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Current Apple News and Events, Apple News Articles.
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New research shows live chats can increase sales by nearly 16%
Live chat tools allow for communication between sellers and buyers. They are popular instruments for e-commerce sites that don't have the advantage of face-to-face communication that brick-and-mortar stores do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research says these live chats can actually increase sales and boost profits. (2020-01-08)

When do alcohol-dependent mothers parent harshly?
While parents with substance use disorders are more likely to treat their children harshly, they don't do so all the time. What are the triggers? And how can substance-dependent mothers and their medical care providers predict difficulties across challenging parenting contexts? (2019-11-19)

Minimizing post-harvest food losses
Research team from Graz, Austria, develops biological methods to improve the shelf life of fruit and vegetables. (2019-11-07)

When managing a company, less is more
New branding research from Michigan State University offers strategies for companies to increase market share -- revealing who's doing it right and who needs to make a change. (2019-11-05)

Learning from mistakes and transferable skills -- the attributes for a worker robot
Practice makes perfect -- it is an adage that has helped humans become highly dexterous and now it is an approach that is being applied to robots. (2019-11-04)

Non-GM produce earns 'halo effect' under new labeling laws
Consumers were more willing to buy unlabeled produce after being shown food tagged as ''genetically modified'' in a new Cornell University study that comes two months before a new federal law, requiring genetically modified organism disclosure labels on food products, goes into effect. (2019-10-31)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Mechanisms of real-time speech interpretation in the human brain revealed
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding how we're able to understand spoken language so rapidly, and it involves a huge and complex set of computations in the brain. (2019-09-30)

A little kindness goes a long way for worker performance and health
Small gestures of kindness by employers can have big impacts on employees' health and work performance, according to an international team of researchers. The team specifically examined the effects of employers enhancing the lunches of bus drivers in China with fresh fruit and found that it reduced depression among the drivers and increased their confidence in their own work performance. (2019-09-10)

Hand- versus machine-harvested juice and cider apples: A comparison of phenolic profiles
Study conducted to determine if there is a measurable impact of harvest method on the phenolic profile of 'Brown Snout' juice and cider to better inform equipment adoption. Over-the-row machine harvesting resulted in a final product of similar quality at reduced labor costs, and thus shows potential for increasing the commercial sustainability of cider apple operations. (2019-08-30)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from W├╝rzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Foodborne pathogen sheltered by harmless bacteria that support biofilm formation
Pathogenic bacteria that stubbornly lurk in some apple-packing facilities may be sheltered and protected by harmless bacteria that are known for their ability to form biofilms, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery could lead to development of alternative foodborne-pathogen-control strategies. (2019-08-21)

Genomic research led by HKBU unravels mystery of invasive apple snails
Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. The findings could facilitate the development of effective genetic control measures for these destructive crop-eating snails. (2019-08-12)

Sleep, snacks and shift work
If you're one of Australia's 1.4 million shiftworkers, eating at irregular times is just par for the course -- but have you ever stopped to think about the impact this might have on your body? In a new research study by the University of South Australia, researchers have investigated whether altering food intake during the nightshift could optimize how shiftworkers feel during the night and reduce their sleepiness. (2019-08-09)

Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them
A Cornell University study, published in Ecological Entomology, investigates for the first time what spotted-wing drosophila adults and larvae eat, and where they lay their eggs, when these short-lived fruits are not in season. (2019-08-06)

Laser solitons: Theory, topology and potential applications
Solitons have found applications in data transmission but even these gradually dissipate unless the medium they travel through has ultra-low absorbance. Nikolay Rosanov of St. Petersburg, Russia and his team have been working on a solution to this problem -- laser solitons -- since the 1980s; a colloquium paper summarising their recent work in this area has now been published in EPJ D as 'Laser Solitons in 1D, 2D and 3D'. (2019-07-31)

Food quality control made faster and easier
Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future. (2019-07-30)

A first bad apple spoils the bunch
People are more likely to judge the performance of a group based on member's that are labelled as first or number one than they are on any other member, according to new research led by Cass Business School academic Dr Janina Steinmetz. (2019-07-30)

An apple carries about 100 million bacteria -- good luck washing them off
Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community -- which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment. (2019-07-24)

Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water
A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new Cornell University research. (2019-07-19)

Pear-shaped is better for postmenopausal women, even if they are normal weight
Postmenopausal women who are 'apple' shaped rather than 'pear' shaped are at greater risk of heart and blood vessel problems, even if they have a normal, healthy body mass index (BMI) according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-06-30)

Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence
Researchers say fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence. Surveys are often used to understand how people use their smartphone, but these are poorly related to actual smartphone use when measured with an app. This means that existing evidence suggesting that screen time is 'addictive' cannot be used to justify any change of policy. High smartphone usage has been linked to anxiety and depression but there is insufficient evidence to support these conclusions. (2019-06-12)

Exploring the origins of the apple
Recent archaeological finds of ancient preserved apple seeds across Europe and West Asia combined with historical, paleontological, and recently published genetic data are presenting a fascinating new narrative for one of our most familiar fruits. The apple was originally spread by ancient megafauna and later as a process of trade along the Silk Road. When previously separated varieties came into contact, hybridization and grafting allowed for the development of the varieties that we know today. (2019-05-27)

Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect
Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge. (2019-04-30)

Corruption contagion: How legal and finance firms are at greater risk of corruption
Companies with fewer levels of management such as legal, accountancy and investment banking firms could be up to five times more susceptible to corruption than similar sized organizations with a taller structure such as those in manufacturing, a new study by the University of Sussex and Imperial College has revealed. (2019-04-24)

The tremendous supply of apple cultivars in Wyoming
Study provides insight into possible heritage apple cultivars that could be grown in Wyoming and also in other states with similar harsh growing conditions. (2019-03-26)

Study gives glimpse into how wearable tech may help flag heart rhythm problems
According to preliminary data from the study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session, the Apple Watch was able to detect AFib in a small group of people who had been alerted by the app as having an irregular heartbeat. (2019-03-17)

Abnormal heart rhythm detected by smartwatch: What does it mean?
Should an abnormal heart rhythm detected by a smartwatch in otherwise healthy young adults be treated? Are the benefits of this new technology worth the risks? Where is the technology headed? (2019-03-16)

Peeling back the data: NYS apple industry has larger economic impact
A Cornell University team has found that the economic impact of the apple industry in New York State is 21 percent larger than traditional models suggest. Researchers used the apple industry as a case study to test a new -- more precise -- framework for economic impact analysis. (2019-03-07)

Sandia spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices
The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation. (2019-02-27)

Infants exposed to corticosteroids in utero are smaller at birth, study finds
Infants exposed to antenatal corticosteroid therapy (ACT) to accelerate lung maturation have a clinically significant reduction in birth size, according to a new of study of 278,508 births published this week in PLOS Medicine by Alina Rodriguez of the University of Lincoln and Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues. (2019-02-26)

Most laptops vulnerable to attack via peripheral devices, say researchers
Many modern laptops and an increasing number of desktop computers are much more vulnerable to hacking through common plug-in devices than previously thought, according to new research. (2019-02-25)

Keep calm and don't carry on when parenting teens
In a new study, University of Rochester psychologists find that mothers and fathers who are less capable of dampening down their anger are more likely to resort to harsh discipline aimed at their teens, and that fathers in particular were not as good at considering alternative explanations for their teens' behavior. (2019-02-19)

To tool or not to tool?
Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists around Isabelle Laumer found out that the apes carefully weighed their options. To do so the apes considered the details such as differences in quality between the two food rewards and the functionality of the available tools in order to obtain a high quality food reward. (2019-02-14)

Looking to choose a healthy post-workout snack? Decide early, study says
A post-exercise snack can threaten to undo the gains (or losses) of a workout. But the decision itself may depend on when you make it, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Participants asked to choose between an apple and brownie were about one-third more likely to favor the fruit when deciding before vs. after their workouts. (2019-01-31)

Your smartphone now knows if you smoke and may help you quit
A study from Gero longevity company shows that smoking cessation leads to rejuvenation that can be monitored by a mobile phone app (2019-01-23)

In the apple orchards: A new way to gauge bee pollinator success
A decade-long analysis of bee activity in apple orchards in New York showed decreased pollination services in some orchards beyond what simple counts of bee number or species richness would predict. (2019-01-17)

Orchards in natural habitats draw bee diversity, improve apple production
Apple orchards surrounded by agricultural lands are visited by a less diverse collection of bee species than orchards surrounded by natural habitats, according to a new Cornell University-led study, published in the journal Science. (2019-01-17)

VAT fat may cause pathogenic obesity
VAT, Visceral Adipose Tissue, a kind of fat that accumulates around the abdominal organs, has an important immune function. The body may choose to turn excess fat into FAT not SAT, subcutaneous fat when a fetus is not well nourished and is likely to face disease. (2019-01-11)

Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered by WSU researchers
A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics. (2018-12-13)

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