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Current Applied Mathematics News and Events, Applied Mathematics News Articles.
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Layer of strength, layer of functionality for biomedical fibers
Wound dressing, tissue scaffolding, controlled and sustained drug delivery, and cardiac patching are all biomedical processes requiring a material that combines strength with functionality. Core-sheath polymer fibers, fibers comprised of a strong core surrounded by a biologically applicable sheath layer, are an affordable way to meet these requirements. In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, researchers discuss methods of producing core-sheath polymer fibers and their promising applications. (2020-10-13)

UCF researchers are working on tech so machines can thermally 'breathe'
In the era of electric cars, machine learning and ultra-efficient vehicles for space travel, computers and hardware are operating faster and more efficiently. But this increase in power comes with a trade-off: They get superhot. To counter this, University of Central Florida researchers are developing a way for large machines to ''breathe'' in and out cooling blasts of water to keep their systems from overheating. The findings are detailed in a recent study in the journal Physical Review Fluids. (2020-10-13)

'Universal law of touch' will enable new advances in virtual reality
Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances. (2020-10-09)

RUDN University scientist suggested a simple model of dense plasma spectral properties
A scientist from RUDN University suggested a new physical model to describe the optical properties of dense plasma. The model was tested on available experimental data and does not require complex calculations. (2020-10-08)

Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning--a subset of artificial intelligence--in science education. (2020-10-07)

New model examines how societal influences affect US political opinions
Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution. (2020-10-02)

How to better understand what makes a virus win during transmission?
The framework, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, was applied on transmission data of the influenza virus, and offers to be a new tool for anticipating the consequences of microbial diversity and optimizing disease control measures. (2020-09-25)

Bioelectronic device achieves unprecedented control of cell membrane voltage
Every living cell maintains a voltage across the cell membrane that results from differences in the concentrations of charged ions inside and outside the cell. In an impressive proof-of-concept demonstration, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has developed a bioelectronic system driven by a machine learning algorithm that can shift the membrane voltage in living cells and maintain it at a set point for 10 hours. (2020-09-24)

When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Using data from all 50 US states plus the District of Columbia, two mathematicians have developed a new method to analyse COVD-19 rates to help policymakers identify demonstrable turning points in infection surges. (2020-09-22)

How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
A team of scientists has now shed new light on how stone forests and other natural structures are created. Its research also offers promise for the manufacturing of sharp-tipped structures, such as the micro-needles and probes needed for scientific research and medical procedures. (2020-09-07)

New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. (2020-09-03)

A new model to predict survival in colorectal cancer
This signature could be useful in clinical practice, especially for colorectal cancer diagnosis and therapy. Future studies should determine the effectiveness of integration in cancer survival analysis and the application on unbalanced data, where the classes are of different sizes, as well as on data with multiple classes. (2020-09-03)

Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
A deep learning algorithm developed at Rice University analyzes data from a deadly landslide in Greenland to show how it may someday predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. (2020-08-24)

Ultra-low voltage proven effective at killing bacteria, study finds
Research into the antimicrobial properties of ultra-low voltage electricity demonstrates that the power creates holes in the bacteria's outer membrane allowing two-way leakage and ultimately killing the cell. (2020-08-17)

USU mathematicians unravel a thread of string theory
Thomas Hill and Andreas Malmendier of Utah State University, and Adrian Clingher of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, explore a string duality between F-theory and heterotic string theory in eight dimensions in paper published in 'Letters in Mathematical Physics.' (2020-08-17)

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision. (2020-08-13)

Research recommends integrated approaches to managing reniform nematodes in cotton
While there are many pests affecting cotton, the reniform nematode is one the most damaging, with the ability to cause annual losses of approximately $33 million within the Mid-Southern United States. Farmers struggle to manage this pest as commercially available resistance is not widespread and a limited number of products are commercially available for use in suppressing the reniform nematode. (2020-08-13)

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape. (2020-08-11)

Successful school instruction is digital - but not exclusively
Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction. However, success depends on the design of the tools used. Success levels are higher when children and young adults do not study alone and when digital instruction is accompanied by paper-based teaching materials, according to the conclusion reached by one of the largest investigations on the topic, evaluating approximately 90 individual studies. (2020-08-10)

Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers at Nagoya University have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel. (2020-08-05)

Improved modelling of nuclear structure in francium aids searches for new physics
Thanks to researchers from The University of Queensland, we now know with much greater certainty the nuclear magnetic moments of francium atoms. (2020-08-04)

How to improve climate modeling and prediction
Mathematicians propose ideas that make it possible to perform much more effective climate simulations than the traditional approach allows. (2020-07-31)

How human sperm really swim: New research challenges centuries-old assumption
A breakthrough in fertility science by researchers from Bristol and Mexico has shattered the universally accepted view of how sperm 'swim'. (2020-07-31)

Can social unrest, riot dynamics be modeled?
Episodes of social unrest rippled throughout Chile in 2019. Researchers specializing in economics, mathematics and physics in Chile and the U.K. banded together to explore the surprising social dynamics people were experiencing. In the journal Chaos, the team reports that social media is changing the rules of the game, and previously applied epidemic-like models, on their own, may no longer be enough to explain current rioting dynamics. (2020-07-21)

STEM not for women?
A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova, research fellows of the HSE University, examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates. According to the study, more than one in three (35%) young women have been led to believe in men's superior mathematical ability. (2020-07-21)

COVID-19 pandemic could be learning opportunity for middle-grade students
Educators could use the COVID-19 outbreak to help middle-schoolers better understand the world, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-14)

Hidden in our genes: Discovering the fate of cell development
Scientists at the University of Sydney have developed a powerful new tool to analyse the fate of cell development by examining individual cells and genetic development within them. Dubbed scHOT for single-cell higher-order testing, the scientists expect the new analytical tool will help develop therapeutic treatments for a wide range of diseases. (2020-07-13)

Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS. (2020-07-09)

UCLA-led team develops ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
A research team led by UCLA materials scientists has demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve. (2020-07-08)

Flashes bright when squeezed tight: How single-celled organisms light up the oceans
Research explains how a unicellular marine organism generates light as a response to mechanical stimulation, lighting up breaking waves at night. (2020-07-06)

Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Scientists at PPPL have gained new insight into a common type of plasma hiccup that interferes with fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality. (2020-06-30)

Toward principles of gene regulation in multicellular systems?
Quantitative biologists from Northwestern combine precision measurements and mathematical models to uncover a common mechanism regulating gene expression during development. (2020-06-30)

An ethical eye on AI
Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and business manage and police Artificial Intelligence systems' biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging commercial choices - an ethical eye on AI. (2020-06-29)

Sexist views on education within families affect future academic choices
The lockdown measures introduced to prevent the spread of the coronavirus have led to classrooms being closed. In certain households, this may result in young people being more influenced by scenarios with a prevalence of sexism -- gender-based discrimination. This is particularly relevant in the case of those students having to make decisions this year, regarding their choice of training module or university degree subject. A study has analysed academic sexism in baccalaureate programmes at schools. (2020-06-26)

Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement. (2020-06-18)

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (2020-06-16)

Determining effective magnetic moment of multicore nanoparticles
Most commercial nanoparticles do not possess a single magnetic core but have small magnetic crystals called crystallites. The important question is how these crystallites behave inside a multicore nanoparticle and how they respond to an applied magnetic field. In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers compare the effective magnetic moments of different multicore nanoparticle systems and shows that they are magnetic-field dependent. The paper's findings are important for researchers optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for various applications. (2020-06-16)

Classes set by ability are hitting children's self-confidence, study finds
The way a vast amount of schools are setup, with classes grouping children based on their ability, is severely affecting pupil's self-confidence. (2020-06-16)

A clique away from more efficient networks
An old branch of mathematics finds a fertile new field of application. (2020-06-14)

Environmental noise changes evolutionary cooperation between cellular components, model shows
Cells are massive factories, containing a multitude of substations devoted to specific tasks all devoted to keeping the overarching organism alive. Until now, researchers have questioned how such diverse components evolve in tandem -- especially when each component can evolve in a variety of ways. Two researchers based in Tokyo, Japan, have developed a statistical physics model to demonstrate how such evolution is possible. The results were published on May 26 in Physical Review Letters. (2020-06-06)

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