Current Arguing News and Events

Current Arguing News and Events, Arguing News Articles.
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Hide-and-seek can lead to higher drug prices
Pharmaceutical manufacturers and national authorities often negotiate secret rebates when determining drug prices. A UZH study shows that these rebate systems may hamper patient access to drugs. In the medium term, this practice can even lead to increasing drug prices. (2021-02-17)

Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement. (2021-01-13)

Masonic Medical Research Institute studies brown fat: Implications in obesity
The Lin Lab at the MMRI, quantified the number of brown fat cells present in newborn animals. For years, researchers have argued over whether brown fat continues to grow after birth. Dr. Lin and his team have become the first to prove that it does. (2020-12-11)

New definition of sustainability overcomes flaw hampering global transformation efforts
An interdisciplinary team led by Senior Researcher Dr. Christoph Rupprecht (FEAST Project, RIHN) has revealed a new definition of sustainability that expands the concept to non-human species and their needs. The new definition, published in Global Sustainability, addresses a critical flaw in the original concept of sustainability that was hindering global transformation efforts. Examples from landscape planning and the Healthy Urban Microbiome Initiative (HUMI) suggest the new multispecies sustainability concept will have wide-ranging applications. (2020-12-08)

Human intelligence just got less mysterious says Leicester neuroscientist
NEUROSCIENCE EXPERTS from the University of Leicester have released research that breaks with the past fifty years of neuroscientific opinion, arguing that the way we store memories is key to making human intelligence superior to that of animals. (2020-11-05)

Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)

Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform,' expert says
Researchers asked in a viewpoint published in Climatic Change whether heritage sites threatened by climate change should be allowed to adapt and 'transform.' (2020-08-10)

Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review
A literature review by Dr Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado, finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change. (2020-08-06)

Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival. However, Dr Diego Silva, from the University of Sydney, argues this simple utility calculus is unjust because it exacerbates existing social inequities. In a paper published in Chest Journal, Dr Silva proposes a radical departure from current convention by arguing ventilators should be allocated to COVID-19 patients via a lottery. (2020-08-05)

Number of HIV-1 founder variants determined by source partner infection
For people infected by HIV in the subset of cases involving several variants of the virus, and for which disease progression is usually faster, a new modeling study suggests the number of infection-initiating viral variants is primarily determined by how long the source partner has been infected. (2020-07-02)

Ad blockers may benefit websites, users, and the market at large
A new study sought to determine the effect of ad blockers on websites' ability to generate revenue and on users' experiences. The study found that contrary to common assumptions, ad blockers may offer some benefits to companies, users, and the market at large. The findings have implications for how online platforms make decisions about advertising. (2020-06-29)

Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions -- liberalism and realism -- dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Arman Grigoryan, a faculty member in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University has contributed to this debate with a recent article in a top journal, International Security. (2020-05-12)

Often and little, or rarely and to the full?
If we were talking about food, most experts would choose the former, but in the case of energy storage the opposite is true. It turns out that more energy can be stored by charging less often, but right up to 100%. (2020-04-20)

Inequitable medicare reimbursements threaten care of most vulnerable
Hospitals, doctors and Medicare Advantage insurance plans that care for some of the most vulnerable patients are not reimbursed fairly by Medicare, according to recent findings in JAMA. (2020-02-07)

Families give high marks to parenting supports 'for refugees, by refugees,' study finds
A parenting program, developed by Somali and Bhutanese refugees in partnership with Boston College researchers, retained a majority of participants and showed promise reducing reports of childhood depression and family conflict and improving behavior among children, according to findings published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. (2020-01-30)

UMass Amherst researchers identify new mechanism involved in promoting breast cancer
A new approach to studying the effects of two common chemicals used in cosmetics and sunscreens found they can cause DNA damage in breast cells at surprisingly low concentrations, while the same dose did not harm cells without estrogen receptors. (2020-01-15)

New function for potential tumor suppressor in brain development
New research from the group of Simon Hippenmeyer, professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), has now uncovered a novel, opposite role for Cdkn1c. When Cdkn1c is removed only in certain cells of the brain, these cells die, arguing for a new growth promoting role of Cdkn1c. The new research is published today in the journal Nature Communications (2020-01-10)

BU researchers: Pornography is not a 'public health crisis'
Researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have written an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health special February issue arguing against the claim that pornography is a public health crisis, and explaining why such a claim actually endangers the health of the public. (2020-01-09)

Finding common ground for scientists and policymakers on soil carbon and climate change
In an opinion published in Nature Sustainability, a group of scientists argue that public debate about the role of soil carbon in battling climate change is undermining the potential for policymakers to implement policies that build soil carbon for other environmental and agricultural benefits. (2019-11-11)

Rapamycin for longevity -- Opinion article
The scientist discusses several reasons, including fear of the actual and fictional side effects of rapamycin, everolimus and other clinically-approved drugs, arguing that no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today. (2019-10-16)

T. rex used a stiff skull to eat its prey
A Tyrannosaurus rex could bite hard enough to shatter the bones of its prey. But how it accomplished this feat without breaking its own skull bones has baffled paleontologists. That's why scientists at the University of Missouri are arguing that the T. rex's skull was stiff much like the skulls of hyenas and crocodiles, and not flexible like snakes and birds as paleontologists previously thought. (2019-09-25)

Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities
Research from Cass Business School finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities. (2019-09-12)

New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance
Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers. (2019-08-29)

Tech time not to blame for teens' mental health problems
A new study, published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, suggests that the time adolescents are spending on their phones and online is not that bad. The study tracked young adolescents on their smartphones to test whether more time spent using digital technology was linked to worse mental health outcomes. (2019-08-23)

Study: Black students receive fewer warnings from teachers about misbehavior
University of Illinois social work professor Kate Wegmann found in a new study that black middle school students receive fewer warnings from their teachers about misbehavior, giving them fewer opportunities to correct their behavior on their own before the consequences escalate to exclusionary punishments such as office referrals and expulsion. (2019-07-29)

NZ researchers call for gender binary in elite sports to be abandoned
Existing gender categories in sport should perhaps be abandoned in favor of a more 'nuanced' approach in the new transgender era, University of Otago researchers say. (2019-07-22)

Unlocking chemo-resistance in cancer
Associate Professor Hamsa Puthalakath's explanation of why some cancers don't respond to treatment with one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has the potential to lead to: a lab test to check for 5-FU resistance, which would reduce unnecessary chemotherapy treatments; a new drug to turn off 5-FU in resistance; and he finds 5-FU resistance is linked to a the protein 'BOK,' the function of which has stumped scientists for decades. (2019-07-15)

Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity
Listeners can correctly identify whether pairs of screams were produced by the same person or two different people -- a critical prerequisite to individual recognition. (2019-06-24)

New study finds people are using Twitter to bridge political divides
Given the current atmosphere of political polarization, conventional wisdom suggests that conversations about politics -- especially those taking place online -- are both unpleasant and unproductive. However, a new study finds the opposite: average citizens are participating in rich and engaging political conversations online that have the potential to bridge divides and push people beyond their information bubble. This study, 'Why Keep Arguing? Predicting Participation in Political Conversations Online,' was recently published in SAGE Open. (2019-05-13)

Surrey academics weigh into the debate on daylight saving time and school start time
A switch to permanent daylight saving time will undo any positive effects on sleep of delaying school start times, according to researchers from the University of Surrey. (2019-04-22)

Maestro's techniques
Rembrandt van Rijn's paintings are renowned for their masterful representations of light and shadow and a characteristic plasticity generated by a technique called impasto. Now, scientists have analyzed impasto layers in some of Rembrandt's paintings, and the study, which is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reveals that the impasto unexpectedly contains a very rare lead mineral called plumbonacrite. This finding suggests that Rembrandt used a unique paint recipe. (2019-01-30)

Listeners get an idea of the personality of the speaker through his voice
A paper published by Cristina Baus and Albert Costa, UPF researchers at the Center for Cognition and Brain (CBC), in collaboration with researchers from the Université Aix-Marseille and the University of Glasgow, has shown that listeners across languages form very rapid personality impressions from the voice and this is not modulated by the language of the listener, native or foreign. (2019-01-29)

Brits and Germans have very different views on the future of state pensions
Germans think the state always has some role to play in providing state pensions but UK citizens split over how to provide social welfare in the future, according to new research conducted at the University. (2019-01-21)

New Zealand academic offers new explanation for Alexander the Great's death
It may have happened more than 2300 years ago, but the mystery of Alexander the Great's death could finally be solved, thanks to a University of Otago, New Zealand, academic. (2019-01-21)

Fewer monarch butterflies are reaching their overwintering destination
The monarch butterfly is currently experiencing dire problems with its migration in eastern North America. Fewer and fewer monarchs are successfully reaching their overwintering destinations, and scientists aren't sure why. New research published in De Gruyter's Open Access journal Animal Migration, aims to help with this effort. (2019-01-02)

Why polarized politicians can represent citizens best
Do ideologically extreme politicians deemed 'polarized' misrepresent a more moderate populace? According to the article 'The Delegate Paradox: Why Polarized Politicians Can Represent Citizens Best' published in the October 2018 issue The Journal of Politics by Douglas J. Ahler and David E. Broockman, that's not the case. In fact, they argue, enacting campaign finance or election reform to reduce polarization in government would likely degrade the quality of political representation. (2018-10-30)

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available. (2018-10-12)

How Sacred Ibis mummies provided the first test of evolution
A debate over mummified birds brought to France after Napoleon's conquest of Egypt played a central role in delaying acceptance of evolutionary theory; an episode in the history of biology revealed in an Essay published September 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Caitlin Curtis of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, as well as Craig Millar, David Lambert. (2018-09-27)

'Bin chicken' plays unique role in story of evolution
A University of Queensland researcher has uncovered how a French scientist and ibis researcher conducted the first test of evolution more than 50 years before Charles Darwin's Origin of the Species. UQ Centre for Policy Futures researcher Dr. Caitlin Curtis has found that the sacred ibis -- a cousin of the Australian 'bin chicken' -- became central to the history of evolution when several mummified birds were taken from Egypt to France in 1798. (2018-09-27)

Plate tectonics may have been active on Earth since the very beginning
A new study suggests that plate tectonics -- a scientific theory that divides the earth into large chunks of crust that move slowly over hot viscous mantle rock -- could have been active from the planet's very beginning. The new findings defy previous beliefs that tectonic plates were developed over the course of billions of years. (2018-09-26)

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