsis, study suggests
An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research suggests. (2019-02-14)

Study finds no association between trazodone and reduced dementia risk
In a large UK population-based study, Ian Wong and colleagues at the University of Hong Kong and University College London, UK, found no statistically significant association between the antidepressant trazodone and a reduced risk of dementia when compared to other antidepressants. Their findings were published this week in PLOS Medicine. (2019-02-05)

Page 2 of 24 | 933 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.