Current Arctic Ocean News and Events | Page 24

Current Arctic Ocean News and Events, Arctic Ocean News Articles.
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Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide
2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe. (2019-04-18)

Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish
A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past. (2019-04-18)

Lessons learnt from the drift analysis of MH370 debris
The Boeing 777 of Malaysia Airlines (MH370) has been missing for over five years. The extensive, costly, but unsuccessful search operations have stopped. A European research consortium under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research Kiel has helped by providing insights on the most probable crash site based on debris from the aircraft. In a new study, scientists synthesise what they have learnt and propose strategies for optimising future interdisciplinary work of this kind. (2019-04-17)

New research offers solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage
Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. It's well established that carbon in the atmosphere is absorbed by phytoplankton and transported to the ocean floor as the microscopic organisms die and sink by gravity through the water. (2019-04-17)

Balancing the ocean carbon budget
How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? The answer to this question will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario. (2019-04-17)

Study finds white sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present
New research from Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner institutions published in Nature Scientific Reports challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The research team documented encounters between white sharks and orcas at Southeast Farallon Island off California. In every case examined by the researchers, white sharks fled the island when orcas arrived and didn't return there until the following season. Elephant seal colonies in the Farallones also indirectly benefited from the interactions. (2019-04-16)

What Earth's gravity reveals about climate change
On March 17, 2002, the satellite duo GRACE was launched to map the Earth's gravity field more precisely than ever before. The measurements make it possible to monitor the terrestrial water cycle, the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers or changes in sea levels. This helps to better understand important trends in the global climate system. A review in the journal Nature Climate Change now presents the mission highlights in climate research. (2019-04-16)

Climate engineering needs to look at the big picture, says researcher
Climate engineering research is too focused on specific aspects of individual projects, argues Nadine Mengis. She believes broader studies about the impacts of these efforts will have on other Earth system variables (2019-04-16)

NASA study verifies global warming trends
A new study by researchers from NASA has verified the accuracy of recent global warming figures. The team used measurements of the 'skin' temperature of the Earth taken by a satellite-based infrared measurement system called AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder) from 2003 to 2017. They compared these with station-based analyses of surface air temperature anomalies -- principally the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP). (2019-04-16)

North Atlantic warming hole impacts jet stream
The North Atlantic warming hole (NAWH), a region of reduced warming located in the North Atlantic Ocean, significantly affects the North Atlantic jet stream in climate simulations of the future, according to a team of researchers. (2019-04-15)

Thunderstorms half a world away significantly contribute to heat waves in central California
Scientists reveal links between unusually strong tropical convection and extreme California heat waves. (2019-04-12)

Predicting heat waves? Look half a world away
When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days. (2019-04-12)

The trouble with thaw
A recent study shows that nitrous oxide emissions from thawing Alaskan permafrost are about twelve times higher than previously assumed. About one fourth of the Northern Hemisphere is covered in permafrost, which is thawing at an increasing rate. As temperatures increase, the peat releases more and more greenhouse gases. And, even though researchers are monitoring carbon dioxide and methane, no one seems to be watching the most potent greenhouse gas: nitrous oxide. (2019-04-12)

Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science
Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean. (2019-04-11)

Measuring iceberg production with earthquakes
An international team led by French researchers from the CNRS and Paris Diderot University came up with the idea of using earthquakes generated when icebergs break away -- felt hundreds of kilometres off -- to measure this ice loss. This breakthrough in environmental seismology has made it possible to quantify Greenland glacial shrinkage through calving between 1993 and 2013. (2019-04-11)

Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench
Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean -- the Mariana Trench. Until now, scientists knew more about Mars than the deepest part of the ocean. But an expedition to collect samples of the microbial population at the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (some 11,000 meters down) has revealed a new 'oil-eating' bacteria. (2019-04-11)

When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals
Climate change is increasing the likelihood of extreme winter rain events in the Arctic. These kinds of winter storms on Norway's Svalbard archipelago can cause a thick cap of ice to cover the forage that reindeer eat. You'd think that more frequent rain-on-snow events would spell the end for these arctic animals -- but you'd be wrong. (2019-04-08)

Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers
A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. Scientists have long suspected that this was connected to the slowdown of a key Atlantic Ocean current system that today once again is slowing. A new study of sediments from the Atlantic bottom directly links this slowdown with a massive buildup of carbon dragged from the air into the abyss. (2019-04-08)

Renewables are a better investment than carbon capture for tackling climate change
Solar panels and wind turbines coupled with energy storage offer a better hope for tackling climate change than trying to capture carbon from fossil fuel power stations, according to new research published by Nature Energy. New research shows that resources that would be spent on developing and installing carbon capture technologies would be better invested in creating more solar panels and wind turbines and focusing on developing energy storage options to support these instead. (2019-04-08)

Air temperatures in the Arctic are driving system change
A new paper shows that air temperature is the 'smoking gun' behind climate change in the Arctic. (2019-04-07)

study looks to iron from microbes for climate help
Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. The paper proposes a novel way to provide iron to large areas of the ocean, 30 percent of which is poor in the essential element. (2019-04-03)

