Current Army News and Events

Current Army News and Events, Army News Articles.
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Army researchers expand study of ethics, artificial intelligence
The Army of the future will involve humans and autonomous machines working together to accomplish the mission. According to Army researchers, this vision will only succeed if artificial intelligence is perceived to be ethical. (2021-02-16)

These shrimplike crustaceans are the fastest snappers in the sea
The snapping claws of male amphipods--tiny, shrimplike crustaceans--are among the fastest and most energetic of any life on Earth. Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 8 find that the crustaceans can repeatedly close their claws in less than 0.01% of a second, generating high-energy water jets and audible pops. The snapping claws are so fast, they almost defy the laws of physics. (2021-02-08)

Tiny crustacean redefines ultra-fast movement
Just the size of a sunflower seed, the amphipod Dulichiella cf. appendiculata wields a giant claw that snaps shut 10,000 times faster than the blink of a human eye. The claw makes up 30% of an adult's body mass and closes with an audible snap, creating water jets and sometimes producing small bubbles due to rapid changes in water pressure, a phenomenon known as cavitation. (With Video and Gifs) (2021-02-08)

New quantum receiver the first to detect entire radio frequency spectrum
A new quantum sensor can analyze the full spectrum of radio frequency and real-world signals, unleashing new potentials for soldier communications, spectrum awareness and electronic warfare. (2021-02-04)

Scientists establish multiple primate models of SARS-CoV-2 airborne infection
Army scientists evaluated three nonhuman primate species as potential models of SARS-CoV-2 airborne infection, according to results published online this week in PLOS ONE. Their work demonstrates that any of these species may be useful for testing vaccines and therapies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in over 104 million cases and more than 2 million deaths worldwide in the past year. (2021-02-04)

Researchers design next-generation photodetector
The new long-wavelength infrared photodetector from Professor Manijeh Razeghi could be used in night vision, optical communication, and thermal and medical imaging. (2021-02-02)

Discovery could lead to self-propelled robots
Army-funded researchers discovered how to make materials capable of self-propulsion, allowing materials to move without motors or hands. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. This research, published in Nature Materials and funded by the U.S. Army, could enable future military robots to move from their own energy. (2021-02-01)

UMass Amherst researchers discover materials capable of self-propulsion
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. The discovery may prove useful for various industries that want to source movement sustainably, from toys to robotics, and is expected to further inform our understanding of how the natural world fuels some types of movement. (2021-02-01)

Scientists discover how remdesivir works to inhibit coronavirus
By pinning down the exact mechanism by which remdesivir shuts down SARS-CoV-2's process of copying genetic material, scientists now have clues to make even more effective antivirals to fight COVID-19. Better antivirals could become urgently needed if new strains of the virus have the ability to overcome current antivirals and vaccines. They could also help in future outbreaks if entirely new coronaviruses leap from animals to humans again. (2021-01-28)

Kombucha tea sparks creative materials research solution
With Army funding, researchers developed a new way to generate tough, functional materials using a mixture of bacteria and yeast similar to the kombucha mother used to ferment tea. (2021-01-26)

Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of Army aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body. High-fidelity simulations assist engineers in maximizing how much load a rotorcraft can lift or how far a missile can fly, but these simulations aren't cheap. A new turbulence model could change that (2021-01-25)

Turbulence model could help design aircraft capable of handling extreme scenarios
To help build aircraft that can better handle violent turbulence, Purdue University researchers developed a new model that allows engineers to incorporate the physics of an entire vortex collision into their design codes. (2021-01-21)

MicroRNA may serve as therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury
WRAIR scientists have shown that traumatic brain injury causes coordinated microRNA dysregulation followed by increased amounts of the beta-site amyloid cleaving enzyme, or BACE1, and loss of amyloid precursor protein. BACE-1 cleaves APP to generate amyloid beta peptides, a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease pathology and brain cells loss, which are the focus of several clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease. Future research will characterize the direct role of miRNAs and their relationship to BACE1 within TBI. (2021-01-14)

New PTSD biotypes enables improved tests, sheds light on divergent treatments efficacy
Researchers from the PTSD Systems Biology Consortium identified distinct biotypes for post-traumatic stress disorder, the first of their kind for any psychological disorder. These biotypes can refine the development of screening tools and may explain the varying efficacy of PTSD treatments. PTSD diagnosis is complicated by over-reliance on self-reporting of patient symptoms, particularly underreporting signs of distress due to perceived stigma. Researchers identified two PTSD biotypes with differing genetic markers and underlying mechanisms of disease. (2021-01-14)

Army research leads to more effective training model for robots
Multi-domain operations, the Army's future operating concept, requires autonomous agents with learning components to operate alongside the warfighter. New Army research reduces the unpredictability of current training reinforcement learning policies so that they are more practically applicable to physical systems, especially ground robots. (2020-12-29)

Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire
The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts. (2020-12-21)

Invention may get Army quadcopters to move faster
Researchers believe a new hinge is the key to get load-bearing, large, Army quadrotors to climb a few dozen feet in seconds (2020-12-16)

Army looks to improve quadrotor drone performance
The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's, now referred to as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory collaborated with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to create a trajectory planner that significantly shortens the time it takes for VTOL tail-sitter drones to make this crucial transition. The team designed the trajectory planner specifically for the Army's Common Research Configuration platform, a quadrotor biplane tail-sitter used to test new design features and study fundamental aerodynamics. (2020-12-08)

