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Current Arctic News and Events, Arctic News Articles.
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Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
An international team of scientists from EPFL, the Paul Scherrer Institute and Stockholm University has identified a novel driver of new aerosol particle formation in the Arctic during the summer to fall transition. The authors show that iodic acid is important for forming new particles which subsequently influence the formation of clouds and their radiative effect over the Arctic pack ice. (2020-10-01)

Ice discharge in the North Pacific set off series of climate events during last ice age
Repeated catastrophic ice discharges from western North America into the North Pacific contributed to, and perhaps triggered, hemispheric-scale changes in the Earth's climate during the last ice age. (2020-10-01)

Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem. (2020-09-29)

In the arctic, extreme air pollution kills trees, limits growth by reducing sunlight
At the most heavily polluted site on Earth, dendroecology, dendrochemistry, and process-based forward modelling were used to explore the relationship of tree growth and mortality with industrial pollution. (2020-09-29)

Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation
Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation, a new study shows. Conducting the study in North West Siberia, the researchers found that tundra vegetation regenerated rapidly after a major landslide event in 1989. Two decades later, differences in the vegetation of the landslide area and the areas surrounding it have evened out, but even after 30 years, the vegetation of the landslide area is nowhere close to the vegetation of the surrounding areas. (2020-09-28)

The Arctic is burning in a whole new way
'Zombie fires' and burning of fire-resistant vegetation are new features driving Arctic fires -- with strong consequences for the global climate -- warn international fire scientists in a commentary published in Nature Geoscience. (2020-09-28)

Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought
The largest-ever study of tree rings from Norilsk in the Russian Arctic has shown that the direct and indirect effects of industrial pollution in the region and beyond are far worse than previously thought. (2020-09-25)

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice
The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s. The bears are experiencing short-term benefits from thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice that allows more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive. (2020-09-23)

Warming temperatures are driving arctic greening
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a new study found the region has become greener, as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth. (2020-09-22)

Global change ecologist leads NASA satellite study of rapid greening across Arctic tundra
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a team of researchers finds the region has become greener as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth. (2020-09-22)

2020 Arctic sea ice minimum at second lowest on record
NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the 2020 minimum extent, which was likely reached on Sept. 15, 2020 measured 1.44 million square miles (3.74 million square kilometers). (2020-09-21)

Sea ice triggered the Little Ice Age, finds a new study
A new study finds a trigger for the Little Ice Age that cooled Europe from the 1300s through mid-1800s, and supports surprising model results suggesting that under the right conditions sudden climate changes can occur spontaneously, without external forcing. (2020-09-17)

Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet. As a result, permafrost that is thousands of years old is now being lost to erosion. As measurements gathered on the Lena River by AWI experts show, the scale of erosion is alarming. (2020-09-16)

Mercury concentrations in Yukon river fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
The concentration of mercury in the fish in Alaska's Yukon River may exceed the EPA's human health criterion by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming are not constrained, according to scientific research funded in part by NASA (2020-09-16)

Mercury concentrations in Yukon River Fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
First of its kind research estimates potential releases of mercury from thawing permafrost in high and low emissions scenarios. The researchers predicts that by 2200, the mercury emitted into the atmosphere annually by thawing permafrost could compare with current global anthropogenic emissions under a high emissions scenario. (2020-09-16)

Arctic transitioning to a new climate state
The fast-warming Arctic has started to transition from a predominantly frozen state into an entirely different climate with significantly less sea ice, warmer temperatures, and more rain, according to a comprehensive new study of Arctic conditions. (2020-09-14)

Climate change recasts the insect communities of the Arctic
Through a unique research collaboration, researchers at the University of Helsinki have exposed major changes taking place in the insect communities of the Arctic. Their study reveals how climate change is affecting small but important predators of other insects, i.e. parasitoids. (2020-09-11)

Heated rivalries for pollinators among arctic plants
Insect pollination is as important to Arctic plants as it is to plants further south. When flowers abound, the plants have to compete for pollinators. Researchers at the University of Helsinki reveal that higher temperatures cause the flowering periods of different plant species to pile up in time. As a consequence, climate change may affect the competitive relationships of plants. (2020-09-11)

Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean. The transport and transformation of freshwater discharge in these seas have a large impact on ice formation, biological productivity, and many other processes in the Arctic. Russian researchers have investigated the spreading of large river plumes -- that is, freshened water masses formed as a result of river runoff mixing with ambient saltwater -- in the Russian Arctic seas. (2020-09-10)

New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA. Specimens had been collected during a 2019 field trip to northeastern Yakutiya (Russia), a ''real blank spot'' in terms of biodiversity research. The unique butterfly is described by Russian scientists in a recent paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Acta Biologica Sibirica. (2020-09-08)

