Current Archaeology News and Events

Current Archaeology News and Events, Archaeology News Articles.
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Changing livestock in ancient Europe reflect political shifts
In ancient European settlements, livestock use was likely primarily determined by political structure and market demands, according to a study published February 17, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ariadna Nieto-Espinet and colleagues of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Barcelona. (2021-02-17)

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs
Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian PhDs have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities. (2021-02-11)

Study suggests environmental factors had a role in the evolution of human tolerance
Environmental pressures may have led humans to become more tolerant and friendly towards each other as the need to share food and raw materials became mutually beneficial, a new study suggests. (2021-02-03)

What did the Swiss eat during the Bronze Age?
People living at the Bronze Age faced a series of challenges: climate, opening up of trade and population growth. How did they respond to changes in their diet? UNIGE and UPF have carried out isotopic analyses on skeletons together with plant remains. They discovered that manure use had become widespread over time to improve crop harvests in response to demographic growth. They also found that there had been a radical change in dietary habits. (2021-02-02)

Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
Changes in Western European burial practices spread rapidly during the 6th - 8th centuries AD, providing strong evidence that early Medieval Europe was a well-connected place with a shared culture. (2021-01-21)

Early humans used chopping tools to break animal bones and consume the bone marrow
- Using advanced scientific methods, researchers from Tel Aviv University found that stone tools of the type known as 'chopping tools' were used to break open the bones of animals. - The researchers: ''The bones must be broken neatly in two, which requires great skill and precision''. - Tools of this type were used for over two million years. They were found in large quantities at prehistoric sites all over the Old World, but no one understood their exact function. (2021-01-20)

A new archaeology for the Anthropocene era
Scantily clad tomb raiders and cloistered scholars piecing together old pots - these are the kinds of stereotypes of archaeology that dominate public perception. Yet archaeology in the new millennium is a world away from these images. In a major new report, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History probe a thoroughly modern and scientific discipline to understand how it is helping to address the considerable challenges of the Anthropocene. (2021-01-18)

Ancient DNA analysis reveals Asian migration and plague
Ancient DNA reveals a history of migrations, continuity, and diseases in northeastern Asia. (2021-01-07)

Evidence for a massive paleo-tsunami at ancient Tel Dor, Israel
Underwater excavation, borehole drilling, and modelling suggests a massive paleo-tsunami struck near the ancient settlement of Tel Dor between 9,910 to 9,290 years ago, according to a study published December 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gilad Shtienberg, Richard Norris and Thomas Levy from the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology, San Diego CA, USA, and colleagues from Utah State University and the University of Haifa. (2020-12-23)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

First exhaustive review of fossils recovered from Iberian archaeological sites
The Iberian Peninsula has one of the richest paleontological records in Western Europe. However,''there were generally only scarce indications of the collection and use of fossils at Iberian sites during Prehistory, and thus the documentation of this behaviour presented an anomalous situation compared to other regions of Europe, where numerous studies have been published on this practice. (2020-11-24)

Population dynamics and the rise of empires in Inner Asia
In a new study published in Cell, researchers seek to understand the genetic, sociopolitical and cultural changes surrounding the formation of the eastern Eurasian Steppe's historic empires. The study analyzes genome-wide data for 214 ancient individuals spanning 6,000 years and discusses the genetic and cultural changes that preceded the rise of the Xiongnu and Mongol nomadic pastoralist empires. (2020-11-05)

Bronze Age travel routes revealed using pioneering research method
Archaeologists from the University of Sydney have reconstructed the ancient seasonal migration routes of Bronze Age herders in Xinjiang, north-western China. Published in the high-ranking journal PLOS ONE, their research was the result of innovative methodology. To determine snow cover and vegetation cycles, crucial to the survival of Bronze Age people and their flocks, they examined both satellite imagery and archaeological evidence, as well as interviewing modern-day herders. (2020-11-04)

Denisovan DNA in the genome of early East Asians
Researchers analyzed the genome of the oldest human fossil found in Mongolia to date and show that the 34,000-year-old woman inherited around 25 percent of her DNA from western Eurasians, demonstrating that people moved across the Eurasian continent shortly after it had first been settled by the ancestors of present-day populations. This individual and a 40,000-year-old individual from China also carried DNA from Denisovans, an extinct form of hominins that inhabited Asia before modern humans arrived. (2020-10-29)

Anglo-Saxon warlord found by detectorists could redraw map of post-Roman Britain
A discovery by a metal detectorist on club outing proved to be a significant burial with the remains of an imposing warlord, along with well-preserved weapons and items. (2020-10-04)

Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread - 4000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife. (2020-09-21)

To recreate ancient recipes, check out the vestiges of clay pots
UC Berkeley archaeologists have discovered that unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of not just the last supper cooked, but earlier meals as well, opening a window onto gastronomic practices possibly going back millennia. (2020-09-11)

Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
In a new study published in The Holocene, researchers from the Max Planck Society in Jena together with Saudi and international collaborators, present the first detailed study of 'mustatil' stone structures in the Arabian Desert. These are vast structures made of stone piled into rectangles, which are some of the oldest large-scale structures in the world. They give insights into how early pastoralists survived in the challenging landscapes of semi-arid Arabia. (2020-08-25)

Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard
Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects. (2020-08-12)

Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
Archaeologists at The Australian National University have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait. The research is led by a First Australian author. His work makes a statement that goes beyond academia. (2020-08-11)

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave
A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago - 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas. Excavations of Chiquihuite Cave, located in a mountainous area in northern Mexico controlled by drugs cartels, uncovered nearly 2000 stone tools from a small section of the high-altitude cave. Analysis of the sediment in the cave uncovered a new story of the colonisation of the Americas. (2020-07-22)