Wind tunnel tests will help design future Army tiltrotor aircraft
NORFOLK, Va. -- After more than three years in development, a team of U.S. Army researchers and industry partners completed the construction of a testbed that will help to inform the design of future Army rotorcraft. The team plans to test the TiltRotor Aeroelastic Stability Testbed, or TRAST in a massive wind tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center to gauge the effectiveness of modern tiltrotor stability models. (2020-12-07)

Army computer models unveil secret to quieter small drones
It's no secret the US Army wants its small unmanned aerial systems to operate quietly in densely-populated regions, but tests to achieve this can be expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive according to researchers. (2020-12-03)

Outbreak investigation reveals "super-spreader" potential of Andes virus
''Super-spreader'' events and extensive person-to-person contact propelled an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a small village in Argentina from 2018-2019, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. An international scientific team reports the genetic, clinical, and epidemiologic features of the outbreak caused by the Andes virus, a member of the hantavirus family. Their analysis could aid in managing outbreaks of other viral diseases with similar transmission patterns, including COVID-19. (2020-12-03)

Army researchers look to reduce rotorcraft noise
Imagine a silent helicopter stealthily moving troops and supplies around a future battlefield. U.S. Army researchers look to helicopter noise reduction technology as a top priority in aircraft design. At the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, now known as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory, researchers collaborated with Uber and the University of Texas at Austin to investigate the acoustic properties of electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft, which use distributed electric propulsion to power flight. (2020-12-01)

Army, MIT explore materials for transforming robots made of robots
Scientists from the US Army and MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms created a new way to link materials with unique mechanical properties, opening up the possibility of future military robots made of robots. (2020-11-19)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

Repeated small blasts put military, law enforcement at risk for brain injury
Military and law-enforcement personnel repeatedly exposed to low-level blasts have significant brain changes - including an increased level of brain injury and inflammation -- compared with a control group, a new study has found. (2020-11-12)

Making 3D nanosuperconductors with DNA
A platform for making 3D superconducting nano-architectures with a prescribed organization could find application in quantum computing and sensing. (2020-11-10)

Soldiers benefit from psychological health research
Army scientists developed computer-based training to help Soldiers avoid unnecessary social conflict and mitigate anger-related outcomes. (2020-11-09)

Study confirms spit testing may help doctors diagnose concussions
Doctors may soon be able to more accurately diagnose concussions by measuring the number of certain molecules in a person's saliva, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The results of a recent clinical study confirmed that a patient's spit may be used to aid concussion diagnosis in a non-invasive, non-biased fashion. (2020-11-09)

Rice finds path to nanodiamond from graphene
Rice University researchers expand their theory on converting graphene into 2D diamond, or diamane. (2020-10-29)

Cicada-inspired waterproof surfaces closer to reality, researchers report
A multidisciplinary group that studies the physical and chemical properties of insect wings has demonstrated the ability to reproduce the nanostructures that help cicada wings repel water and prevent bacteria from establishing on the surface. The new technique - which uses commercial nail polish - is economical and straightforward, and the researchers said it will help fabricate future high-tech waterproof materials. (2020-10-22)

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss. In other words, if someone was given ketamine to kill pain associated with a battlefield injury, they would be able to tolerate blood loss just as well as someone who did not received this pain killer. (2020-10-21)

Army researchers collaborate on universal antibody test for COVID-19
Researchers with the U.S. Army Futures Command are part of a team that tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels, resulting in a process that is faster, easier and less expensive to use on a large scale. Their method holds promise for accurately identifying potential donors who have the best chance of helping infected patients through convalescent plasma therapy. (2020-10-14)

Researchers 3D print unique micro-scale fluid channels used for medical testing
In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications. (2020-10-09)

All members of military surgical teams can benefit from military-civilian partnerships
Researchers studied clinical practice patterns in non-physician members of Army FRSTs, particularly comparing the experience of active duty and Army reservist team members. (2020-10-03)

Symptoms, outcomes of sailors in isolation after COVID-19 outbreak on USS Theodore Roosevelt
The U.S. Army Public Health COVID-19 Task Force describes the results of an independent investigation of the shore-based USS Theodore Roosevelt outbreak response and 736 sailors in isolation status. (2020-10-01)

Sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity could bolster thermal imaging
Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar. (2020-10-01)

Innovative model improves Army human-agent teaming
Army researchers developed a novel computational model for gathering cognitive data that may be a game changer in the fields of neuroscience and econometrics, and has broad relevance to networked and multi-agent systems. (2020-09-30)

Cognitive flexibility training manages responses to social conflict
Scientists at the WRAIR and ARL developed a computer-based training to reduce anger, reactive aggression and hostile attribution bias--the tendency to attribute hostile intent to the actions of others--in ambiguous social conflict situations. HAB and unwarranted anger can jeopardize social bonds, team culture and team performance. It is also linked to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and other behavioral health concerns. Researchers showed the HBMT was effective up to 96 hours after the training. (2020-09-30)

Landmark discovery could improve Army lasers, precision sensors
An Army-funded landmark discovery at New York University could change the way researchers develop and use optical technologies, such as lasers, sensors and photonic circuits over the next decade. After years of research, the team of scientists achieved what many thought was perhaps impossible-they developed a method to create colloids that crystallize into the diamond lattice. This photonic technique, published in Nature, could lead to cheap, reliable and scalable fabrication of 3D photonic crystals for optical circuits and light filters. (2020-09-28)

Researchers explore how the human brain is so resilient
Future technology may be able to monitor and modify the brain to produce enhanced team performance, while increasing the efficiency and accuracy of decisions. The US Army may be able to use this information to enhance future operations. (2020-09-24)

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