Current Apple News and Events

Current Apple News and Events, Apple News Articles.
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Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Mount Sinai study finds wearable devices can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis
Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a Mount Sinai study. (2021-02-08)

Study identifies noncoding RNA involved in immune response and sepsis
When the body's immune response to an infection gets out of control, the result can be sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which an overwhelming inflammatory response can lead rapidly to failure of multiple organs and death. In a new study, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecule that regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in immune system cells called macrophages and affects the susceptibility of mice to septic shock. (2021-02-01)

Opportunities to better detect, manage and treat patients with undiagnosed atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a higher risk of complications including ischemic stroke, cognitive decline, heart failure, myocardial infarction and death. AF frequently is undetected until complications such as stroke or heart failure occur. A new report led by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researcher Emelia J. Benjamin, MD, ScM, builds upon a recently conducted National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's virtual workshop that focused on identifying key research priorities related to AF screening. (2021-01-25)

Aphids suck: Invasive aphid found on Danish apple trees
The spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola, an invasive pest, has been discovered for the first time in Denmark by University of Copenhagen researchers. The extent of its current distribution remains unknown, but in time, it could prove to be a troublesome pest for Danish apple growers. (2021-01-19)

The puzzle of nonhost resistance: why do pathogens harm some plants but not others?
There are many examples of plants that are susceptible to one pathogen but able to resist another closely related pathogen. By uncovering the mechanism behind resistance, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the plant immune system and can also uncover previously unknown aspects of immune signaling and regulation, which can help scientists improve resistance against a broader spectrum of pathogens. (2020-12-29)

After 100 years, Cornell University plant pathologists revisit fire blight hypothesis
Historically credited as being the first bacterium ever characterized as a plant pathogen, fire blight is a bacterial disease that leads to significant losses of pear and apple. The role of insects in the spread of this disease has been long studied. In a new study, plant pathologists based at Cornell University and Cornell AgriTech take a hypothesis that has been more or less ignored for 100 years and provided support for its validity. (2020-12-01)

Oxford University podcast returns with season on the History of Pandemics
The University of Oxford's CASE Gold Award winning podcast, Futuremakers, will return for its third season at the end of October. (2020-11-27)

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has developed self-powered sensors that can run for more than a year. (2020-11-16)

Artificial night lighting has widespread impacts on nature
Artificial night-time lighting has a diverse range of effects across the natural world and should be limited where possible, researchers say. (2020-11-02)

Silk road contains genomic resources for improving apples
The fabled Silk Road is responsible for one of our favorite and most valuable fruits: the domesticated apple. Researchers have now assembled complete reference genomes and pan-genomes for apple and its two main wild progenitors, providing detailed genetic insights into apple domestication and important fruit traits that could help plant breeders improve the crop's flavor, texture, and resistance to stress and disease. (2020-11-02)

Common liverwort study has implications for crop manipulation
A new study on genetic pathways in the common liverwort could have future implications for crop manipulation. (2020-10-26)

Stay-at-home orders cut noise exposure nearly in half
People's exposure to environmental noise dropped nearly in half during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed data from the Apple Hearing Study. (2020-10-09)

Psychology: Human spatial memory prioritizes high calorie foods
Humans more accurately recall the locations of high calorie than low calorie foods, according to a study in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that human spatial memory, which allows people to remember where objects are in relation to each another, has evolved to prioritize the location of high calorie foods. (2020-10-08)

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism. (2020-09-17)

Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study, co-led by University of Cincinnati researchers, describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil. (2020-09-15)

Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
Researchers are investigating the science of food drying to design faster, cheaper and better ways to store food. (2020-09-13)

Mold now associated with food quality
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied a range of perceptions among Danes about good, healthy and safe foodstuffs. Their findings report that mold prone foods are considered to be more natural than those with long shelf lives. This perception has changed in recent years and researchers believe that it may reverse itself in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. (2020-09-10)

Refined finish for fine fish oil
Not all fish oils are high quality oils, so scientists have developed a superior method to help produce better dietary Omega-3 health and dietary supplements. The new process, explained in a new Science of Food paper, defines how vortex fluidic device processing lifts the quality of active ingredients of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in fish oil. The process was used to enrich Omega-3 fatty acid content of apple juice, remarkably without changing its sensory values which is important for the consumer. (2020-09-09)

Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage. (2020-08-19)

Green apple e-cigarette flavorant triggers reward-related behavior in the brain
A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward, which could heighten reward and drug-seeking behavior, according to researchers at Marshall University. (2020-08-18)

Research helps explain source of pathogen that causes bitter rot disease
Fungal spores responsible for bitter rot disease, a common and devastating infection in fruit, do not encounter their host plants by chance. Turns out, they have a symbiotic association with the plant, often living inside its leaves. The new way of looking at the fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum fioriniae, as a leaf endophyte -- bacterial or fungal microorganisms that colonize healthy plant tissue -- was the outcome of a two-year study conducted by researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (2020-08-14)

