Current Applications News and Events

Current Applications News and Events, Applications News Articles.
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Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly
Researchers in Southampton and San Francisco have developed the first compact 3D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used. (2021-02-10)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

Graphene Flagship study predicts increased market penetration by 2025
Graphene Flagship experts identify key opportunities in graphene commercialisation after a comprehensive three-year analysis of production methods and potential applications. (2021-01-25)

Scientists make sustainable polymer from sugars in wood
Scientists from the University of Bath have made a sustainable polymer using the second most abundant sugar in nature, xylose. (2021-01-11)

Review on functional hydrogel coatings
Hydrogel-coated substrates combine the merits of both the substrates and hydrogels, enabling new functions and applications. Typical applications of hydrogel coatings can be found in both medical and non-medical areas, such as soft devices and robotics, invasive medical devices and implants. The emerging topic of functional hydrogel coatings are reviewed from three aspects: functions and applications of hydrogel coatings, methods of preparing hydrogel coatings with strong adhesion, and tests to evaluate the adhesion. (2020-12-22)

International research project investigates photosensitive carbon nanoparticles
An international team of researchers, including researchers from FAU headed by Prof. Dr. Dirk M. Guldi have now managed to identify the fundamental problems relating to the photophysics and photochemistry of carbon nanocolloids (CNC), and ascertain possible approaches for research into these readily available, non-toxic and adaptable nanomaterials. (2020-12-14)

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (2020-12-07)

Tunable rainbow light trapping in ultrathin resonator arrays
Light squeezed into nanoscale metallic gaps has a myriad of applications in sensing, energy, and nonlinear optics. Recently, scientists at the University of Toronto have developed a new paradigm for the design of ultrathin metallic nanostructures which allows for precision tailoring to fit any desired application. This design strategy, coupled with a novel fabrication technique, provides a promising platform for the advancement of nanoscale optics. (2020-12-01)

Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfi
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete. Researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications--a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had comparable strength and durability after five years of being in service. (2020-11-30)

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics. To summarize recent fascinating work about the strain engineering of 2D materials, scientists in China write a review article that gives people a comprehensive introduction to this field, including the strain field theory, tunable band structure and optical properties of 2D materials under strain field, and their photonic applications. (2020-11-23)

A meta-analysis of major complications between traditional pacemakers and leadless pacemakers
A Meta-analysis of Major Complications between Traditional Pacemakers and Leadless Pacemakers. In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0596, Diyu Cui, Yimeng Liao, Jianlin Du and Yunqing Chen from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider major complications between traditional pacemakers and leadless pacemakers. (2020-11-19)

Magnetic spray: Giving inanimate objects new bionergy
Recently, researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with the City University of Hong Kong (CityU), have developed an agglutinate, reprogrammable, disintegrable and biocompatible magnetic spray (M-spray) that can easily turn inanimate objects into millirobots. (2020-11-18)

CCNY & partners in quantum algorithm breakthrough
Researchers led by City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi report the development of a quantum algorithm with the potential to study a class of many-electron quantums system using quantum computers. Their paper, entitled ''Creating and Manipulating a Laughlin-Type ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall State on a Quantum Computer with Linear Depth Circuits,'' appears in the December issue of PRX Quantum, a journal of the American Physical Society. (2020-11-13)

Graphene controls laser frequency combs in fiber
Tuning laser frequency combs electrically can enrich diversity of comb outputs and help to stabilize them actively. By using a graphene heterogeneous fiber microcavity, researchers recently achieve such electrically tunable laser microcombs in-situ. In this implementation, graphene heterostructure was utilized as saturable absorber, temperature controller and dynamic feedback receiver simultaneously. Hence, rich frequency combs with span over half an octave, repetition 10GHz~80GHz, and phase noise down to -130 dBc/Hz@10kHz are generated. (2020-11-11)

NUS researchers invent flexible and highly reliable sensor
Known as Tactile Resistive Annularly Cracked E-Skin (TRACE), this novel sensor material developed by the National University of Singapore researchers is five times better than conventional soft materials, and could be used in wearable health technology devices, or in robotics to perceive surface texture. (2020-11-02)

Physicists circumvent centuries-old theory to cancel magnetic fields
A team of scientists including two physicists at the University of Sussex has found a way to circumvent a 178-year old theory which means they can effectively cancel magnetic fields at a distance. They are the first to be able to do so in a way which has practical benefits. (2020-10-28)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

Engineers pre-train AI computers to make them even more powerful
Engineers at CSEM have developed a new machine-learning method that paves the way for artificial intelligence to be used in applications that until now have been deemed too sensitive. The method, which has been tested by running simulations on a climate-control system for a 100-room building, is poised to deliver energy savings of around 20%. (2020-09-22)

Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress. This discovery helps explain how plant structures can range from floppy grasses to hard wood trees and is important for understanding dietary fibre properties in nutrition. The findings also have applications in medicine, agriculture and a range of other industries. (2020-09-17)

Lipid-Oligonucleotides (LONs) --- Promising materials for bioapplications
Lipid-oligonucleotides (LONs) are promising biological materials with special amphiphilic structures and unique functionalities of two moieties, contributing to different bioapplications (from biosensors to biomedicines). LONs have been employed in cellular microenvironment monitoring and mechanical forces measurements, and have shown potential in developing targeted theranostics as well as controllable nanoreactors. This review will discuss the recent progress of using LONs in various bioapplications and the remaining challenges, while leaving some suggestions for future improvement. (2020-08-20)

