Current Antidepressants News and Events

Current Antidepressants News and Events, Antidepressants News Articles.
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Researchers uncover new information on the effects of antidepressants
The findings of a new study challenge the prevailing thinking on the primary role of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in the effects of antidepressants. (2021-02-18)

Which suicide prevention strategies work?
Columbia University researchers have found that suicide deaths can be reduced by a Federally coordinated approach employing scientifically proven options. (2021-02-18)

Model predicts likelihood of persistent high-dose opioid use after knee surgery
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified 10 readily available clinical factors that may predict which patients will persistently use high doses of opioids in the year following knee replacement surgery. (2021-02-03)

Genetic screening before prescribing could benefit millions
New research finds that millions of UK patients could benefit from genetic screening (cheek swab) before being prescribed common medications including antidepressants, stomach ulcer treatments and painkillers. More than 95 per cent of the population carry a genetic marker that predicts an atypical response to at least one medicine. The study looked at nine of these genetic markers, affecting 56 medicines where there are known drug-gene interactions. (2021-01-29)

Street trees close to the home may reduce the risk of depression
Daily contact with trees in the street may reduce the need for antidepressants. This is the result of a study by researchers at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Leipzig University, recently published in Scientific Reports. Street tree planting in cities may be a nature-based solution in urban planning to reduce the risk of depression, also addressing climate change and biodiversity loss. (2021-01-25)

Do antidepressants help chronic back pain and osteoarthritis?
Antidepressants are commonly used worldwide to treat pain, however new research from the University of Sydney shows they offer little to no help for people suffering chronic back pain and osteoarthritis and may even cause harm. (2021-01-20)

Antidepressants largely ineffective for back pain and osteoarthritis
Antidepressant drugs are largely ineffective for back and osteoarthritis pain, despite being widely used for these conditions, suggests a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-20)

World's first test to accurately predict depression and bipolar disorder
University of South Australia scientists have developed the world's first test to accurately predict mood disorders in people, based on the levels of a specific protein found in the brain. (2021-01-18)

Scientists seek faster route to treat depression
The Brazilian research group used epigenetic modulators to try to 'erase' the damage done by stress to neuroplasticity. The study showed that acute intervention in epigenetic mechanisms produces antidepressant-like effects more rapidly than conventional drugs. (2021-01-04)

New use for an old drug: How does ketamine combat depression?
A group of proteins called 4E-BPs, involved in memory formation, is the key to unlocking the antidepressant effect of ketamine in the brain, according to researchers from three Canadian universities. The discovery could lead to better and safer treatments for certain patients suffering from major depression. (2020-12-16)

Rewiring stroke survivors brains could alleviate depression
University of South Australia researchers have made a major breakthrough in the treatment of depression after stroke, using a high frequency brain stimulation device to improve low moods. (2020-12-11)

Prescriptions of antipsychotic medications in young children is declining
The use of antipsychotics in young children is declining but doctors continue to prescribe these medications off-label for conditions not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and without the recommended psychiatric consultation, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-09)

Water fleas on 'happy pills' have more offspring
Dopamine can trigger feelings of happiness in humans. Water fleas that are exposed to dopamine-regulating substances apparently gain several advantages. (2020-10-29)

Higher suicide risk among older immigrants with untreated depression
The risk of suicide is clearly elevated in the category of older women with untreated depression who were born outside the Nordic region, compared with corresponding Swedish-born women. This is shown by a study from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2020-10-08)

Suicide deaths among youth following antidepressant boxed warnings
A public health advisory issued by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2003, followed by drug label warnings, indicated that children and adolescents taking antidepressants were at increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Research has shown that these warnings reduced the diagnosis and treatment of depression among young people. Now, a new study suggests that the warnings may also have contributed to an increase in suicide deaths among youth. (2020-10-07)

A putative mechanism that switches brain pathology from anxiety to depression discovered
In experiments on mice, putative mechanisms for switching brain pathology from a state of experimental anxiety to depression have been discovered by the international team of researchers led by scientists from St Petersburg University (Russia). In the long term, this discovery could make it possible to create new, more effective drugs for mental disorders in humans. (2020-10-02)

New clues about the link between stress and depression
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety. (2020-10-02)

Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality
Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant. (2020-09-30)

Measuring brainwaves while sleeping can tell if you should switch antidepressants
Scientists have discovered that measuring brainwaves produced during REM sleep can predict whether a patient will respond to treatment from depression. This enables patients to switch to a new treatment rather than continue the ineffective treatment (and the depression) for weeks without knowing the outcome. (2020-09-12)

Site of male sexual desire uncovered in brain
The locus of male sexual desire has been uncovered in specific regions of brain tissue where a key gene named aromatase is present, reports a new study in mice. The gene regulates sexual behavior in men, and thus can be targeted by drugs to either increase its function for low sexual desire or decrease its function for compulsive sexual desire, scientists said. Aromatase converts testosterone to estrogen in the brain, which drives male sexual activity. (2020-09-11)

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes
For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective ''early warning'' of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. (2020-09-11)

