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Current Antidepressants News and Events, Antidepressants News Articles.
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Researchers say extended antidepressant use creates physical dependence
Researchers explain symptoms associated with Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome and provide a schedule for tapering various classes of antidepressants. Patients who stop medication without tapering often experience flulike symptoms, insomnia, nausea, imbalance, sensory disturbances often described as electric shocks or 'brain zaps', and hyperarousal. (2020-02-20)

Doctors urged to recognize post-antidepressant sexual dysfunction
A psychiatrist specializing in sexual dysfunction caused by antidepressants is calling for greater recognition of the problems that can endure after treatment stops. Professor David Healy, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, said problems may begin after only a few doses and leave someone affected for life, or a relatively mild dysfunction can worsen dramatically when the person stops treatment. (2020-01-23)

Treatment for depression must also restore proper functioning of the blood-brain barrier
To better treat people with depression, not only must we treat the neurons affected by the disease, but we must also restore the integrity of the barrier that regulates exchanges between blood circulation and the brain. This is the conclusion of a study published today in PNAS by Université Laval researchers and their international collaborators. (2020-01-21)

Are some antidepressants less risky for pregnant women?
About one in ten women in Québec will suffer from depression during pregnancy. Without treatment, the illness carries risks for both mother and child. Yet antidepressants are not without consequences for fetal development. The team of professor Cathy Vaillancourt at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) is studying the effects of these drugs in order to identify the least harmful ones. (2020-01-08)

The effect of taking antidepressants during pregnancy
Exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy and the first weeks of life can alter sensory processing well into adulthood, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro. (2019-12-16)

'Safety signals' may help slow down anxiety
For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Researchers at Yale University and Weill Cornell Medicine report on a novel way that could help combat such anxiety. In humans and in mice, a 'safety signal' -- a symbol or a sound that is never associated with adverse events -- can relieve anxiety through an entirely different brain network than that activated by existing behavioral therapy. (2019-12-09)

People with depression experience suicidal thoughts despite treatment
One in five people with depression have suicidal thoughts despite treatment with antidepressants. This is shown by a new study from iPSYCH. The results can be used to examine whether more targeted treatment could be provided for patients where medication does not have a sufficient effect. (2019-11-28)

Academics call for targeted healthcare for pregnant women and new mums with depression
Pregnant women and new mothers who experience depression need improved healthcare say academics. (2019-11-20)

FSU research: Ketamine could help men suffering from alcohol use disorder
Research from Florida State University is giving physicians a better understanding of ketamine, a potentially useful tool in treating depression that still has unanswered questions. A team of researchers working in the laboratory of Mohamed Kabbaj, a professor of Biomedical Sciences and Neuroscience in the College of Medicine, showed that ketamine can decrease alcohol consumption in male rats that previously had consumed high amounts of alcohol when given unrestricted access several times a week. (2019-11-19)

Significantly fewer pregnant women take antidepressants
A pregnancy is not always a happy event and as many as 10-15% of pregnant women in Denmark have depressive symptoms. A new study carried out by Aarhus University now shows a significant decrease in the use of antidepressants by pregnant women -- with consumption falling by more than 33% since 2011. (2019-10-29)

Study: In the long run, drugs and talk therapy hold same value for people with depression
Spending an hour in talk therapy with a trained counselor costs much more, and takes more time, than swallowing an inexpensive antidepressant pill. But for people with a new diagnosis of major depression, the costs and benefits of the two approaches end up being equal after five years, a new study shows. (2019-10-28)

Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars
The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia. Despite a rise in antidepressant use, there was little change in the number of older people diagnosed with depression. The findings are based on the Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies, conducted at two time points -- between 1991 and 1993, and between 2008 and 2011. (2019-10-06)

Long-term mental health benefits of gender-affirming surgery for transgender individuals
For transgender individuals, gender-affirming surgery can lead to long-term mental health benefits, according to new research published online today in The American Journal of Psychiatry. (2019-10-04)

Antidepressant medications appear to be generally safe
Antidepressants are generally safe, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. By assessing evidence from 45 meta-analyses, which combined the results from many studies, the researchers did not find strong evidence of adverse health outcomes associated with antidepressant use. The findings have been published in JAMA Psychiatry. (2019-10-02)

Antidepressants linked to heightened pregnancy related diabetes risk
Taking antidepressants while expecting a baby is linked to a heightened risk of developing diabetes that is specifically related to pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-10-01)

AI helps scientists predict depression outcomes
Two studies led by UT Southwestern provide evidence for the impact of biology by using artificial intelligence to identify patterns of brain activity that make people less responsive to certain antidepressants. Put simply, scientists showed they can use imaging of a patient's brain to decide whether a medication is likely to be effective. (2019-09-25)

Why don't the drugs work? Controlling inflammation can make antidepressants more effective
Research shows that controlling inflammation may be key to helping the brain develop the flexibility to respond to antidepressant drugs, potentially opening the way for treatment for many millions of people who do not respond to the drugs. This is experimental work on mice, and has not yet been confirmed in humans. It is presented together for the first time at the ECNP Congress in Copenhagen, after a series of publications in peer-reviewed journals. (2019-09-09)

Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher. (2019-09-09)

Scientists find psychiatric drugs affect gut contents
Scientists have found that antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs can change the quantity and composition of gut bacteria in rats. These results raise questions about the specificity of psychoactive drug action, and if confirmed in humans whether psychiatrists might need to consider the effects on the body before prescribing. The research team is currently carrying out a large-scale human observational study which aims to answer the questions posed by these findings. (2019-09-08)

