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Current Archaeologists News and Events, Archaeologists News Articles.
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A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost history
Nearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. (2018-05-16)
Archaeologists uncover earliest evidence for equid bit wear in the ancient Near East
Achaeologists have uncovered the earliest example of the use of a bridle bit with an equid (horse family) in the Near East. (2018-05-16)
78,000 year cave record from East Africa shows early cultural innovations
A project led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has excavated the Panga ya Saidi cave site, in the coastal hinterland of Kenya. (2018-05-09)
New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across Asia
A new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. (2018-05-09)
Kenyan cave sheds new light on dawn of modern man
Forty-eight thousand year-old crayons and shell beads were among a treasure trove of items unearthed by archaeologists at a cave in Kenya. (2018-05-09)
Scientists can measure population change through chemicals found in feces
Fecal stanols -- organic molecules -- located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes, according to new research by faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-05-08)
Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million people
Parts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows. (2018-03-27)
Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years ago
During the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden received skilful female artisans, who had learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. (2018-03-22)
Historians to climate researchers: Let's talk
Ours is not the first society to be confronted by massive environmental change. (2018-03-19)
Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migration
Small scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool. (2018-03-19)
Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study reveals
They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was. (2018-03-13)
Archaeology: Pots, people and knowledge transfer
In the Late Neolithic, a new style of pottery appears among the grave goods buried with the dead in many parts of Europe. (2018-02-22)
Copper Age Iberians 'exported' their culture -- but not their genes -- all over Europe
Prehistoric Iberians 'exported' their culture throughout Europe, reaching Great Britain, Sicily, Poland and all over central Europe in general. (2018-02-21)
Ancient-DNA researchers surpass the 1,000-genome milestone
In the last eight years, the field of ancient DNA research has expanded from just one ancient human genome to more than 1,300. (2018-02-21)
Laser technology takes Maya archeologists where they've never gone before
With the help of airborne laser mapping technology, a team of archeologists, led by UA professor Takeshi Inomata, is exploring on a larger scale than ever before the history and spread of settlement at the ancient Maya site of Ceibal in Guatemala. (2018-02-21)
Micro to macro mapping -- Observing past landscapes via remote-sensing
New multi-scale relief modelling algorithm helps archaeologists rediscover topographical features of the past. (2018-02-08)
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. (2018-02-02)
Scandinavians shaped by several waves of immigration
So you think people in present-day Sweden and Norway are different from each other? (2018-02-01)
Ancient lake reveals a colorful past
Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork. (2018-01-26)
Cheops' pyramid: Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber?
A recent exploration has shown the presence of a significant void in the pyramid of Khufu at Giza. (2018-01-11)
Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road?
Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. (2018-01-04)
Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history
An archaeologist from The Australian National University is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine. (2018-01-03)
Are bones discovered under an Exeter street from the first turkey dinner in England?
Bones dug up from under an Exeter street may be the remains of the first ever turkey dinner in England, archaeologists believe. (2017-12-19)
Human societies evolve along similar paths
Societies ranging from ancient Rome and the Inca empire to modern Britain and China have evolved along similar paths, a huge new study shows. (2017-12-18)
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). (2017-12-15)
Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discovered
A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. (2017-11-06)
The relentless rise of migration in Europe over last 10,000 years
Three major pulses of increased mobility in Europe over the last 10,000 years and a general upward trend in migration have been uncovered in a new study led by researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and King's College London. (2017-10-30)
Research sheds new light on early turquoise mining in Southwest
Researchers are blending archaeology and geochemistry to get a more complete picture of turquoise's mining and distribution in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. (2017-10-18)
Amazon farmers discovered the secret of domesticating wild rice 4,000 years ago
Amazonian farmers discovered how to manipulate wild rice so the plants could provide more food 4,000 years ago, long before Europeans colonized America, archaeologists have discovered. (2017-10-09)
Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages
In the Middle Ages, did contracting leprosy necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? (2017-10-03)
Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan
Archaeologists examining plant impressions within broken pottery have discovered the earliest evidence for domesticated sorghum in Africa. (2017-09-27)
How aerial thermal imagery is revolutionizing archaeology
A Dartmouth-led study has demonstrated how the latest aerial thermal imagery is transforming archaeology due to advancements in technology. (2017-09-24)
Wild sheep grazed in the Black Desert 14,500 years ago
Excavations of architecture and associated deposits left by hunter-gatherers in the Black Desert in eastern Jordan have revealed bones from wild sheep -- a species previously not identified in this area in the Late Pleistocene. (2017-08-22)
Archaeologists uncover ancient trading network in Vietnam
A team of archaeologists from The Australian National University has uncovered a vast trading network which operated in Vietnam from around 4,500 years ago up until around 3,000 years ago. (2017-08-17)
Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population's power in 16th century
An innovative study published today in the journal Science Advances demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions. (2017-08-09)
Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean origins
DNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. (2017-08-02)
Algorithms identify the dynamics of prehistoric social networks in the Balkans
The pioneering application of modularity analyses in archaeology yields a powerful method for highly accurate mapping of social interaction in the human past. (2017-07-27)
Present-day Lebanese descend from Biblical Canaanites, genetic study suggests
In the most recent whole-genome study of ancient remains from the Near East, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. (2017-07-27)
Archaeologists find key to tracking ancient wheat in frozen Bronze Age box
A Bronze Age wooden container found in an ice patch at 2,650m in the Swiss Alps could help archaeologists shed new light on the spread and exploitation of cereal grains following a chance discovery. (2017-07-26)
Cultural flexibility was key for early humans to survive extreme dry periods in southern Africa
The early human techno-tradition, known as Howiesons Poort, associated with Homo sapiens who lived in southern Africa about 66,000 to 59,000 years ago indicates that during this period of pronounced aridification they developed cultural innovations that allowed them to significantly enlarge the range of environments they occupied. (2017-07-26)
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