NASA's Aqua Satellite shows extent of Apple Fire's burn scar
On Aug. 9, 2020 NASA's Aqua satellite imaged the Apple Fire near Big Bear Lake in California using its false-color bands in order to be able to distinguish burn scars from the surrounding area more easily. (2020-08-10)

NASA's Aqua satellite shows two views of the apple fire
NASA's Aqua satellite took images of the Apple Fire as it continued to spread north across the head of the Mill Creek Canyon, and east into the San Gorgonio Wilderness near San Bernardino, Calif. on Aug. 3, 2020. (2020-08-04)

Green apple flavor in vapes enhances nicotine reward
A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward and is also rewarding itself, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro. (2020-08-03)

NASA satellites show two views of California's Apple Fire
NASA's satellites were working overtime as they snapped pictures of the large Apple Fire in Banning Canyon near San Bernardino, California on Aug. 02, 2020. This fire began on July 31, 2020 and the cause of the fire is still under investigation. To date the fire has consumed 20,516 acres and is 5% contained. (2020-08-03)

Geoengineering's benefits limited for apple crops in India
Geoengineering - spraying sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to combat global warming - would only temporarily and partially benefit apple production in northern India, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. But abruptly ending geoengineering might lead to total crop failure faster than if geoengineering were not done, according to the study - believed to be the first of its kind - in the journal Climatic Change. (2020-07-15)

Newly discovered pathogen in NY apples causes bitter rot disease
In a study of New York state apple orchards, Cornell University plant pathologists have identified a new fungal pathogen that causes bitter rot disease in apples. (2020-07-06)

Blood vessels can make you fat, and yet fit
IBS scientists have reported Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) as a key driver that inhibits the accumulation of potbellies by enabling the proper transport of fatty acid into general circulation in blood vessels, thus preventing insulin resistance. Their findings have been published online in the journal Nature Communications (12 June 2020). (2020-06-24)

Towards an AI diagnosis like the doctor's
Artificial intelligence is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease. But the way these systems work is opaque, and doctors have a better ''overall picture'' when they make the diagnosis. In this publication, Radboudumc researchers show how they can make the AI show how it's working, as well as let it diagnose more like a doctor, thus making AI more relevant to clinical practice. (2020-06-24)

Strategic redundancy can prevent collapse of supply chains during global crises
Companies should use redundancy as a way to fortify their operations against unforeseeable events such as pandemics. (2020-06-04)

Pure red LEDs fulfill a primary goal
First high-intensity, low-voltage red LEDs made from nitride semiconductors. (2020-05-06)

The digital diagnostic helper: Apple Watch detects severe coronary ischemia
Apple watches have long been able to record electrocardiograms (ECGs) and send warnings in the event of an irregular heart rhythm such as atrial fibrillation. Now a team of cardiologists from the Cardiopraxis Mainz and the Department of Cardiology of the University Medical Center Mainz discovered that, with the help of an Apple Watch, cardiac arrhythmias as well as coronary ischemia can be identified. This is what they reportin the European Heart Journal. (2020-04-30)

How secure are four and six-digit mobile phone PINs?
A German-American team of IT security researchers has investigated how users choose the PIN for their mobile phones and how they can be convinced to use a more secure number combination. They found that six-digit PINs actually provide little more security than four-digit ones. They also showed that the blacklist used by Apple to prevent particularly frequent PINs could be optimised and that it would make even greater sense to implement one on Android devices. (2020-03-11)

Sensory information underpins abstract knowledge
What we learn through our senses drives how knowledge is sorted in our brains, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-09)

Heart rate measurements of wearable monitors vary by activity, not skin color
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that while different wearable technologies, like smart watches and fitness trackers, can accurately measure heart rate across a variety of skin tones, the accuracy between devices begins to vary wildly when they measure heart rate during different types of everyday activities, like typing. (2020-02-12)

For complex decisions, narrow them down to two
When choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options. The quicker we do that, the faster we make the decision. Psychologists from the University of Basel have reported these findings in the scientific journal Nature Human Behaviour. (2020-02-03)

Siri, help me quit -- what does your smart device say when you ask for help with addiction?
A new study published in Nature Partner Journal's Digital Medicine finds that the leading intelligent virtual assistants fail to understand questions about where to find help for substance misuse. Intelligent virtual assistants were frequently confused providing no response, and in one instance the response was for a recommendation on where to buy drugs. But the study's authors remain optimistic that smart devices could be a game changer for helping the millions now seeking help with addiction and the millions more to come. (2020-01-29)

Prostate cancer can now be diagnosed better using artificial intelligence
Researchers at Radboud university medical center have developed a 'deep learning' system that is better than most pathologists at determining the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. The AI system, which uses tissue samples to arrive at its diagnosis, taught itself to identify prostate cancer based on data from over 1200 patients. The Radboud team is now working with researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Kaggle, a Google subsidiary, with the intention to continue developing these methods as part of a major international competition. (2020-01-09)

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