Ancient hunters stayed in frozen Northern Europe rather than migrating to warmer areas, evidence from Arctic fox bones shows
Ancient hunters stayed in the coldest part of Northern Europe rather than migrating to escape freezing winter conditions, archaeologists have found. (2020-09-07)

Indigenous knowledge still undervalued - study
New research has found that Indigenous knowledge is regularly underutilised and misunderstood when making important environmental decisions. (2020-09-03)

The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent, but also in lakes and remote Arctic marine sediments. (2020-09-02)

Latest version of climate system model shows significant improvements in simulation performance
The simulating performance of the latest climate system model FGOALS-f3-L is evaluated and significant improvements are apparent compared with the previous version. (2020-09-02)

Red fox displaces Arctic fox thanks to littering
Red foxes are moving to the mountains to feed on trash along roadsides. This is bad news for the endangered Arctic fox. (2020-09-01)

Knowledge about the past can preserve the biodiversity of tomorrow
Climate change threatens plants and animals across the planet. Interdisciplinary research by, among others, climate and biodiversity researchers at the University of Copenhagen, has mapped responds of biodiversity caused by abrupt climate changes in the past. The findings can be used to protect both individual species and entire ecosystems in the warmer climates of the future and can strengthen effective conservation practice and policy. (2020-08-28)

Sunflower oil shows unexpected efficiency in corrosion prevention
Sunflower oil, which is found in almost every home, can be used not only in cooking, everyday life and cosmetology - it will help avoid complications (gas hydrates and corrosion) during oil and gas production. Scientists of the priority area of Kazan University intend to apply inhibitors developed on its basis in harsh Arctic conditions. (2020-08-28)

New study warns: We have underestimated the pace at which the Arctic is melting
Arctic sea ice is melting more quickly than once assumed. Today's climate models have yet to incorporate the steep rise in temperatures that have occurred over the past 40 years. This, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen and other institutions. (2020-08-26)

How cold was the ice age? Researchers now know
A University of Arizona-led team has nailed down the temperature of the last ice age -- the Last Glacial Maximum of 20,000 years ago - to about 46 degrees Fahrenheit. (2020-08-26)

Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns -- a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans -- have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons. The research team based in Japan published their analysis on May 30 in Marine Biology, a Springer journal. (2020-08-24)

Arctic ocean moorings shed light on winter sea ice loss
The eastern Arctic Ocean's winter ice grew less than half as much as normal during the past decade, due to the growing influence of heat from the ocean's interior, researchers have found. (2020-08-21)

Scientists revealed shifting spring phenology of Arctic tundra with satellite and ground observation
Phenology, the seasonal and interannual dynamics of vegetation, is recognized as an important indicator of ecosystem response to climate change. With stronger warming trend at higher latitudes, the seasonality of vulnerable Arctic tundra is more sensitive. Now researchers in China have investigated the temporal and spatial variations of the spring phenology using multiple remote sensing indices and ground observations, explored the significance and feasibility of different methods applied to different data sources. (2020-08-20)

Abrupt global climate change events occurred synchronously during last glacial period
The abrupt climate warming events that occurred in Greenland during the last glacial period occurred very close in time to other rapid climate change events seen in paleoclimate records from lower latitudes, according to a new study, which reveals a near-synchronous teleconnection of climate events spanning Earth's hemispheres. (2020-08-20)

Past rapid warming levels in the Arctic associated with widespread climate changes
Using Greenland ice cores, new research is the first to confirm the longstanding assumption that climate changes between the tropics and the Arctic were synchronised during the last glacial period. (2020-08-20)

Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects, study shows
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? They will all scavenge from snowshoe hare carcasses under the right conditions, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. And they're not alone. In fact, researchers documented 24 different species feeding from snowshoe hare carcasses in Canada's northern boreal forest. (2020-08-13)

Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean
A Japanese research team observed a new species of polychaetes amid the seafloor materials collected near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. They named it 'Flabelligena Gillet', 2001. (2020-08-12)

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035
A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035. (2020-08-10)

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers
A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant 'warm and wet ancient Mars' hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the red planet. (2020-08-03)

Increasing Arctic freshwater is driven by climate change
New, first-of-its-kind research from the University of Colorado Boulder shows that climate change is driving increasing amounts of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. Within the next few decades, this will lead to increased freshwater moving into the North Atlantic Ocean, which could disrupt ocean currents and affect temperatures in northern Europe. (2020-07-30)

Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. Because the compounds don't break down naturally, they have become environmental contaminants. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into and out of the Arctic Ocean, detecting a newer compound for the first time in Arctic seawater. (2020-07-29)

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