Current Aquaculture News and Events

Current Aquaculture News and Events, Aquaculture News Articles.
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Garlic and selenium increase stress resistance in carps, says a RUDN University biologist
A biologist from RUDN University confirmed that selenium nanoparticles and garlic extract can effectively reduce the negative impact of stress on the health of grass carp in the breeding industry. (2021-02-04)

Algorithm for algal rhythms
Red Sea atlas of algal blooms reveals the need for more sustainable fish farming. (2021-01-31)

Genetic rewiring behind spectacular evolutionary explosion in East Africa
Genetic rewiring could have driven an evolutionary explosion in the shapes, sizes and adaptations of cichlid fish, in East Africa's answer to Darwin's Galapagos finches. (2021-01-19)

Scientists to global policymakers: Treat fish as food to help solve world hunger
Fish provide 17% of the animal protein consumed globally and are rich in micronutrients and essential fatty acids. In Ambio experts argue seeing fish in a food system perspective. (2021-01-19)

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture. (2021-01-15)

US fishing and seafood industries saw broad declines last summer due to COVID-19
The US fishing and seafood sector years generated more than $200 billion in annual sales and supported 1.7 million jobs in recent years. It experienced broad declines in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 public health crisis, according to a new NOAA Fisheries analysis released today. (2021-01-15)

Study identifies immune response biomarkers, novel pathways in four marine mollusc species
A new study involving the University of Maine assessed immune responses in four economically important marine mollusc species -- the blue mussel, soft-shell clam, Eastern oyster, and Atlantic jackknife clam -- and identified new biomarkers relating to changes in protein function involved in novel regulatory mechanisms of important metabolic and immunological pathways. (2021-01-12)

The parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium infects marine crustaceans
The parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium infects marine crustaceans https://doi.org/10.1007/s42995-020-00061-z Announcing a new publication for Marine Life Science & Technology journal. In this review article the authors Caiwen Li, Meng Li and Qian Huang from Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, China consider the impact of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium on aquaculture of marine crustaceans in China. (2021-01-10)

'hail to the queen' - saving the Caribbean queen conch
Second only to the spiny lobster, the queen conch is a prized delicacy long harvested for food and is revered for its beautiful shell. Conch populations have dwindled so low, creating a dire and urgent situation in ecological and economic terms. To preserve this significant molluscan fishery in the Caribbean, the world's leading expert on queen conch aquaculture has published an 80-page, step-by-step user manual that provides complete illustrations and photos of how to culture and restore the queen conch. (2021-01-07)

Seafood strategies
The ''Executive Order on Promoting American Seafood Competitiveness and Economic Growth,'' issued by the Trump administration in May 2020, lays out a plan to expand the U.S. seafood industry, especially aquaculture, and enhance American seafood competitiveness in the global market. (2021-01-07)

Scientists need to understand how gill development limits fish growth
The distribution and concentration of dissolved oxygen and water temperature in the oceans and freshwaters are usually far more influential in shaping the growth and reproduction of fish than the distribution of their prey. (2021-01-06)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Hibiscus reduces the toxicity of ammonia for rainbow trout, say RUDN University biologists
A team of biologists from RUDN University developed a hibiscus-based dietary supplement for trout that makes the fish less sensitive to ammonia pollution and more stress-resistant. (2020-12-07)

UN to issue first-ever global report on harmful algal blooms
A seven-year analysis of almost 10,000 Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) events worldwide over three decades will be published by the HAB Programme of UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission. More than 100 scientists in 112 countries contributed to the synthesis and analysis of HAB data gathered from 1985 to 2018 -- a first-ever big data approach to detecting changes in the costly phenomenon's global distribution, frequency, and intensity. (2020-11-30)

Shocks to seafood
The United States' seafood industry declined precipitously in the months following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and research shows that targeted federal assistance will be necessary to bring it back. (2020-11-23)

Research breakthrough achieves fish-free aquaculture feed that raises key standards
After six years of research, a team of scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz has developed a cost-effective new aquaculture feed that eliminates conventional fish meal and fish oil ingredients while also providing better fish weight gain and higher nutritional value in the filet for humans. The new fish-free feed is the first to demonstrate across-the-board gains in sustainability, performance, economic viability, and human health. (2020-11-12)

Decaying jellyfish blooms can cause temporary changes to water column food webs
Decaying jellyfish blooms fuel the rapid growth of just a few specific strains of seawater bacteria, causing temporary changes to the water column food web. This is the finding of a new study furthering our understanding of how jellyfish blooms, which are happening with increasing frequency, impact marine ecosystems. It details these fast-growing bacteria effectively reduce the amount of jellyfish detrital material reaching the seafloor, keeping it instead within the water column food web. (2020-10-30)

Smart solution to detect seafood spoilage
Existing methods for detecting seafood spoilage are far from satisfactory for ensuring food safety and security. To solve this problem, Flinders University researchers have constructed and tested a solid-state fluorescent sensor loaded on filter papers that can instantly and accurately measure the rate of spoilage in Atlantic salmon - and can easily be applied to other seafood. (2020-10-28)