First ever observation of 'time crystals' interacting
For the first time ever, scientists have witnessed the interaction of a new phase of matter known as 'time crystals'. The discovery may lead to applications in quantum information processing. First theorised in 2012 by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek and identified in 2016, time crystals exhibit the bizarre property of being in constant, repeating motion in time despite no external input. (2020-08-17)

Selective conversion of reactive lithium compounds made possible
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new catalyst that can catalyse reactions to produce pharmaceuticals or chemicals used in agriculture. It creates carbon-carbon bonds between what are known as organolithium compounds without creating any unwanted by-products. (2020-08-12)

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing
A team of physicists and chemists has produced the first porous graphene ribbons in which specific carbon atoms in the crystal lattice are replaced with nitrogen atoms. These ribbons have semiconducting properties that make them attractive for applications in electronics and quantum computing, as reported by researchers from the Universities of Basel, Bern, Lancaster and Warwick in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-07-08)

COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality
Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up. This could decrease the mortality of patients affected by COVID-19 (2020-06-24)

New method predicts spin dynamics of materials for quantum computing
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a theoretical foundation and new computational tools for predicting a material's spin dynamics, a key property for building solid-state quantum computing platforms and other applications of spintronics. (2020-06-03)

Terahertz radiation can disrupt proteins in living cells
Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics and collaborators have discovered that terahertz radiation, contradicting conventional belief, can disrupt proteins in living cells without killing the cells. (2020-06-02)

'A litmus paper for CO2:' Scientists develop paper-based sensors for carbon dioxide
A new sensor for detecting carbon dioxide can be manufactured on a simple piece of paper, according to a new study by University of Alberta physicists. (2020-06-02)

Metal collector made of bacteria
Bacteria, fungi and plants sometimes produce metal-binding substances that can be harnessed, for example for the extraction of raw materials, for their separation, for cleaning soils or for medical purposes. Professor Dirk Tischler, Head of the Microbial Biotechnology research group at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), outlines how these natural substances or modified semi-artificial variants of them can be produced according to genetic information in an article in Natural Product Reports from May 19, 2020. (2020-05-26)

Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' -- When materials differentiate between past and future
Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors. This exceptional property calls for new theoretical models and may become important in quantum computing. The research results have recently been published in the scientific journal Nature Physics. (2020-05-18)

Surrey unveils fast-charging super-capacitor technology
Experts from the University of Surrey believe their dream of clean energy storage is a step closer after they unveiled their ground-breaking super-capacitor technology that is able to store and deliver electricity at high power rates, particularly for mobile applications. (2020-05-14)

New invisibility concept and miniaturization of photonic circuits using ultrafast laser
Thanks to its unique three-dimensional manufacturing capacity, ultrafast laser writing is a prime candidate to meet the growing demand for the miniaturization of photonic circuitry, e.g., for scaling up optical quantum computers capacity. Towards this goal, scientists from Canada discovered a phenomenon related to the material electronic resonance that allows a much greater miniaturization of the laser written devices. Surprisingly, the new phenomenon allows other intriguing applications such as a new concept of invisibility. (2020-05-07)

Outer tube-selectively boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes for thermoelectric applications
A research group led by Hiroyuki Muramatsu of Shinshu University succeeded in selectively doping the outer tube of DWNTs with boron. This significantly increased the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient which resulted in a highly enhanced thermoelectric performance of the DWNTs. This advancement allows for an extremely effective method to add functionality such as high electrical conductivity, chemical activation, improvement of thermoelectric properties while maintaining the function of the inner CNT. (2020-05-02)

Does coronary microvascular spasm exist?
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; Fabian Guenther, Andreas Seitz, Valeria Martínez Pereyra, Raffi Bekeredjian, Udo Sechtem and Peter Ong from the Department of Cardiology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart, Germany consider whether coronary microvascular spasm exists. (2020-03-20)

Associations between vaspin levels and coronary artery disease
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0565, Lutfu Askin, Okan Tanriverdi, Hakan Tibilli and Serdar Turkmen from the Department of Cardiology, Adiyaman Education and Research Hospital, Adiyaman, Turkey consider associations between vaspin levels and coronary artery disease. (2020-03-19)

Serum irisin: Pathogenesis and clinical research in cardiovascular diseases
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; Lutfu Askin, Kader Eliz Uzel, Okan Tanriverdi and Serdar Turkmen from the Department of Cardiology, Adiyaman Education and Research Hospital, Adiyaman, Turkey consider serum irisin pathogenesis and clinical research in cardiovascular diseases. (2020-03-19)

Stabilizing freeze-dried cellular machinery unlocks cell-free biotechnology
A low-cost approach improves cell-free biotechnology's utility for bio-manufacturing and portability for field applications. (2020-02-25)

Moving precision communication, metrology, quantum applications from lab to chip
Photonic integration has focused on communications applications traditionally fabricated on silicon chips, because these are less expensive and more easily manufactured, and researchers are exploring promising new waveguide platforms that provide these same benefits for applications that operate in the ultraviolet to the infrared spectrum. These platforms enable a broader range of applications, such as spectroscopy for chemical sensing, precision metrology and computation. A paper in APL Photonics provides a perspective of the field. (2020-02-13)

Bending diamond at the nanoscale
A team of Australian scientists has discovered diamond can be bent and deformed, at the nanoscale at least. The discovery opens up a range of possibilities for the design and engineering of new nanoscale devices in sensing, defence and energy storage but also shows the challenges that lie ahead for nanotechnologies. (2020-02-05)

Safe potassium-ion batteries
Australian scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists write that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a necessary condition for large-scale applications. (2020-01-31)

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA. (2019-12-03)

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