Current Aphids News and Events

Current Aphids News and Events, Aphids News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 6 | 223 Results
Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

Aphids suck: Invasive aphid found on Danish apple trees
The spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola, an invasive pest, has been discovered for the first time in Denmark by University of Copenhagen researchers. The extent of its current distribution remains unknown, but in time, it could prove to be a troublesome pest for Danish apple growers. (2021-01-19)

Invasive harlequin ladybird causes severe decline of two-spotted ladybird, new study shows
CABI scientists have led an 11-year study which shows how the invasive harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) caused the severe decline of the two-spotted ladybird on broadleaved trees and shrubs in northern Switzerland. Lead author Dr Marc Kenis, Head of Risk Analysis and Invasion Ecology based at CABI's Swiss Centre in Delémont, of the research said the two-spotted ladybird was the most abundant ladybird at the 40 sites surveyed before the harlequin ladybird took hold between 2006 and 2017. (2020-12-14)

Plant viruses hijack the defence system of plants, but there might be a way to strike back
Recently discovered interactions between plant and viral proteins open up new avenues for making plants resistant to viruses, thus safeguarding crop yields in changing climate conditions. (2020-11-03)

Shifts in flowering phases of plants due to reduced insect density
A research group of the University of Jena and the iDiv has discovered that insects have a decisive influence on the biodiversity and flowering phases of plants. If there is a lack of insects where the plants are growing, their flowering behaviour changes. This can result in the lifecycles of the insects and the flowering periods of the plants no longer coinciding. If the insects seek nectar, some plants will no longer be pollinated. (2020-10-26)

In pursuit of alternative pesticides
Controlling crop pests is a key element of agriculture worldwide, but the environmental impact of insecticides is a growing concern. Farmers have historically relied on the broad-spectrum chlorpyrifos, which is facing a potential ban in the U.S. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how scientists are working to develop safer alternatives to chlorpyrifos. (2020-10-21)

Surplus sugar helps whiteflies detoxify plant defenses
When attacking crucifers, the sap-sucking whitefly Bemisia tabaci can activate the chemical defenses of these plants. In a new study, an international team of researchers demonstrated that the pest is able to render a large proportion of the plant toxins harmless by binding surplus sugar to them. The whitefly thus deploys a completely new and until now undescribed detoxification mechanism to defuse the plants' defenses, which could explain the success of this major agricultural pest. (2020-09-28)

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus, QUT study
Modelling the predicted movements of pervasive sap-sucking tiny insects before they infest banana crops has the potential to become a key tactic in the fight against a devastating virus, according to QUT research. Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913. QUT researchers have designed a model that tracked the probability of a banana plant being infected by aphids that carried the disease, with the findings published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-08-10)

Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides. (2020-06-16)

Harnessing psyllid peptides to fight citrus greening disease
BTI, USDA and UW scientists have identified peptides in the Asian citrus psyllid, an insect that spreads the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB). The researchers are using the peptides as starting points for developing an insecticide to halt damage to the U.S.'s multi-billion dollar citrus industry. (2020-04-28)

Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web spiders have drastically declined
The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. The main reason for this is the shrinking food supply available to these insectivorous animals. This is demonstrated in a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and Ghent University (Belgium), as reported in the scientific journal Insects. (2020-04-23)

Ants or plants? Evolutionary diversification factors of aphids
The plant-feeding insect aphids are thought to have diversified by shifting their host plants to other closely related plant species. However, the aphid Stomaphis established not only association with host plants but also mutualistic relationship with ants. The team examined that the relative importance of host plants and mutualistic partners in their diversification and found the unusual evolutionary pattern in aphids. (2020-04-10)

Aerial insect trap network describes life in the skies
Like most invasive species, when the soybean aphid arrived in the Midwest in 2000, it brought none of its natural enemies along for the ride. So, naturally, finding itself in the soybean capital of the world, the tiny insect went bonkers. Taking advantage of a nifty ability to reproduce without mating, populations exploded and the soybean aphid quickly became the number one insect pest affecting the crop. (2020-03-12)

Disease-causing virus manipulates crop plants to favor its vector
The virus that causes barley yellow dwarf, the most widespread disease of cereal crops, manipulates its host plant and insect vector to promote its own survival, according to an international team of researchers. The group found that the virus raises the temperature of its host plants along with the heat-tolerance of its aphid vectors to create regions on the plants where aphids can feed free from competing insects. The findings could have implications for crop health as the global climate warms. (2020-03-10)

Symbiotic viruses help host insects override the plant's defenses
Aphids, small sap-sucking insects, are virus carriers responsible for significant economic losses in many crops worldwide. Many aphids form symbiotic and mutualistic relationships with viruses, an aspect of plant disease that has not been well explored. (2020-02-03)

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds
For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's cells -- not by S. sessilifolia itself. (2020-01-29)

