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Current Apples News and Events, Apples News Articles.
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First maps of areas suitable for spotted lanternfly's establishment in US and world
Maps identifying the areas suitable for establishment of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the United States and other countries have been published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Agricultural Research Service scientists. (2019-10-03)

Research suggests there's a better way to teach physics to university students
Physicists and educators at the University of Kansas has developed a curriculum for college-level students that shows promise in helping students in introductory physics classes further practice and develop their calculus skills. (2019-09-25)

New standard of reference for assessing solar forecast proposed
Being able to accurately forecast how much solar energy reaches the surface of the Earth is key to guiding decisions for running solar power plants and new work in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy looks to provide a standard of reference to the field. Dazhi Yang proposes an improved way to assess day-ahead solar forecasting, which combines two popular reference methods for weather forecasting, namely persistence and climatology. His approach provides a new way to gauge the skill of a forecaster. (2019-09-24)

Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? Neuroscientists (UNIGE) developed a mathematical model of the optimal choice strategy. They demonstrated that optimal decisions must be based not on the true value of the possible choices but on the difference in value between them. (2019-09-11)

Bigger spend, same end: Post-hospital care study suggests ways to save Medicare money
A new study reveals that spending on post-hospital care for patients who have traditional Medicare coverage costs much more than it does for an identical patient with private insurance. And despite the difference in cost, both patients have about the same clinical ending -- as measured in their odds of ending up back in the hospital again, the study shows. (2019-09-03)

Hand- versus machine-harvested juice and cider apples: A comparison of phenolic profiles
Study conducted to determine if there is a measurable impact of harvest method on the phenolic profile of 'Brown Snout' juice and cider to better inform equipment adoption. Over-the-row machine harvesting resulted in a final product of similar quality at reduced labor costs, and thus shows potential for increasing the commercial sustainability of cider apple operations. (2019-08-30)

Highest-resolution human brain 'parts list' to date lays road map to better treatments
A new study from the Allen Institute for Brain Science has written the most detailed 'parts list' of the human brain to date. This categorization of our brain cell types lays the groundwork to improve our understanding of our own brains and to dramatically change how we treat human brain diseases and disorders. (2019-08-21)

California's rooftop-solar boom leaves equity gap
California leads the nation in the adoption of rooftop solar systems, but information on which communities do, and do not, benefit from these installations has been limited. The adoption of distributed solar -- rooftop installations as opposed to industrial-scale operations like solar farms -- is closely correlated with socioeconomic status and health, environmental and demographic indicators. The study, published online August 20, 2019 in Energy Policy, is the first peer-reviewed analysis of distributed solar adoption in disadvantaged communities. (2019-08-21)

Arctic could be iceless in September if temps increase 2 degrees
Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati. The study by an international team of researchers was published in Nature Communications. (2019-08-13)

Apples, tea and moderation -- the 3 ingredients for a long life
Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research. (2019-08-13)

An apple carries about 100 million bacteria -- good luck washing them off
Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community -- which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment. (2019-07-24)

Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology
A UC Berkeley team with NSF funding has compiled a roadmap for the future of synthetic or engineering biology, based on the input of 80 leaders in the field from more than 30 institutions. The report provides a strong case that the federal government should invest in this area, not only to improve public health, food crops and the environment, but also to fuel the economy and maintain the country's leadership in synthetic/engineering biology. (2019-06-19)

ASCO: Entrectinib gets edge over crizotinib against ROS1+ lung cancer
Median time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) on crizotinib was 8.8 months; TTD of patients using entrectinib was 14.6 months. Compared with patients on entrectinib, patients on crizotinib had an additional 44 percent chance that their cancer would resume its growth. (2019-05-30)

Exploring the origins of the apple
Recent archaeological finds of ancient preserved apple seeds across Europe and West Asia combined with historical, paleontological, and recently published genetic data are presenting a fascinating new narrative for one of our most familiar fruits. The apple was originally spread by ancient megafauna and later as a process of trade along the Silk Road. When previously separated varieties came into contact, hybridization and grafting allowed for the development of the varieties that we know today. (2019-05-27)

Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes
If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs? (2019-05-23)

Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage
One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves. At present, no existing technology provides large-scale storage and energy retrieval for sustainable energy at a low financial and environmental cost. Engineered electroactive microbes could be part of the solution. (2019-05-23)

Can recreational sports really make you a better student?
A new Michigan State University study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year. (2019-05-10)

Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect
Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge. (2019-04-30)

