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Current Applications News and Events, Applications News Articles.
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Growing nano-tailored surfaces using micellar brushes
Growing nanoscale polymer brushes on materials' surfaces overcomes a key challenge in surface chemistry, researchers report, creating a new way to fabricate a diverse array of materials that could hold advanced uses in catalysis or chemical separation applications, for example. (2019-11-28)

Commemorating 30 years of optical vortices: A comprehensive review
Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the prediction of OVs, researchers in China, Xing Fu at Tsinghua University, Xiaocong Yuan at Shenzhen University and co-authors, reviewed the 30-year development of understanding and applications of these intriguing phenomena. (2019-11-04)

Determining the shapes of atomic clusters
In a new study published in EPJ B, researchers propose a new method of identifying the morphologies of atomic clusters. They have confirmed that the distinctive geometric shapes of some clusters, as well as the irregularity of amorphous structures, can be fully identified mathematically. (2019-10-25)

Researcher invents an easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle
The technique may have a far-reaching implication for many scientific and industrial applications and disciplines that involve particulate matter. (2019-10-17)

An artificial skin that can help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and -- thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism -- has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements. Applications for the new technology range from medical rehabilitation to virtual reality. (2019-09-27)

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields
Physicists and chemists at the University of Münster (Germany) have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens. Such a method may help to establish nano-structured light landscapes as a tool for material machining, optical tweezers, or high-resolution imaging. The study was published in ''Nature Communications''. (2019-09-20)

Researchers develop low-power, low-cost network for 5G connectivity
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a cheaper and more efficient method for Internet-of-Things devices to receive high-speed wireless connectivity. (2019-08-29)

Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds
Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests. (2019-08-26)

CRISPR-responsive hydrogel system offers programmable approach to smart biomaterials
Using CRISPR as the 'switcher,' hydrogels infused with DNA can be programmed to translate biological information into changes in the constituent gel material's properties, researchers say, triggering the gels to release compounds or nanoparticles, for example. (2019-08-22)

Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. The advancement, recently reported in the journal Science Robotics, was demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies and fluttering tree leaves on a kinetic art piece. (2019-08-21)

Cardiac rehabilitation: Preliminary results
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 121-23; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0069, C. Richard Conti, Jamie. B Conti, and Jeff Plasschaert from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, USA consider the impact of cardiac rehabilitation programs. (2019-08-15)

Researchers design superhydrophobic 'nanoflower' for biomedical applications
Plant leaves have a natural superpower -- they're designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit to the biomedical field. (2019-07-02)

Discovered: A new property of light
Researchers have discovered that light can possess a new property, self-torque. (2019-06-27)

Multimodality imaging training for general and advanced cardiology fellowships
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 1, pp. 9-12(4) ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0010, Chittur A. Sivaram, MD, FACP, FASE, FACC from the Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USA considers multimodality imaging training for general and advanced cardiology fellowships. (2019-05-08)

Emerging techniques for cardiovascular PET
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 1, pp. 13-24(12) ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0004, Austin A. Robinson, MD and Jamieson M. Bourque, MD, MHS from the Cardiovascular Division and the Cardiovascular Imaging Center, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA consider emerging techniques for cardiovascular PET. (2019-05-08)

Mechanics, chemistry and biomedical research join forces for noninvasive tissue therapy
A fortuitous conversation between two University of Illinois scientists has opened a new line of communication between biomedical researchers and the tissues they study. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, show that high-intensity focused ultrasound waves can penetrate biological tissue to activate molecules able to perform specific tasks. (2019-05-06)

Plasma protein may hold promise for wound scaffolds
Researchers in Germany have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds. The team's new scaffold can be attached or detached from a surface, for either in vitro laboratory tissue studies or direct applications in the body. Their discovery, reported today in the journal Biofabrication, could be extremely useful for future use in wound healing and tissue engineering. (2019-03-04)

Phase transition dynamics in two-dimensional materials
Scientists from National University of Singapore have discovered the mechanism involved when transition metal dichalcogenides on metallic substrates transform from the semiconducting 1H-phase to the quasi-metallic 1T'-phase. (2019-02-11)

A new 'twist' on 3D printing renders 'The Thinker,' and other objects
Rotating photosensitive material while exposing it to an evolving light pattern allows for a new type of 3D printing in which printed components can encase other, pre-existing solid objects, researchers report. (2019-01-31)