The Transpolar Drift is faltering -- sea ice is now melting before it can leave the nursery
The dramatic loss of ice in the Arctic is influencing sea-ice transport across the Arctic Ocean. As experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research report in a new study, today only 20 percent of the sea ice that forms in the shallow Russian marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean actually reaches the Central Arctic, where it joins the Transpolar Drift; the remaining 80 percent of the young ice melts before it has a chance to leave its 'nursery.' (2019-04-02)

New species of wood-munching (and phallic-looking) clams found at the bottom of the ocean
Wood-boring clams are tiny clams that eat (and live in) sunken wood at the bottom of the ocean, and they have long, tube-shaped organs that they use to breathe called siphons sticking out of their shells. Scientists have just updated the wood-boring clam family tree, adding a new species and three new genus groups. They're all pretty.... phallic-looking. (2019-04-02)

Beware a glacier's tongue
Glaciers extending into freshwater lakes can form long, submerged terraces that menacingly rise above the surface when icy chunks fall into the water. (2019-04-02)

Academic journal Polar Science features polar science in India
The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) published a special issue 'Recent advances in climate science of polar region (to commemorate the contributions of late Dr. S.Z. Qasim, a pioneering doyen of the Indian polar programme)' in the comprehensive academic journal Polar Science. In this issue, 23 articles on polar science primarily by Indian researchers were published. Additionally, a message was sent from Narendra Modi, the honorable Prime Minister of India. (2019-04-02)

Marine protected reserves do more than restore fish
In a new analysis of the effectiveness of marine protected areas worldwide, University of Massachusetts Amherst marine ecologist Brian Cheng and colleagues report that reserves not only replenish target fish populations, they also restore ecological functioning. However, not all reserves performed equally well. (2019-04-01)

First-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine dinosaur found on Alaska's North Slope
Paleontologists from Hokkaido University in Japan, in cooperation with paleontologists from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, Texas, have discovered the first-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine (crested 'duck-billed' dinosaur) from the Arctic -- part of the skull of a lambeosaurine dinosaur from the Liscomb Bonebed (71-68 Ma) found on Alaska's North Slope. The discovery proves for the first time that lambeosaurines inhabited the Arctic during the Late Cretaceous. See paper in Scientific Reports. (2019-03-29)

In ancient oceans that resembled our own, oxygen loss triggered mass extinction
Researchers provide first conclusive evidence linking widespread ocean oxygen loss and rising sea levels to a 430-million-year-old mass extinction event. (2019-03-28)

Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers
Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research from Carnegie ecologists. Their work is the first-ever investigation of the interactions between plastic microfibers and sea anemones, which are closely related to corals. (2019-03-28)

Winds of change...Solar variability weakens the Walker cell
An international team of researchers has found robust evidence for signatures of the 11-year sunspot cycle in the tropical Pacific. They analyzed historical time series of pressure, surface winds, and precipitation with focus on the Walker Circulation -- a vast system of atmospheric flow in the tropical Pacific region that affects patterns of tropical rainfall. They have revealed that during periods of increased solar irradiance, the trade winds weaken and the Walker circulation shifts eastwards. (2019-03-28)

Study shows arctic warming contributes to drought
According to new research involving a University of Wyoming scientist, changes similar to those after the ice age 10,000 years ago could be in store today because a warming Arctic weakens the temperature difference between the tropics and the poles. This, in turn, results in less precipitation, weaker cyclones and weaker mid-latitude westerly wind flow -- a recipe for prolonged drought. (2019-03-27)

Tracing the process of nitrous oxide formation in the ocean
26 March 2019/Kiel. Nitrogen is an essential element for both the life on land and in the oceans. Moreover, it affects the climate of Earth. However, many factors in the nitrogen cycle are not yet known or sufficiently understood. Marine chemists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now for the first time been able to measure a direct indicator of a key process of the nitrogen cycle in the ocean. (2019-03-26)

Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed
Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey. (2019-03-25)

Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms
A new study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent. (2019-03-25)

Researchers unveil effects of dust particles on cloud properties
An international team led by Japanese scientists has generated significant findings that highlight the impact of high-latitude dusts on the conversion of clouds' water droplets to ice -- or glaciation -- within low-level clouds in the Arctic region. These results contribute to a better understanding of factors at the land surface and how they affect cloud formations. (2019-03-25)

Colonization in slow motion
There is a wide variety of animals living on the Arctic seabed. Attached to rocks, they feed by removing nutrients from the water using filters or tentacles. But it can take decades for these colonies to become established, and they probably don't achieve their natural diversity until much later. (2019-03-22)

Alpine tundra releases long-frozen CO2 to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate warming
Thawing permafrost in high-altitude mountain ecosystems may be a stealthy, underexplored contributor to atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. (2019-03-21)

Changes in ocean 'conveyor belt' foretold abrupt climate changes by four centuries
In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant 'conveyor belt' carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate. Evidence increasingly suggests that this system is slowing down, and some scientists fear it could have major effects. A new study published in Nature Communications provides insight into how quickly such changes could take effect if the system continues weakening. (2019-03-20)

Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2019 wintertime extent reached on March 13 ties with 2007's as the 7th smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA. (2019-03-20)

The INBIS channel: the most complete submarine cartography
A scientific study describes for the first time the submarine cartography of a high-latitude system in the IBIS channel, which covers tens of kilometres in the northern western area of the Barents Sea, in the Arctic Ocean. This channel is one of the few submarine valleys in polar latitudes that kept its geological architecture during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). (2019-03-20)

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