Specific insulin-like peptide regulates how beetle 'weapons' grow
A scientist from Tokyo Metropolitan University and coworkers have discovered that a specific insulin-like peptide called ILP2 regulates the size of 'weapons' in Gnatocerus cornutus beetles in different nutritional environments. They found diminished mandible size when expression of the peptide was suppressed, and that it was specifically expressed in the 'fat body', where beetles store nutrients. This has important implications for understanding how striking growth occurs in different environments for different organisms. (2020-01-11)

Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time
For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers. (2019-10-11)

CABI scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan
For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. This research could be useful to develop better pest management methods and safer, healthier crops in wheat production. (2019-10-10)

MSU research team discovers new microbe in wheat stem sawfly
Montana State University researchers Carl Yeoman and David Weaver published a paper with a group of colleagues in August discussing the potential ramifications of the discovery for combating the damage done by these sawflies each year. (2019-09-18)

Aphid-stressed pines show different secondary organic aerosol formation
Plants emit gases, called volatile organic compounds (VOCs), that enter the atmosphere, where they can interact with other natural and human-made molecules to form secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). These tiny, suspended particles influence atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation and sunlight scattering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry have shown that aphid-infested Scots pine trees produce a different mixture of VOCs than healthy plants, which then leads to different SOAs. (2019-09-11)

Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution. (2019-06-14)

BTI researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses
Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute and USDA-ARS are examining this relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests. As described in the May 22 issue of Phytobiomes, the researchers uncovered what may be the first example of cooperation between a plant virus and an insect virus to increase their likelihood to spread. (2019-06-13)

Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline
Migratory hoverflies are 'key' to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows. (2019-06-13)

Insect-deterring sorghum compounds may be eco-friendly pesticide
Compounds produced by sorghum plants to defend against insect feeding could be isolated, synthesized and used as a targeted, nontoxic insect deterrent, according to researchers who studied plant-insect interactions that included field, greenhouse and laboratory components. (2019-04-03)

Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder
The development of a simply made and easy-to-use planting device could make growing important herbs and beneficial insect-attracting plants significantly more efficient and effective. The low-cost tool, known as the Slide Hammer Seeder (a jab-style seeder), gives farmers and gardeners specific control in sowing plants with very small seeds. (2019-02-21)

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species. (2019-02-08)

Effort clarifies major branch of insect tree of life
The insects known as Hemiptera are not a particularly glamorous bunch. This group includes stink bugs, bed bugs, litter bugs, scale insects and aphids. Their closest relatives are thrips, bark lice and parasitic lice. But these insects together make up one of the twiggiest branches of the tree of life. A new study uses molecular data to tease out their family relationships and evolutionary history. (2018-11-26)

How people power can track alien species -- Study
New research published in the Nature journal Scientific Data shows how the public can play a vital role in helping to track invasive species. (2018-10-24)

Aphids use sight to avoid deadly bacteria, could lead to pest control
Pea aphids -- a serious agricultural pest -- have the ability to see and avoid a common, aphid-killing bacteria on plant leaves, according to a new Cornell study published Sept. 27 in Current Biology. (2018-09-27)

Soy natural: Genetic resistance against aphids
Each year, soybean aphids cause billions of dollars in crop losses. In a recent study, researchers have taken a big step toward identifying new soybean genes associated with aphid resistance. (2018-08-29)

Plant virus alters competition between aphid species
In the world of plant-feeding insects, who shows up first to the party determines the overall success of the gathering; yet viruses can disrupt these intricate relationships, according to researchers at Penn State. (2018-08-22)

Aphids manipulate their food
Aphids - who hasn't been bothered by these little insects at one time or another? Why do they reproduce on plants so successfully? These are among the questions that Professor Dr Caroline Müller and her research team are addressing at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Biology. They have found out that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to construct a niche on their own host plants. (2018-07-31)

Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus
Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. But little is known about how the fungi affect behavior. UC Berkeley scientists have now found a fungus that infects the common lab fly, Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model in which to explore behavior-manipulating fungi. They found that the fungus invades the nervous system first while slowly eating the fly's fat and organs. (2018-07-31)

Night-time lighting changes how species interact
Night-time lighting from streetlights and other sources has complex and unexpected effects on communities of plants and animals, new research shows. (2018-07-26)

Birds eat 400 to 500 million tonnes of insects annually
Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control. (2018-07-09)

Organic insect deterrent for agriculture
Traditional insecticides are killers: they not only kill pests, they also endanger bees and other beneficial insects, as well as affecting biodiversity in soils, lakes, rivers and seas. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an alternative: A biodegradable agent that keeps pests at bay without poisoning them. (2018-06-06)

How do insects survive on a sugary diet?
In research published in G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, show that bacteriocytes -- specific aphid cells that house the symbiotic bacteria -- have different DNA methylation patterns depending on what type of plant sap the aphid is consuming. (2018-05-24)

Cultivating cannabis
Not long ago, cannabis growers learned their trade mainly by trial and error, passing along tips to others behind a veil of secrecy. But with expanding legalization of cannabis in the US, this situation is changing. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, cannabis growers are starting to benefit from increased communication and scientific research about the plant and its cultivation. (2018-05-23)

Page 1 of 6 | 223 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.