Current Arctic Ocean News and Events | Page 2

Current Arctic Ocean News and Events, Arctic Ocean News Articles.
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Geologists produce new timeline of Earth's Paleozoic climate changes
MIT geologists have produced a new timeline of Earth's Paleozoic climate changes. The record shows ancient temperature variations coinciding with shifts in planet's biodiversity. (2021-02-01)

Arctic shrubs add new piece to ecological puzzle
A 15-year experiment on Arctic shrubs in Greenland lends new understanding to an enduring ecological puzzle: How do species with similar needs and life histories occur together at large scales while excluding each other at small scales? Its findings also reveal trends related to carbon sequestration and climate change as the Arctic becomes both greener and browner. (2021-02-01)

A surprising cycle
Hydrocarbons and petroleum are almost synonymous in environmental science. After all, oil reserves account for nearly all the hydrocarbons we encounter. But the few hydrocarbons that trace their origin to biological sources may play a larger ecological role than scientists originally suspected. (2021-02-01)

Tsunamis and tsunami warning: recent progress and future prospects
There have been frequent tsunamis since the 21st century, drawing the attention of many countries on the study of tsunami mechanism and warning. Tsunami records also play an essential role in deriving earthquake rupture models in subduction zones. A recent paper reviews the recent progress and limitations of tsunami research, from the aspects of tsunami generation, propagation, inversion and warning. Potential tsunami warning strategies are discussed and future prospects on tsunami research are provided. (2021-02-01)

Arctic warming and diminishing sea ice are influencing the atmosphere
Researchers of the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth system research at the University of Helsinki have resolved for the first time, how the environment affects the formation of nanoparticles in the Arctic. The results give additional insight into the future of melting sea ice and the Arctic atmosphere. Until recent studies, the molecular processes of particle formation in the high Arctic remained a mystery. (2021-01-29)

Synthesizing valuable chemicals from contaminated soil
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and ETH Zurich have developed a process to produce commodity chemicals in a much less hazardous way than was previously possible. In the current issue of Science, the researchers report that they have been able to utilize electrolysis, i.e., the application of an electric current, to obtain chemicals known as dichloro and dibromo compounds, which can then be used to synthesize commodity chemicals. (2021-01-29)

Reconstruction shows increased global warming trends since 1850s
To better understand how temperatures have increased, an international team led by researchers at Sun Yat-Sen University in China has released a newly merged global surface temperature dataset, including reconstructed land and marine measurements from the 1850s to 2018. The study provides evidence that there was a consistent increased warming trend compared with previous estimations. (2021-01-28)

Research illuminates lobsters' genetic response to changing climate
The American lobster, which supports the most valuable fishery in North America, may be more susceptible to climate change than previously thought. Studies of the early life stages of lobsters have concluded that ocean acidification, compared to warming, had limited impact on growth and metabolism. According to new research, their genes tell a different story, which could help anticipate the long-term effects of climate change for one the nation's most precious natural resources. (2021-01-28)

Marine heatwaves becoming more intense, more frequent
When thick, the surface layer of the ocean acts as a buffer to extreme marine heating--but a new study from the University of Colorado Boulder shows this ''mixed layer'' is becoming shallower each year. The thinner it becomes, the easier it is to warm. The new work could explain recent extreme marine heatwaves, and point at a future of more frequent and destructive ocean warming events as global temperatures continue to climb. (2021-01-28)

Arctic ocean expedition advances climate modeling
In-situ cloud, radiation, and surface energy budget data collected by a September 2014 expedition of the Japanese Research Vessel Mirai from a stationary point in the ice-free Arctic Ocean were used to investigate the skill of regional climate models. Although most near-surface meteorological parameters were adequately captured by most models, certain important discrepancies were identified, such as the failure to capture unstable low-level cloud stratification, and the partitioning of ice clouds and liquid clouds. (2021-01-26)

Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska
PhD candidate Ellie Broadman of Northern Arizona University's School of Earth and Sustainability developed and led a study in Arctic Alaska to investigate sea ice dynamics and their impact on circulation and precipitation patterns in Arctic Alaska on a long-term basis. She is the lead author on a paper detailing her team's findings, ''Coupled impacts of sea ice variability and North Pacific atmospheric circulation on Holocene hydroclimate in Arctic Alaska,'' recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-25)

Global ice loss increases at record rate
The rate at which ice is disappearing across the planet is speeding up, according to new research. And the findings also reveal that the Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017 - equivalent to a sheet of ice 100 metres thick covering the whole of the UK. (2021-01-25)

Nuclear war could trigger big El Niño and decrease seafood
A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy - at least in the equatorial Pacific. (2021-01-25)

How will seafarers fare once automated ships take over? Scientists predict the future
Researchers from the Korea Maritime and Ocean University show that automation in the shipping industry will lead to an overall increase in shore-based jobs. However, they warn that this will have to be complemented with concerted policy measures to provide the necessary technical training to job seekers and veteran seafarers who will need to adapt to the new technological paradigm. (2021-01-25)

