Current Archaeologist News and Events

Current Archaeologist News and Events, Archaeologist News Articles.
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What did the Swiss eat during the Bronze Age?
People living at the Bronze Age faced a series of challenges: climate, opening up of trade and population growth. How did they respond to changes in their diet? UNIGE and UPF have carried out isotopic analyses on skeletons together with plant remains. They discovered that manure use had become widespread over time to improve crop harvests in response to demographic growth. They also found that there had been a radical change in dietary habits. (2021-02-02)

Ancient DNA sheds light on the peopling of the Mariana Islands
Compared to the first peopling of Polynesia, the settlement of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, which happened around 3,500 years ago, has received little attention. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the Australian National University and the University of Guam have now obtained answers to long debated questions regarding the origin of the first colonizers of the Marianas and their relationship to the people who initially settled in Polynesia. (2020-12-22)

Study finds 5 distinct dog types from 11,000 years ago
An international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor has studied the lineage of dogs and found that there were at least five different types of dogs as far back as 11,000 years ago. (2020-10-29)

New evidence found of the ritual significance of a classic Maya sweat bath in Guatemala
An unusual offering in an abandoned and unique-looking Maya sweat bath revealed new evidence of the role it played in the community (2020-10-19)

Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry -- unique discovery in Baltic sea wreck from 1495
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: A two-metre-long Atlantic sturgeon. The well-preserved fish remains were found in a wreck on the bottom of the Baltic Sea last year, and species identification was made possible through DNA analysis. (2020-08-27)

New neural network differentiates Middle and Late Stone Age toolkits
The change from Middle Stone Age (MSA) to Later Stone Age (LSA) marks a major cultural change amongst our hunter-gatherer ancestors, but distinguishing between these two industrial complexes is not straightforward. New research published by a team from the University of Liverpool and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History this week demonstrates how machine learning can provide a valuable tool for archaeologists, and can identify what differentiates the MSA and LSA. (2020-08-26)

29,000 years of Aboriginal history
The known timeline of the Aboriginal occupation of South Australia's Riverland region has been vastly extended by new research led by Flinders University in collaboration with the River Murray and Mallee Aboriginal Corporation (RMMAC). Radiocarbon dating of shell middens - remnants of meals eaten long ago - capture a record of Aboriginal occupation that extends to around 29,000 years, confirming the location as one of the oldest sites along the 2500km river to become the oldest River Murray Indigenous site in South Australia. (2020-07-14)

Information technology played key role in growth of ancient civilizations
A new paper in Nature Communications shows the ability to store and process information was as critical to the growth of early human societies as it is today. (2020-05-27)

'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703. (2020-05-13)

Ancient mantis-man petroglyph discovered in Iran
A rare rock carving of an insect found in the Teymareh site of Central Iran has been jointly described by a team of entomologists and archaeologists in a paper now published in the open access Journal of Orthoptera Research. The petroglyph shows a six-limbed creature with the head and arms of a praying mantis, but with two circles at its sides, similarly to the famous ''squatter man'' petroglyph found at several locations around the world. (2020-03-16)

Tang Dynasty noblewoman buried with her donkeys, for the love of polo
A noblewoman from Imperial China enjoyed playing polo on donkeys so much she had her steeds buried with her so she could keep doing it in the afterlife, archaeologists found. This discovery by a team that includes archaeologist Fiona Marshall at Washington University in St. Louis is published March 17 in the journal Antiquity. (2020-03-16)

Neanderthal migration
At least two different groups of Neanderthals lived in Southern Siberia and an international team of researchers including scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that one of these groups migrated from Eastern Europe. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-03-04)

Old Irish 'clachan' found in South Australia
The oldest known Australian example of a communal type of Irish settlement has been 'unearthed' in a dusty paddock in rural South Australia. An extensive geophysical study of the Baker's Flat Irish settlement site near Kapunda has found the first -- and possibly largest -- clachan in Australia, says Flinders archaeologist Susan Arthure. (2020-02-16)

Anthropologists confirm existence of specialized sheep-hunting camp in prehistoric Lebanon
Anthropologists at the University of Toronto have confirmed the existence more than 10,000 years ago of a hunting camp in the mountains along the modern-day border between Lebanon and Syria -- one that straddles the period marking the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural settlements at the onset of the last stone age. Analysis of decades-old data collected from Nachcharini Cave shows it was a short-term hunting camp and that sheep were the primary game. (2020-01-22)

Rare find: human teeth used as jewellery in Turkey 8,500 years ago
At a prehistoric archaeological site in Turkey, researchers have discovered two 8,500-year-old human teeth, which had been used as pendants in a necklace or bracelet. Researchers have never documented this practice before in the prehistoric Near East, and the rarity of the find suggests that the human teeth were imbued with profound symbolic meaning for the people who wore them. (2019-12-13)

Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. (2019-11-26)

Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk
Mongolia's Tsaatan reindeer herders depend on munkh mus, or eternal ice, for their livelihoods. Now, soaring global temperatures may threaten that existence. (2019-11-20)