Psychotherapy should be first-line treatment for depression in young people, trial finds
Young people seeking support for depression should be offered psychotherapy as the first line of treatment, a clinical trial by researchers at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, has found. (2019-07-31)

Ketamine isn't an opioid and treats depression in a unique way
Ketamine has gotten a bad rap as an opioid when there's plenty of evidence suggesting it isn't one, Johns Hopkins experts say. They believe this reputation may hamper patients from getting necessary treatment for the kinds of depression that don't respond to typical antidepressants. In a new paper, the researchers clarify the mechanism behind ketamine's mechanism of action in hopes of restoring the therapy's standing among health care professionals and the public. (2019-07-31)

Compound found in red wine opens door for new treatments for depression, anxiety
A new University at Buffalo-led study has revealed that the plant compound resveratrol, which is found in red wine, displays anti-stress effects by blocking the expression of an enzyme related to the control of stress in the brain. (2019-07-26)

Antidepressants reduce deaths by more than a third in patients with diabetes
Antidepressants reduce deaths by more than a third in patients with diabetes and depression, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2019-07-02)

Common antidepressants interact with opioid med to lessen pain relief
Common antidepressants interact with the opioid pain medication tramadol to make it less effective for pain relief, according to a study published in the journal Pharmacotherapy. These findings have important implications for the opioid epidemic, suggesting that some patients suspected of drug-seeking may in fact be under-medicated and just are seeking more effective pain relief. They also could help explain why some people exceed the prescribed dose of tramadol, increasing their risk of addiction. (2019-06-25)

Commonly prescribed drugs could increase the risk of dementia, says a new study
New research suggests that regular use of certain types of commonly prescribed drugs used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson's disease and depression, could significantly increase the risk of dementia in later life. (2019-06-24)

Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression
For some people, medication is an effective part of treatment for depression. However, when considering whether to prescribe antidepressant medication for older adults, healthcare providers must weigh the safety risks these medications pose against the often modest benefits they can provide compared to other options. (2019-06-12)

When drug treatment for social anxiety is insufficient
A Japanese study group clarified that cognitive therapy maintained its effects more than a year after the end of therapy for patients with a social anxiety disorder even for those who did not respond to antidepressant drugs. (2019-05-28)

New therapeutic target for depression identified
There are different pharmacological treatments for depression, mainly therapies that act on the serotonin system -- the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). However, it has been evidenced that these antidepressants take around two weeks to have an effect and, what's more, around 30% of patients are resistant to this drug. Researchers of the Department of Human Physiology of the UMA Faculty of Medicine have taken a step closer to a new therapeutic target to face this mental disorder. (2019-05-22)

Study supports effectiveness of new fast-acting antidepressant, esketamine nasal spray
New research supports the effectiveness and safety of esketamine nasal spray in treating depression in people who have not responded to previous treatment. The research will be published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry. This study is one of the key studies that led to the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of esketamine nasal spray, in conjunction with an oral antidepressant, for use in people with treatment-resistant depression. (2019-05-21)

Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS
The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a Sahlgrenska Academy study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from the brain to the gut. (2019-05-15)

Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy
An international team led by Duke-NUS Medical School has found a potential link between autistic-like behaviour in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study published in the journal Molecular Brain. (2019-04-30)

Treating addiction: Cryo-EM technology enables the 'impossible'
Scientists used a compound found in a shrub native to Africa to reveal the three major shapes of the serotonin transporter, a protein in the brain linked to anxiety and depression. The discovery opens new avenues for developing medications to treat addiction. (2019-04-24)

Study identifies gender differences in reported adverse drug reactions
In a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study, investigators uncovered numerous gender differences in reports of adverse drug reactions sent to the National Pharmacovigilance Centre in the Netherlands. (2019-04-03)

Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine
Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression. (2019-03-28)

Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. The study is the first of its kind to examine the connection between children diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed MPH between the ages of six and eight, and future dispensed prescriptions of antidepressants. (2019-03-27)

CAMH study reveals a new target for developing treatments for depression
A new CAMH study shows for the first time that people experiencing clinical depression have higher levels of a brain protein called MAO-B. The finding -- published online today in JAMA Psychiatry -- opens the door to a new area of exploration for developing depression treatments. Depression affects an estimated 15 per cent of people over their lifetime, and is the leading cause of disability worldwide. (2019-03-06)

Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents
Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research by University of Sydney and the NSW Poisons Information Centre. The study found there were more than 33,500 self-poisonings in young people in Australia from 2006 - 2016, with a 98 per cent increase over this time. (2019-02-20)

For patients with schizophrenia, some drug combinations may be more effective than others
Patients with schizophrenia are often treated with more than one type of psychiatric medication, but a new study suggests that some combinations may be more effective than others. (2019-02-20)

Study finds no association between trazodone and reduced dementia risk
In a large UK population-based study, Ian Wong and colleagues at the University of Hong Kong and University College London, UK, found no statistically significant association between the antidepressant trazodone and a reduced risk of dementia when compared to other antidepressants. Their findings were published this week in PLOS Medicine. (2019-02-05)

New UC study may help guide treatment of pediatric anxiety
Researchers from the University of Cincinnati looked at common medications prescribed for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, to determine the most effective and best-tolerated. This study revealed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) performed best overall. The results, available online in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, include the largest amount of data to date for analyses of pediatric anxiety disorder treatments. (2019-02-01)

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