Increasing ocean temperature threatens Greenland's ice sheet
Scientists at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have for the first time quantified how warming coastal waters are impacting individual glaciers in Greenland's fjords. Their work, the subject of a recent Science Advances study, can help climate scientists better predict global sea level rise from the increased melting. (2021-01-25)

A large number of gray whales are starving and dying in the eastern North Pacific
It is now the third year that gray whales have been found in very poor condition or dead in large numbers along the west coast of Mexico, USA and Canada, and scientist have raised their concerns. An international study published this week in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, led by Aarhus University researcher Dr Fredrik Christiansen, suggests that starvation is contributing to these mortalities. (2021-01-22)

Shift in caribou movements may be tied to human activity
Human activities might have shifted the movement of caribou in and near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, according to scientists who tracked them using isotopic analysis from shed antlers. The study is timely given the auction this year of oil and gas leases in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Indigenous Alaskans opposed the leases, arguing development could disrupt the migration of caribou they depend on for sustenance. (2021-01-22)

Climate and carbon cycle trends of the past 50 million years reconciled
In a study published today in Science Advances, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa oceanographers fully reconciled climate and carbon cycle trends of the past 50 million years--solving a controversy debated in the scientific literature for decades. (2021-01-22)

Fish sex organs boosted under high-CO2
Research from Australia has found that some species of fish will have higher reproductive capacity because of larger sex organs, under the more acidic oceans of the future. (2021-01-21)

Antarctica: the ocean cools at the surface but warms up at depth
Scientists from the CNRS, CNES, IRD, Sorbonne Université, l'Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier and their Australian colleagues, with the support of the IPEV, have concluded that the slight cooling observed at the surface of the Southern Ocean hides a rapid and marked warming of the waters, to a depth of up to 800 metres. These results were obtained thanks to unique data acquired over the past 25 years. (2021-01-21)

Acidification impedes shell development of plankton off the US West Coast
Results from a 2016 research cruise show ocean acidification has interfered with shell development of zooplankton that are a critical part of the marine food web. (2021-01-19)

No insect crisis in the Arctic - yet
No insect crisis in the Arctic - yet. Climate change is more pronounced in the Arctic than anywhere else on the planet, raising concerns about the ability of wildlife to cope with the new conditions. A new study shows that rare insects are declining, suggesting that climatic changes may favour common species. (2021-01-18)

Changing resilience of oceans to climate change
Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests. (2021-01-15)

Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched increased their biodiversity and complexity, showing that they can recover if CO2 emissions are significantly reduced. (2021-01-15)

Scientists offer road map to improve environmental observations in the Indian Ocean
A group of more than 60 scientists have provided recommendations to improve the Indian Ocean Observing System (IndOOS), a basin-wide monitoring system to better understand the impacts of human. (2021-01-15)

Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies researchers, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st century, needing the prompt implementation of adaptation measures for anthropogenic global warming. (2021-01-14)

Scientists discover the secret of Galápagos' rich ecosystem
New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats. (2021-01-14)

Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation. (2021-01-14)

Upper ocean temperatures hit record high in 2020
The ocean temperatures continued a trend of breaking records in 2020. A new study, authored by 20 scientists from 13 institutes around the world, reported the highest ocean temperatures since 1955 from surface level to a depth of 2,000 meters. (2021-01-13)

Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth. (2021-01-13)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominate ocean economy
Dubbed the 'Ocean 100', the group of companies generated US$1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to the research published in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-13)

Taking the lab into the ocean: A fleet of robots tracks and monitors microbial communities
A new paper describes how researchers at MBARI, the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa), and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, enabled a trio of self-driving robots to locate, follow, and sample a layer of oceanic microbes as they drifted in an open-ocean eddy north of the Hawaiian islands. (2021-01-13)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations. Dubbed the ''Ocean 100'' by researchers at Duke University and Stockholm University, these ''blue economy'' companies collectively generated $1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. If the group were a country, it would have the world's 16th-largest economy, roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product (GDP) of Mexico. (2021-01-13)

Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response. (2021-01-13)

600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans. (2021-01-13)

Future too warm for baby sharks
As climate change causes the world's oceans to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in. (2021-01-12)

New study of Earth's crust shows global growth spurt three billion years ago
Curtin University researchers have used ancient crystals from eroded rocks found in stream sediments in Greenland to successfully test the theory that portions of Earth's ancient crust acted as 'seeds' from which later generations of crust grew. (2021-01-12)

Study finds future too warm for baby sharks
A new study conducted at the New England Aquarium finds that as climate change causes the ocean to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished, and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in. (2021-01-12)

A bucket of water can reveal climate change impacts on marine life in the Arctic
We know very little about marine life in the Arctic. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, are trying to change that. They have shown that a simple water sample makes it possible to monitor the presence, migration patterns and genetic diversity of bowhead whales in an otherwise hard-to-reach area. The method can be used to understand how climate changes and human activities impact life in the oceans. (2021-01-12)

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of new developments in the Arctic ice, and this tool provides a faster solution. (2021-01-12)

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