Rewriting history: New evidence challenges Euro-centric narrative of early colonization
ew research from Washington University in St. Louis provides evidence that Indigenous people continued to live in southeastern US and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Spanish explorers in the 1500s. (2020-07-15)

29,000 years of Aboriginal history
The known timeline of the Aboriginal occupation of South Australia's Riverland region has been vastly extended by new research led by Flinders University in collaboration with the River Murray and Mallee Aboriginal Corporation (RMMAC). Radiocarbon dating of shell middens - remnants of meals eaten long ago - capture a record of Aboriginal occupation that extends to around 29,000 years, confirming the location as one of the oldest sites along the 2500km river to become the oldest River Murray Indigenous site in South Australia. (2020-07-14)

New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass
Archaeological glass contains information about the movement of goods and ancient economies, yet the understanding of critical aspects of the ancient glass industry is fragmentary. Until now, it has been challenging to scientifically determine the origin of the colourless and clear glass, which was particularly favoured by the Romans. The Romans distinguished between two types of clear glass: Alexandrian and Levantine. Now researchers have found a way to localize the furnaces of the two types. (2020-07-09)

First confirmed underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites found off Australian coast
Ancient submerged Aboriginal archaeological sites await underwater rediscovery off the coast of Australia, according to a study published July 1, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jonathan Benjamin of Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia and colleagues. (2020-07-01)

Aboriginal artifacts reveal first ancient underwater cultural sites in Australia
The first underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites have been discovered off northwest Australia dating back thousands of years ago when the current seabed was dry land. Aboriginal artefacts discovered off the Plibara coast in Western Australia were discovered through a series of archaeological and geophysical surveys in the Dampier Archipelago, as part of the Deep History of Sea Country Project, funded through the Australian Research Council's Discovery Project Scheme. (2020-07-01)

Ancient genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland. (2020-06-04)

Human mobility and Western Asia's early state-level societies
The regions of Anatolia, the Northern Levant and the Caucasus played important roles in the development of complex social and cultural models during the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age. Through genomic analysis of 110 individuals ranging from 7500 to 3000 years ago, this study sheds light on how human mobility accompanied the spread of ideas and material culture prior to and during the emergence of some of the world's earliest state-level societies. (2020-05-28)

Material and genetic resemblance in the Bronze Age Southern Levant
Different 'Canaanite' people from the Bronze Age Southern Levant not only culturally, but also genetically resemble each other more than other populations. A team around Ron Pinhasi from the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology found in a recent study that their DNA is a mixture of two populations: The Chalcolithic Zagros and Early Bronze Age Caucasus. The results have been published in ''Cell''. (2020-05-28)

7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris)1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago. (2020-05-25)

Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict -- including a swastika symbol -- discovered in Aboriginal rock art. The engravings studied in 188 engravings in a remote South Australian rockshelter are a stark reminder of colonial invasion and the strife brewing in Europe ahead of World War Two, Flinders University archaeologists have revealed. (2020-05-18)

Global cooling event 4,200 years ago spurred rice's evolution, spread across asia
A major global cooling event that occurred 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, an international team of researchers has found. (2020-05-15)

Researchers trace evolution of self-control
Advances in the craftsmanship of stone hand axes around 500,000 years ago suggest individuals at this time possessed characteristics which demonstrate significant self-control, such as concentration and frustration tolerance. (2020-05-13)

Study sheds light on unique culinary traditions of prehistoric hunter-gatherers
A new study suggests the culinary tastes of ancient people were not solely dictated by the foods available in a particular area, but also influenced by the traditions and habits of cultural groups. (2020-04-21)

Papua New Guinea highland research redates Neolithic period
A new report published in Science Advances on the emergence of agriculture in highland Papua New Guinea shows advancements often associated with a later Neolithic period occurred about 1,000 years' earlier than previously thought. (2020-04-17)

Neanderthal cord weaver
Contrary to popular belief, Neanderthals were no less technologically advanced than Homo sapiens. An international team, including researchers from the CNRS, have discovered the first evidence of cord making, dating back more than 40,000 years, on a flint fragment from the prehistoric site of Abri du Maras in the south of France. (2020-04-09)

Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
A team from University of Bristol developed a new method to date archaeological pottery using fat residues remaining in the pot wall from cooking. The method means prehistoric pottery can be dated with remarkable accuracy, sometimes to the window of a human life span. Pottery found in Shoreditch, London proven to be 5,500 years old and shows the vibrant urban area was once used by established farmers who ate cow, sheep and goat dairy products as a central part of their diet. (2020-04-08)

Well-engineered 'watercourts' stored live fish, fueling Florida's Calusa kingdom
Fishing powered the mighty Calusa, who ruled South Florida for centuries. Now, a new study shows how sophisticatedly engineered 'watercourts' served as holding pens for live fish, sustaining Calusa population growth and large-scale construction projects. (2020-03-30)

Aboriginal scars from frontier wars
Hundreds of Aboriginal men who became native mounted police in colonial Australia carried a significant burden of responsibility for law and order for white settlers in Queensland and other settlements. A long-running ARC-funded archaeology project has turned the lens on the recruitment to the Queensland Native Mounted Police and their part in the violent 'frontier wars' - which created long-term traumatic impacts on the lives of the Indigenous people involved. (2020-03-18)

Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events
A new paper led by Cornell University points out the need for an important new refinement to the technique. The outcomes of his study, published March 18 in Science Advances, have relevance for understanding key dates in Mediterranean history and prehistory, including the tomb of Tutankhamen and a controversial but important volcanic eruption on the Greek island of Santorini. (2020-03-18)

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