Current Arctic Ocean News and Events | Page 25

Current Arctic Ocean News and Events, Arctic Ocean News Articles.
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Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans
A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring. (2019-03-19)

New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities
Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study. (2019-03-18)

NASA sees development of Tropical Depression 03W near Yap
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed 03W that formed near the island of Yap in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. (2019-03-15)

Ocean sink for man-made CO2 measured
An international research project led by scientists from ETH Zurich has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean between 1994 and 2007. (2019-03-14)

Narwhals spend at least half time diving for food, can fast for several days after meal
Narwhals -- enigmatic arctic whales known for their sword-like tusk -- spend over half their time diving to find food but are also able to last up to three days without a meal, according to a study by Manh Cuong NgĂ´ and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-03-14)

How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. (2019-03-13)

Tunas, sharks and ships at sea
Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap -- a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas. (2019-03-13)

Researchers discover new nitrogen source in Arctic
Scientists have revealed that the partnership between an alga and bacteria is making the essential element nitrogen newly available in the Arctic Ocean. The microbial process of 'nitrogen fixation' converts the element into a form that organisms can use, and was discovered recently in the frigid polar waters. This shift may be a result of climate change and could affect global chemical cycles, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-03-11)

Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean
Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life. (2019-03-11)

Southern Ocean acidification puts marine organisms at risk
New research co-authored by University of Alaska indicates that acidification of the Southern Ocean will cause a layer of water to form below the surface that corrodes the shells of some sea snails. (2019-03-11)

Research connects dots among ocean dynamics, drought and forests
The study found predictable, traceable connections between changes in how the Atlantic Ocean flowed and operated with centuries-long droughts and changes in forest makeup. (2019-03-11)

Small animals with big impact
Copepods, the world's most common animal, release unique substances into the oceans. Concentrations of these substances are high enough to affect the marine food web, according to new research from the University of Gothenburg. The studies also show that phytoplankton in the oceans detect the special scent of copepods and do their utmost to avoid being eaten. (2019-03-08)

Atmospheric scientists reveal the effect of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming
Analyses indicate that Arctic amplification would not slow down until the 22nd and 23rd centuries. The sea ice loss is causing the rapid warming in the Arctic. (2019-03-08)

What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?
A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds. (2019-03-07)

Scientists reveal Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent weak biases in ocean models
The Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent is not well simulated in many ocean models because of its complex dynamics. A research team led by IAP scientists found the surface wind stress and its curl is the most important forcing term for correctly simulating the NECC in ocean models. (2019-03-06)

NASA's infrared vision reveals Tropical Cyclone Haleh's power
Tropical Cyclone Haleh maintained an eye as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and collected temperature information on the storm and the ocean waters it was moving through. (2019-03-05)

Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments
Researchers find a Florida-specific strain of red-tide causing algae thrives in both high and low CO2 concentrations. (2019-03-04)

New research from Arctic: Thawing permafrost peatlands may add to atmospheric CO2 burden
A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Montreal, in cooperation with researchers from various Nordic research institutions, finds that peatlands may strengthen the permafrost-carbon feedback by adding to the atmospheric CO2 burden post-thaw. (2019-03-01)

Reduced salinity of seawater wreaks havoc on coral chemistry
New research confirms that drastic changes in ocean salinity from, for example, severe freshwater flooding, as recently experienced off the coast of north-east Queensland from abnormal monsoonal conditions, provoke a similar stress response in corals as extreme heating, resulting in 'freshwater bleaching' and if unabated, coral death. (2019-02-28)

Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts
New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. (2019-02-28)

Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, Rutgers-led study finds
Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today. (2019-02-28)

For the fisheries of the future, some species are in hot water
Some fisheries may falter while others could become more productive as the world's waters continue to warm, according to a new study, which looks to the productivity of fisheries in the past to help predict the impact of climate change on future fisheries. (2019-02-28)

Warm seas scatter fish
Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. But climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin this major source of food. (2019-02-28)

Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions
The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study. (2019-02-27)

Unprecedented biological changes in the global ocean
Current monitoring of marine biological systems only covers a tiny fraction of the ocean, which limits our ability to confidently predict the expected effects of climate disturbances on marine biodiversity. Using a new computer model, an international team led by the CNRS and involving, in France, researchers from Sorbonne University has demonstrated that biological changes are accelerating, which has consequences for our use of marine resources. Their findings are published in Nature Climate Change. (2019-02-25)

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds
Computer modeling shows that marine stratus clouds could disappear if atmospheric CO2 levels climb high enough, raising global temperatures. (2019-02-25)

Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history
A research team led by scientists at Arizona State University has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized (2019-02-25)

Scientists reveal impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen discharge on nitrogen transport in global rivers
Scientists found that riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen in the USA has increased primarily due to the use of nitrogen fertilizers. In contrast, European rivers were affected mainly by point source pollution. However, both aspects are equally important for aquatic environments in China. (2019-02-22)

The ancient people in the high-latitude Arctic had well-developed trade
Russian scientists studied the Zhokhov site of ancient people, which is located in the high-latitude Arctic, and described in detail the way of life of the ancient people had lived there. It turned out that, despite the sparsely populated area, the ancient people had communicated with representatives of other territories and had even exchanged various objects with them through some kind of the fairs. (2019-02-22)

Simulated ocean mesoscale structures induce air-sea interaction
Using the Community Earth System Model framework, the authors build a very high-resolution quasi-global coupled model by coupling an eddy-resolving quasi-global ocean model with a high-resolution atmospheric model. The model is successfully run for six years under present climate conditions, and the simulations are evaluated against observational and reanalysis data. The model is capable of simulating large-scale oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns, sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, oceanic eddy kinetic energy, and fine-scale structures of surface winds. (2019-02-20)

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a US team from Baylor University. (2019-02-20)

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. (2019-02-20)

Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands
One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory -- that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at lower elevations. (2019-02-20)

Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation
Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in the ocean's coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide uptake, a new Duke-led study shows. The findings -- based on thousands of samples collected in the western North Atlantic -- upend prevailing theories about where and when nitrogen fixation occurs, and underscore the need for scientists to revisit the global distribution of marine nitrogen fixation and reevaluate its role in the coastal carbon cycle. (2019-02-20)

Ocean acidification harms cod larvae more than previously thought
The Atlantic cod is one of the most important commercial fish species in the world. Recent studies have shown that ocean acidification threatens the early life stages of this species. So far it was hoped that at least the larvae that survive might be more robust and therefore may aid in the adaptation of this population. A new paper, which has been published by scientists from GEOMAR in the journal Global Change Biology, suggests otherwise. (2019-02-19)

NASA-NOAA satellite sees powerful Tropical Cyclone Oma affecting New Caledonia
Tropical Cyclone Oma appeared well-organized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Southern Pacific Ocean, just northwest of New Caledonia. (2019-02-19)

Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness
Paleontologists working on a steep river bank in Alaska have discovered fossil evidence of the northernmost marsupial known to science. (2019-02-19)

Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant
Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new MIT study finds. (2019-02-18)

Newly discovered marsupial lived among Arctic dinosaurs
A research team has discovered a previously unknown species of marsupial that lived in Alaska's Arctic during the era of dinosaurs, adding a vivid new detail to a complex ancient landscape. The thumb-sized animal, named Unnuakomys hutchisoni, lived in the Arctic about 69 million years ago during the late Cretaceous Period. (2019-02-18)

Predicting climate change
Thomas Crowther, ETH Zurich identifies long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world. In his AAAS session, Crowther describes how such an effort, could absorb as much as 135 gigatons of atmospheric carbon. Crowther will also describe data from thousands of soil samples collected by local scientists that reveal the world's most abundant population of soil organisms in arctic and sub-arctic regions and the most dominant populations of plants and animals in tropical regions. (2019-02-16)

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