NUS engineers develop novel strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles for wide-ranging applications
NUS Engineers have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles known as transition metal dichalcogenide quantum dots (TMD QDs) which can potentially generate cancer-killing properties. The team is also looking to optimise TMD QDs for applications such as the next generation TV and electronic device screens, advanced electronics components and even solar cells. (2019-01-24)

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech
A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers at The University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the ultra precise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip. (2019-01-15)

Reviewing advanced applications in drug delivery and medicine
This review seeks to analyze current advances of potential applications of graphene and its family of nano-materials for drug delivery and other major biomedical purposes. (2019-01-11)

New complex carbohydrate discovered in barley
University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics. (2019-01-07)

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect
Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior. (2018-12-27)

Holey graphene as Holy Grail alternative to silicon chips
Novel spintronics applications could stem from introducing holes into graphene to form triangular antidot lattices, granting the material new magnetic properties. (2018-12-19)

New technique to make objects invisible proposed
Researchers at the University of Extremadura have demonstrated the electromagnetic invisibility of objects using an alternative technique, based on filler cloaking. The novelty lies in achieving invisibility from the interior of the objects, without adding external layers. This approach brings numerous advantages and opens up new applications in optics, communications systems and bioengineering. (2018-11-26)

Composite Materials special issue
In this special issue of Science, 'Composite Materials,' three Review articles overview the current applications, constraints and future opportunities for composite materials, those made from two or more materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties. (2018-11-01)

Army research lights the way for new materials
Army researchers are using metallic alloys to lighten the load and enhance the power of Soldier devices used on the battlefield. This research was recently featured on the cover of Advanced Optical Materials. (2018-10-09)

UIC chemical engineers first to functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems
Scientists report that treatment with a superacid causes boron nitride layers to separate into atomically thick sheets, while creating binding sites on the surface of these sheets that provide opportunities to interface with nanoparticles, molecules and other 2D nanomaterials, like graphene. (2018-09-25)

Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin
A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating. (2018-09-20)

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed a novel photoluminescent material that is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials, and is very stable, enhancing our understanding of the quantic nature of photoluminescence. (2018-09-19)

Junior investigators successfully compete for extra NIH grants
More than half of early-career scientists who received their first research project (R01) grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are successful in obtaining subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a study published September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton of NIAID, an NIH institute. (2018-09-13)

Novel nano material for quantum electronics
An international team led by Assistant Professor Kasper Steen Pedersen, DTU Chemistry, has synthesized a novel nano material with electrical and magnetic properties making it suitable for future quantum computers and other applications in electronics. (2018-09-10)

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking
A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer -- co-workers, family members, or guests -- can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches. (2018-08-15)

New method makes spinning collagen microfibres quicker, cheaper, and easier
Scientists in Norfolk, VA (USA) have developed a new method of making collagen microfibres, which could have applications in research, medical devices and clinical treatments ranging from ligament damage to skin burns. (2018-08-14)

Having the right name helps one to find housing
Discrimination against ethnic minorities on the housing market is declining -- in Germany and other Western European countries and in the USA. But a new meta-study shows that applicants' surnames still influence the selection of new tenants. (2018-07-19)

Restrictions on research grant applications cause chaos
Mathematicians at the University of Kent, with input from the University of Sheffield, have established that current restrictions on academics applying for research grants are causing major problems, harming smaller institutions and minorities in the process. To reduce the time and money spent evaluating applications, many funding bodies responded by restricting the number they receive. (2018-07-16)

Biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternative synthesized by CSU chemists
Colorado State University polymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Professor of Chemistry Eugene Chen describes chemical synthesis of a polymer called bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) ­- or P3HB. The compound shows early promise as a substitute for petroleum plastics in major industrial uses. (2018-06-22)

Electronic skin stretched to new limits
A metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics. (2018-06-15)

His bundle pacing: rebirth of an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction system
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 61-71(11); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0030), Michael R. Kaufmann, Matthew S. McKillop, Thomas A. Burkart, Mark Panna, William M. Miles and C. Richard Conti from the Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, US consider His bundle pacing; an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction system. (2018-06-10)

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