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Current Applied Mathematics News and Events, Applied Mathematics News Articles.
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Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures
Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. (2020-06-02)

New model predicts the peaks of the COVID-19 pandemic
This week in the journal Frontiers, researchers describe a single function that accurately describes all existing available data on active COVID-19 cases and deaths -- and predicts forthcoming peaks. (2020-05-29)

NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely resemble spheres. (2020-05-28)

Study shows domestic violence reports on the rise as COVID-19 keeps people at home
A UCLA-led research team has found an increase in domestic violence reports in Los Angeles and Indianapolis since the stay-at-home restrictions were implemented in March. The scholars, who are leaders in applying mathematics to interpret and make sense of police crime data, predict the incidence should gradually decrease as people return to normal routines, but would likely increase again if there is a second wave of COVID-19 infections that prompts new stay-at-home orders. (2020-05-27)

Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria -- until now. (2020-05-06)

Blood flows could be more turbulent than previously expected
Blood flow in the human body is assumed to be mostly smooth and non-turbulent. Unstable and unsteady flow is linked to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis -- one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Now, Professor Björn Hof from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, together with a team of international researchers has shown that our bloodstream is more turbulent than what has been previously thought. (2020-05-04)

Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy
Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment -- which also takes a toll on the patient's body -- might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect. (2020-04-23)

Organic memory devices show promise for flexible, wearable, personalized computing
The advent of artificial intelligence, machine learning and the internet of things is expected to change modern electronics. The pressing question for many researchers is how to handle this technological revolution. Brain-inspired electronics with organic memristors could offer a functionally promising and cost- effective platform. Since memristors are functionally analogous to the operation of neurons, the computing units in the brain, they are optimal candidates for brain-inspired computing platforms. (2020-04-21)

Untwisting plastics for charging internet-of-things devices
Scientists are unraveling the properties of electricity-conducting plastics so they can be used in future energy-harvesting devices. (2020-04-16)

Applying mathematics to accelerate predictions for capturing fusion energy
PPPL scientists have borrowed a technique from applied mathematics to rapidly predict the behavior of fusion plasma at a much-reduced computational cost. (2020-04-15)

New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)

Even bacteria need their space: Squished cells may shut down photosynthesis
Introverts take heart: When cells, like some people, get too squished, they can go into defense mode, even shutting down photosynthesis. (2020-03-23)

Electric jolt to carbon makes better water purifier
Nanocarbons for purifying water get a lot more efficient by exposing a precursor mixture to high voltage. (2020-03-21)

IKBFU Physicists keep improving 'smart' composites for biomedical sensors
The new composites are related to the multiferroic-class materials which have mutually controlled magnetic and electric properties. The effects observed in the compositions are considered to be a perspective platform for creating new devices from energy converters to highly sensitive sensors. (2020-03-10)

Inverse design software automates design process for optical, nanophotonic structures
Stanford University researchers created an inverse design codebase called SPINS that can help researchers explore different design methodologies to find fabricable optical and nanophotonic structures. In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, Logan Su and colleagues review inverse design's potential for optical and nanophotonic structures, as well as present and explain how to use their own inverse design codebase. (2020-03-10)

On eve of Super Tuesday, study sheds light on how people make choices
A new study taps into mathematics to probe how people make fraught choices, such as which candidate to vote for in an election. (2020-03-02)

Speak math, not code
Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport. (2020-03-01)

Unraveling turbulence
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) may have identified a fundamental mechanism by which turbulence develops by smashing vortex rings head-on into each other, recording the results with ultra-high-resolution cameras, and reconstructing the collision dynamics using a 3D visualization program. Coupled with the analysis of numerical simulations performed by collaborators at the University of Houston and ENS de Lyon, the researchers have gained unprecedented insight into how fluidic systems transform from order to disorder. (2020-02-28)

Scientists develop algorithm for researching evolution of species with WGD
An international team of scientists from ITMO University and George Washington University (USA) created an algorithm for studying the evolutionary history of species with whole-genome duplications, chiefly yeast and plants. The program can be used to analyze the genetic information about these species and make conclusions on how whole-genome duplication took place and why it secured a foothold in the process of evolution. The article was published in Oxford Bioinformatics, one of the leading titles in the field of Computer Science. (2020-02-25)

Harnessing the domino effect for deployable structures
A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have harnessed the domino effect to design deployable systems that expand quickly with a small push and are stable and locked into place after deployment. (2020-02-10)

Drones can determine the shape of a room by listening
In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Algebra and Geometry, Mireille Boutin and Gregor Kemper attempt to reconstruct the shape of a room using first-order echoes received by four microphones attached to a drone. (2020-02-06)

Pioneering SFU research customizes vaccines to reduce bacterial disease
The invention of vaccines for disease prevention is often cited as one of the miracles of modern medicine. New research from Simon Fraser University suggests that tailoring vaccines based on geography and other factors could substantially reduce overall rates of bacterial disease. (2020-02-03)