Cretan tomb's location may have strengthened territorial claim
Examining the position occupied by tombs in their landscape in Prepalatial Crete gives us new insights into the role played by burial sites, mortuary practices and the deceased in the living society. (2019-10-09)

Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals
Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about megafaunal extinction and enabling insights into ecosystems and species-specific responses to climate change and human activities. (2019-10-02)

Traditional fisherfolk help uncover ancient fish preservation methods
Archaeologists have little insight into the methods used for the long-term processing and preservation of fish in the past. A study of traditional fish preparation employed by fisherfolk in Panama and Egypt, revealed patterns of modifications to the fishes' skeletons which are comparable to those found among fish remains recovered in archaeological sites (2019-09-24)

Inequality: What we've learned from the 'Robots of the late Neolithic'
Seven thousand years ago, societies across Eurasia began to show signs of lasting divisions between haves and have-nots. In new research published in the journal Antiquity, scientists chart the precipitous surge of prehistoric inequality and trace its economic origins back to the adoption of ox-drawn plows. (2019-09-18)

Livestock bones help date the earliest spread of millet grains outside China
New research from Washington University in St. Louis and Kiel University in Germany uses DNA from the skeletal remains of sheep and goats to show that animals first domesticated in the Near East had reached eastern Kazakhstan by 2700 BC, and that these animals were fed millet grain first domesticated in China to help them survive harsh winters. (2019-09-04)

New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought
Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought. (2019-08-30)

Busy older stars outpace stellar youngsters, new study shows
The oldest stars in our Galaxy are also the busiest, moving more rapidly than their younger counterparts in and out of the disk of the Milky Way, according to new analysis carried out at the University of Birmingham. (2019-08-28)

Food may have been scarce in Chaco Canyon
Chaco Canyon, a site that was once central to the lives of precolonial peoples called Anasazi, may not have been able to produce enough food to sustain its estimated population numbers. (2019-07-10)

More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos
Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1,000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead. (2019-06-06)

Archaeological discovery upends a piece of Barbados history
Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived in 1627 to encounter what they thought was a herd of wild European pigs. A Simon Fraser University researcher is shedding new light on the mystery and the altering of New World environments. (2019-05-16)

Traces of crawling in Italian cave give clues to ancient humans' social behavior
Evidence of crawling in an Italian cave system sheds new light on how late Stone Age humans behaved as a group, especially when exploring new grounds, says a study published today in eLife. (2019-05-14)

Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy
An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Despite being killed brutally, the victims were buried carefully. Ancient DNA has revealed the mass murder to be that of a large family. The new research results shed light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory of which little is known. The study has just been published in the American journal PNAS. (2019-05-10)

Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
In a new paper, 'Essential Excavation Experts: Alienation and Agency in the History of Archaeological Labor,' published in Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, archaeologist AllisonMickel illuminates the ways that nineteenth century archaeologists working in the Middle East managed local labor in ways that reflected capitalist labor management models. Her analysis also reveals how much archaeological knowledge production has fundamentally relied upon site workers' active choices in responding to labor conditions. (2019-04-22)

Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans
The work, published in Scientific Reports, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration (2019-03-20)

There's a place for us: New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems
In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 1:30 and 3:30 PM respectively, a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists will present the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time. (2019-02-17)

ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. (2018-11-11)

What happened in the past when the climate changed?
New research shows for the first time how the changing climate in Asia, from 5,000 to 1,000 years ago, transformed people's ability to produce food in particular places. The model enables the co-authors to get at the causes of some dramatic historic and cultural changes. (2018-10-31)

Violence in pre-Columbian Panama exaggerated, new study shows
An oft-cited publication said a pre-Colombian archaeological site in Panama showed signs of extreme violence. A new review of the evidence strongly suggests that the interpretation was wrong. (2018-09-24)

Cornell research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark -- calling into question historical timelines. (2018-06-05)

Ancient human remains and a mystery unearthed by ANU archaeologist
ANU Archaeologist Dr Catherine Frieman unearths and intact 4,000 year old human cremation in clay pottery urn on Cornish site she discovered by accident. (2018-05-17)

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost history
Nearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. Cargo recovered from the ocean floor -- including the equivalent to a 'Made in China' label on a piece of pottery -- is helping archaeologists reevaluate when the ship went down and how it fits in with China's history. (2018-05-16)

ANU archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow site
Untouched Bronze-Age burial mound discovered by chance by ANU Archaeologist, Dr. Catherine Frieman. She will begin a 14-day archaeological dig on Easter Saturday to examine the site. (2018-03-28)

Picasso's plans to build the world's tallest concrete sculpture uncovered in Florida
Pablo Picasso's plans to build a 100-foot sculpture for the University of South Florida in Tampa are uncovered along with a recorded interview with famed collaborator Carl Nesjar and architectural drawings by world famous architect Paul Rudolph. (2018-02-28)

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