The future of krill
Although the krill catch is regulated, caution is required to avoid endangering the population itself and the species that depend on it, warns a group of krill experts headed by Prof. Dr. Bettina Meyer from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in the journal Communications Earth & Environment - Nature. (2020-10-16)

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder. The study is reported in this month's JCI Insight. (2020-10-15)

For red abalone, resisting ocean acidification starts with mom
Red abalone mothers from California's North Coast give their offspring an energy boost when they're born that helps them better withstand ocean acidification compared to their captive, farmed counterparts, according to a study from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California, Davis. (2020-10-05)

Laundry lint can cause significant tissue damage within marine mussels
Research by the University of Plymouth showed that ingesting lint caused significant abnormality within the mussels' gills, as well as atrophy or deformities leading to loss of definition in digestive tubules (2020-10-02)

New research sheds light on the reluctance of farmers to adopt new technologies
Research from the University of Kent's School of Economics sheds new light on a long-standing obstacle to improving agricultural productivity in developing countries: the reluctance of small-scale farmers to adopt modern technologies because of the risks associated with them. (2020-10-01)

Wels catfish genome assembled
By deciphering the genetic code of the barbelled giant, scientists expect to better understand the secrets of the wels catfish's exceptionally rapid growth, enormous appetite and longevity. (2020-09-22)

Better communication helps translate molecular tools
Multi-stakeholder collaboration is key for the adoption of molecular approaches that can facilitate accurate, cheaper and faster monitoring of marine ecosystems. (2020-09-16)

Tryptophan supports guts health on trouts under stress, says a RUDN biologist
A biologist from RUDN University found the most beneficial concentration of tryptophan for rainbow trout. When added to the diet of the fish, this amino acid supports the immune system and reduces the oxidative stress in the intestinal tract caused by the overpopulation of fish farms. The results of the study were published in the Aquaculture magazine. (2020-09-03)

NYUAD study finds gene targets to combat microorganisms binding to underwater surfaces
A group of synthetic biologists at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) have identified new genetic targets that could lead to safe, biologically-based approaches to combat marine biofouling - the process of sea-based microorganisms, plants, or algae binding to underwater surfaces. (2020-09-01)

How weather affects crawfish harvests
To help inform farmers, researchers at Louisiana State University are the first to quantify how rainfall and temperature affect crawfish harvest yields. (2020-08-31)

Humans' construction 'footprint' on ocean quantified for first time
In a world-first, the extent of human development in oceans has been mapped. An area totalling approximately 30,000 square kilometres - the equivalent of 0.008 percent of the ocean - has been modified by human construction, a study led by Dr Ana Bugnot from the University of Sydney School of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science has found. (2020-08-31)

New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades. (2020-08-28)

New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Exposure to imidacloprid, an agricultural insecticide, at environmentally-relevant concentrations in food or water, leaves both crustaceans and molluscs vulnerable to insecticides, weakening their immune system and leaving them susceptible to disease. (2020-08-24)

NASA study maps the roots of global mangrove loss
Using high-resolution data from the joint NASA-U.S. Geological Survey Landsat program, researchers have created the first map of the causes of change in global mangrove habitats between 2000 and 2016 - a valuable tool to aid conservation efforts for these vital coastline defenders. (2020-08-18)

Desert greenhouses offer growth opportunities
Efficient greenhouse complexes that will grow crops using the resources available on desert coasts could improve food security for millions. (2020-08-17)

'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses -- and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say. (2020-08-13)

How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries. (2020-08-10)

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oyster
n October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Researchers from the German Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), confirm in a publication in Marine Biodiversity, that they have found the shell-borer in oysters near Sylt and Texel and that it has arrived in European waters. (2020-08-06)

A framework for the future
As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. In 2020 seafood consumption reached an all-time high, with an average of 20kg consumed annually by every person on the planet. (2020-08-03)

Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior
Researchers are the first to characterize the ecology and fine-scale habitat use of 'near threatened' whitespotted eagle rays in Florida while also identifying areas of potential interactions between this species and multiple environmental threats. Biotelemetry provided unique insights into this species' occupancy, which is not apparent at the landscape-scale. Prolonged observations showed affinities for habitats of considerable recreational and commercial importance, like inlets, channels, and clam aquaculture lease sites close to shore. (2020-07-22)

Good news: European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue
Laboratory study: AWI researchers gave young European see bass feed laced with microplastic for months, but found virtually no microplastic particles in the fish fillets. (2020-07-20)

Study first to show tiger sharks' travels and desired hangouts in the Gulf of Mexico
From 2010 to 2018, scientists tagged 56 tiger sharks of varying life stages to track their movements via satellite. Movement patterns varied by life stage, sex, and season. Some of their core habitats overlapped with locations designated by NOAA as Habitat Areas of Particular Concern and also were found near 2,504 oil and gas platforms. Findings may help inform studies into potential climate change, oil spills, and other environmental impacts on tiger shark movement in the Gulf of Mexico. (2020-07-15)

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