French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani honoured with a new orb-weaver
Considered as one of the best studied spiders, the orb-weavers remain poorly known in the central parts of the Palearctic ecozone. Hence, an international research team took to the Caucasus, Middle East and Central Asia. Their article in the open-access peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys documents three new to science species, where one is named after the Indo-Iranian god of light Mithra. Another carries the name of the flamboyant French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani. (2020-02-03)

Ozone-depleting substances caused half of late 20th-century Arctic warming, says study
A study examines the greenhouse warming effects of ozone-depleting substances and finds that they caused about a third of all global warming from 1955 to 2005, and half of Arctic warming and sea ice loss during that period. (2020-01-20)

Laser diode emits deep UV light
Nagoya University researchers say they have designed a laser diode that emits the shortest-wavelength ultraviolet light to-date, with potential applications in disinfection, dermatology, and DNA analyses. (2020-01-18)

Math that feels good
Mathematics and science Braille textbooks are expensive and require an enormous effort to produce -- until now. A team of researchers has developed a method for easily creating textbooks in Braille, with an initial focus on math textbooks. The new process is made possible by a new authoring system which serves as a 'universal translator' for textbook formats. Based on this new method, the production of Braille textbooks will become easy, inexpensive, and widespread. (2020-01-16)

New algorithm predicts gestational diabetes
Timely prediction may help prevent the condition using nutritional and lifestyle changes. (2020-01-15)

Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity
Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent. (2020-01-15)

Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test
Mathematicians from the University of York have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses. (2020-01-09)

Indeterminist physics for an open world
Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world. Yet our day-to-day experience is struck by this deterministic vision of the world. A physicist (UNIGE) has been analyzing the classical mathematical language used in modern physics. He has thrown light on a contradiction between the equations that explained the phenomena and the finite world. He suggests making changes to the mathematical language to allow randomness and indeterminism to become part of classical physics. (2020-01-07)

A new method for boosting the learning of mathematics
How can mathematics learning in primary school be facilitated? UNIGE has developed an intervention to promote the learning of math in school. Named ACE-ArithmEcole, the program is designed to help schoolchildren surpass their intuitions and rely instead on the use of arithmetic principles. More than half (50.5%) of the students who took part in the intervention were able to solve difficult problems, as compared to 29.8% for pupils who followed the standard course of study. (2019-12-23)

Discovering a new fundamental underwater force
A team of mathematicians from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Brown University has discovered a new phenomenon that generates a fluidic force capable of moving and binding particles immersed in density-layered fluids. (2019-12-20)

Advances in the characterization of high dynamic range or HDR images
A set of techniques used in image processing that allow better viewing between the lighter and darker areas of an image. A study by Raquel Gil Rodríguez, Javier Vázquez-Corral and Marcelo Bertalmío, researchers of the Image Processing for Enhanced Cinematography (IP4EC) research group. (2019-12-20)

Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees
The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. A team of scientists led by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a method that can be used to model the wide range of synchronization behaviors exhibited by different tree species simply by changing the control parameters. (2019-12-19)

Emotion concepts are not the same worldwide
Fear, anger, sadness -- while it is often assumed these emotion concepts are the same the world over, new research suggests there is greater cross-cultural variation in 'how people think about emotions than is widely assumed', contributor Dr. Joseph Watts says. (2019-12-19)

'I will do my very best!' Children who engage in positive self-talk about effort can boost their math achievement
Children who think poorly of themselves often underachieve in school. A new Dutch study tested whether a simple mental activity -- having children with low self-confidence say favorable, encouraging words to themselves -- could boost their achievement. The study found that children who engaged in this kind of self-talk improved their math performance when the talk focused on effort, not ability. (2019-12-17)

Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows
A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement. (2019-12-15)

Researchers develop first mathematical proof for key law of turbulence in fluid mechanics
Turbulence is one of the least understood phenomena of the physical world. Long considered too hard to understand and predict mathematically, turbulence is the reason the Navier-Stokes equations, which describe how fluids flow, are so hard to solve that there is a million-dollar reward for anyone who can prove them mathematically. But now, University of Maryland mathematicians have broken through the barrier and developed the first rigorous mathematical proof for a fundamental law of turbulence. (2019-12-11)

Consider soil in fall-applied ammonia rates, Illinois study says
Fall-applied anhydrous ammonia may not fulfill as much of corn's nitrogen needs as previously assumed. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the effectiveness of the practice depends on the soil. (2019-12-09)

Analyzing seismic patterns to forecast the magnitude of the largest earthquake aftershocks
Earthquakes can have devastating impacts on communities all around the world. Associate Professor Jiancang Zhuang and Emeritus Professor Yosihiko Ogata from The Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM) in Japan, in collaboration with colleagues, have developed a method that can forecast the probability of when and where aftershocks are likely to occur, and how strong the largest of these will be. Their findings were published on Sept. 6, 2019, in Nature Communications. (2019-12-01)

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