'One size fits all' medication approach doesn't work in pregnancy
New research led by the University of South Australia shows that a blanket approach to prescribing medication during pregnancy may put low birth weight babies at risk for the rest of their lives. (2020-09-08)

Relatives in deep grief can be helped earlier
Many relatives who experience severe long-term grief reactions after bereavement have more frequent contact with their general practitioner already prior to bereavement, as well as a higher consumption of antidepressants and sedatives than those who have fewer critical symptoms of grief over time. This suggests that it may be possible to prevent this by catching this group earlier. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus University. (2020-09-01)

Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?
Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are impaired in people with depression. (2020-08-24)

These drugs carry risks and may not help, but many dementia patients get them anyway
Nearly three-quarters of older adults with dementia have filled prescriptions for medicines that act on their brain and nervous system, but aren't designed for dementia, a new study shows. That's despite the special risks that such drugs carry for older adults -- and the lack of evidence that they actually ease the dementia-related behavior problems that often prompt a doctor's prescription in patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. (2020-08-18)

Trajectories of antidepressant medication use during pregnancy
In an analysis of women who started pregnancy when taking antidepressant medications, investigators identified three trajectories of antidepressant dispensing during pregnancy: more than half stopped their treatment, a quarter maintained their treatment throughout pregnancy, and one-fifth discontinued it for a minimum of three months and then resumed it during the postpartum period. (2020-08-05)

How much postmenopause weight gain can be blamed on weight-promoting medications?
Abdominal weight gain, which is common during the postmenopause period, is associated with an array of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease. A new study suggests that the use of antidepressants, beta-blockers, and insulin during the menopause transition is partially to blame for such unhealthy weight gain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-07-15)

McLean hospital study examines the cost-effectiveness of esketamine
A paper authored by researchers from McLean Hospital has determined that esketamine, a nasal spray to treat severe depression, is currently too expensive for widespread use. (2020-07-13)

Adult stem cell study shows fish oil may help with depression
A study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that patient-derived adult stem cells can be used to model major depressive disorder and test how a patient may respond to medication and that fish oil, when tested in the model, created an antidepressant response. (2020-06-11)

The impact of disclosure laws on prescription patterns from companies that pay them
It's not uncommon for U.S. pharmaceutical companies to pay medical doctors to promote their medications. Questions over possible conflicts of interest have led to introduction of laws that require payment disclosure so that the public can see which pharmaceutical companies are paying which doctors. (2020-06-08)

Study shows opioid, sedative and antidepressant use pre-surgery leads to worse outcomes
A study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers showed that patients who already used opioids, sedatives or antidepressants prior to colorectal surgery experience significantly more complications post-surgery. (2020-06-08)

Researchers call for new approach to some mental disorders
Depression, anxiety and PTSD might not be disorders at all, according to a recent paper by Washington State University biological anthropologists. In the paper, the researchers propose a new approach to mental illness that would be informed by human evolution, noting that modern psychology, and in particular its use of drugs like antidepressants, has largely failed to reduce the prevalence of mental disorders. (2020-05-26)

A sound treatment
University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Jan Kubanek has discovered that sound waves of high frequency (ultrasound) can be emitted into a patient's brain to alter his or her state. It's a non-invasive treatment that doesn't involve medications or surgery and has a unique potential to treat mental disorders including depression and anxiety and neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy. (2020-05-20)

New review of studies shows no link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism
A mother's use of antidepressants during pregnancy does not appear to increase her child's risk for autism, according to a new meta-analysis by Jeffrey Newport, M.D., published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-05-07)

Large differences in personality traits between patients with social anxiety disorder
Individuals with social anxiety disorder have markedly different personality traits than others. Emotional instability and introversion are hallmarks, according to a new study from Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE. (2020-04-29)

A biological mechanism for depression
Researchers report that in depressed individuals there are increased amounts of an unmodified structural protein, called tubulin, in lipid rafts compared with non-depressed individuals. (2020-04-21)

Depression in adults who are overweight or obese
In an analysis of primary care records of 519,513 UK adults who were overweight or obese between 2000-2016 and followed up until 2019, the incidence of new cases of depression was 92 per 10,000 people per year. The risk of depression also rose with higher weight, according to the Obesity analysis. (2020-04-08)

Promising advance in depression research
Despite their effectiveness, only 40% of patients respond to the first antidepressant they try. A recent paper in Nature Communication strongly suggests that a particular protein, GPR56, is involved in the biology of depression and the effect of antidepressants. The McGill led research team believe that this protein could offer a novel target for new antidepressant drugs. (2020-04-08)

Study: Therapy by phone is effective for depression in people with Parkinson's
Depression is common in people with Parkinson's disease and contributes to faster physical and mental decline, but it is often overlooked and undertreated. The good news is that participating in cognitive-behavioral therapy by telephone may be effective in reducing depression symptoms for people with Parkinson's, according to a study published in the April 1, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-04-01)

New drug can ease the side effects of medication against severe depression
Today, severe depressions require a high dose of antidepressants. However, the high dose may also cause serious side effects. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found a substance that may ease the side effects while preserving the therapeutic effect. (2020-03-20)

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