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials
Self-assembling synthetic materials come together when tiny, uniform building blocks interact and form a structure. However, nature lets materials like proteins of varying size and shape assemble, allowing for complex architectures that can handle multiple tasks. (2019-04-18)

IPOs help communities prosper, new research shows
Companies that go public on the stock market provide an economic boost to the local communities where they're based, according to new research from Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business. (2019-04-18)

White people's eating habits produce most greenhouse gases
White individuals disproportionately affect the environment through their eating habits by eating more foods that require more water and release more greenhouse gases through their production compared to foods black and Latinx individuals eat, according to a new report published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology. (2019-03-27)

The tremendous supply of apple cultivars in Wyoming
Study provides insight into possible heritage apple cultivars that could be grown in Wyoming and also in other states with similar harsh growing conditions. (2019-03-26)

Early discharge after lung surgery benefits patients without raising readmission risk
The finding indicates that early discharge is a safe practice for institutions with well-established enhanced recovery pathways. (2019-03-20)

Peeling back the data: NYS apple industry has larger economic impact
A Cornell University team has found that the economic impact of the apple industry in New York State is 21 percent larger than traditional models suggest. Researchers used the apple industry as a case study to test a new -- more precise -- framework for economic impact analysis. (2019-03-07)

Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut
A new study in mice shows dietary fiber promotes the aggregation of gut particles. (2019-02-20)

Diet could help runners beat stomach issues
Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement. (2019-02-14)

Fighting the crave for fattening food? Just surround yourself in its scent
A new study proves one sense can compensate another. (2019-01-16)

Assessing the performance of multiple influenza forecasting models
In what the authors believe is the first documented comparison of several real-time infectious disease forecasting models by different teams across many seasons, five research groups report this week that a majority of models consistently showed higher accuracy than historical baseline models. (2019-01-15)

Where the brain turns quality and quantity into value
Researchers have pinpointed a part of the human brain responsible for 'on-the-fly' decision-making. According to the findings published in JNeurosci, the anterior cingulate cortex integrates disparate information about the desirability and amount of an option to inform choice. (2018-11-19)

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar
Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2018-10-31)

Asian elephants could be the maths kings of the jungle
Asian elephants demonstrate numeric ability which is closer to that observed in humans rather than in other animals. This is according to lead author Naoko Irie of SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) in Japan. (2018-10-22)

The impact of microplastics on the environment unclear, study suggests
A review of more than 300 global studies has revealed a large 'mismatch' in the types of microplastics measured in the environment to those tested for effects in the laboratory. (2018-10-17)

Text messages quickly track health care use during Ebola outbreak
A new study from the NYU College of Global Public Health and NYU Tandon School of Engineering, published in Nature Digital Medicine, used text message surveys to determine in real time how people used maternal health services during a recent Ebola outbreak and measured a drop in hospital-based births during the outbreak. (2018-10-02)

UCF selling experimental Martian dirt -- $20 a kilogram, plus shipping
The University of Central Florida is selling Martian dirt, $20 a kilogram plus shipping. A team of UCF astrophysicists has developed a scientifically based, standardized method for creating Martian and asteroid soil known as simulants. The team published its findings this month in the journal Icarus. (2018-09-28)

Promising phase 1/2 results for entrectinib against ROS1+ non-small cell lung cancer
Results of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials of the drug entrectinib in ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presented on the press program of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer show a response rate of 77.4 percent for 53 patients evaluable for response, with median duration of response of 24.6 months. (2018-09-24)

Liver allocation system disadvantages children awaiting transplants
Children are at a considerable disadvantage when competing with adults for livers from deceased organ donors in the US allocation system for liver transplants. (2018-09-17)

'I have a sense that it's probably quite bad ... but because I don't see it, I don't know'
Lad culture in English universities is often perceived by university staff as involving 'extreme' behaviour and as being carried out by only a handful of 'bad apples' rather than as a widespread culture that fosters gender-based harassment and violence. But new research, led by Lancaster University, says this perception stems from various factors, including many staff having limited understandings of lad culture which reflect the way it is portrayed in the media. (2018-09-13)

Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road
Studies of ancient plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road. (2018-08-14)

Diverse symbionts of reef corals have endured since 'age of dinosaurs'
Coral-algal partnerships have endured numerous climate change events in their long history, and at least some are likely to survive modern-day global warming as well, suggests an international team of scientists. (2018-08-09)

Corals and algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period
Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought. (2018-08-09)

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